Cover image for Mitsui madhouse : memoir of a U.S. Army Air Corps POW in World War II
Title:
Mitsui madhouse : memoir of a U.S. Army Air Corps POW in World War II
Author:
Zincke, Herbert, 1919-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
viii, 186 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Scott Field to Hawaii, April 7, 1937, to September 3, 1941 -- Clark Field, Philippines, September 3, 1941, to December 24, 1941 -- Bataan to Malabang, December 24, 1941, to April 20, 1942 -- PBY flying boats, April 20, 1942, to May 1, 1942 -- Under general fort, May 1, 1942, to May 27, 1942 -- Surrender and death march, May 26, 1942, to July 11, 1942 -- Malaybalay, July 18, 1942, to September 30, 1942 -- Transport to Japan, September 30, 1942, to November 12, 1942 -- In the care of Doc Curtin, Porky, and a guard, November 12, 1942, to April 20, 1943 -- Master Sergeant Shiozawa, April 20, 1943, to September 16, 1943 -- My friendly factory boss, September 16, 1943, to December 31, 1943 -- Never enough to eat, January 1, 1944, to October 31, 1944 -- Early B-29 raids, November 1, 1944, to January 17, 1945 -- An easier mood, January 17, 1945, to February 25, 1945 -- Incendiary bombing, February 25, 1945, to June 1, 1945 -- Sgt. Mizuno, June 1, 1945, to July 1, 1945 -- Hidatchi, July 2, 1945, to July 17, 1945 -- Destruction of Hidatchi, July 18, 1945, to August 14, 1945 -- Peace, August 15, 1945, to September 8, 1945.
Personal Subject:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780786414284
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Herbert Zincke was stationed at Clark Field in the Philippines when Japanese aircraft struck there only ten hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor. His unit had retreated to the island of Mindanao when all American and Filipino soldiers in the Philippines were ordered by their commanders to surrender. Zincke was shipped to Camp No. 2 on Tokyo Bay, where he was a slave laborer until the end of the war. Soon after their arrival at the Kawasaki labor camp, Zincke and his fellow prisoners began to call their barracks, which were owned by the Mitsui Corporation, the Mitsui Madhouse for the brutal treatment meted out by the Japanese guards. During three years at the camp, Zincke faced three life-threatening scenarios. He might survive the malnutrition, disease, and guard brutality, only to be executed with the other POWs if American forces landed in Japan. Ironically, he also faced a threat from American bombers, which endangered Camp No. 2 because it was located in the midst of a heavy industrial area. (Bombs did eventually destroy it.) This work tells the story of Zincke's survival and is drawn from the secret diary he managed to keep out of his Japanese captors' hands. Zincke recollects a terrifying blow from the Japanese camp commander's samurai sword, the diet of rice and thin soup that resulted in drastic weight loss and an inability to do the required factory work, the POW British doctor who attended the prisoners and was frequently beaten because of his constant efforts to keep the sick men from going to work, and many of the other terrible conditions and experiences he endured during three years of imprisonment.


Author Notes

Herbert Zincke is a retired chief warrant officer, United States Air Force. He lives in Silver Spring, Maryland
Scott A. Mills saw naval service in the Pacific Theater during the war. Retired from NASA, he lives in Belfast, Maine


Table of Contents

Prefacep. 1
I. Scott Field to Hawaii (April 7, 1937, to September 3, 1941)p. 3
II. Clark Field, Philippines (September 3, 1941, to December 24, 1941)p. 9
III. Bataan to Malabang (December 24, 1941, to April 20, 1942)p. 16
IV. PBY Flying Boats (April 20, 1942, to May 1, 1942)p. 32
V. Under General Fort (May 1, 1942, to May 27, 1942)p. 38
VI. Surrender and Death March (May 26, 1942, to July 11, 1942)p. 45
VII. Malaybalay (July 18, 1942, to September 30, 1942)p. 57
VIII. Transport to Japan (September 30, 1942, to November 12, 1942)p. 62
IX. In the Care of Doc Curtin, Porky, and a Guard (November 12, 1942, to April 20, 1943)p. 71
X. Master Sergeant Shiozawa (April 20, 1943, to September 16, 1943)p. 85
XI. My Friendly Factory Boss (September 16, 1943, to December 31, 1943)p. 92
XII. Never Enough to Eat (January 1, 1944, to October 31, 1944)p. 100
XIII. Early B-29 Raids (November 1, 1944, to January 17, 1945)p. 107
XIV. An Easier Mood (January 17, 1945, to February 25, 1945)p. 114
XV. Incendiary Bombing (February 25, 1945, to June 1, 1945)p. 118
XVI. Sgt. Mizuno (June 1, 1945, to July 1, 1945)p. 127
XVII. Hidatchi (July 2, 1945, to July 17, 1945)p. 134
XVIII. Destruction of Hidatchi (July 18, 1945, to August 14, 1945)p. 140
XIX. Peace (August 15, 1945, to September 8, 1945)p. 149
Epiloguep. 161
Appendix A Roster of Kawasaki Prison Campp. 169
Appendix B Kawasaki Defendants at the War Crimes Trialsp. 179
Bibliographyp. 181
Indexp. 183