Cover image for Le Corbusier : architect of the twentieth century
Title:
Le Corbusier : architect of the twentieth century
Author:
Frampton, Kenneth.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : H.N. Abrams, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
207 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Villas la Roche-Jeanneret, Paris 1923-25 -- Le Petite Maison, Corseaux, Switzerland 1923-24 -- Villa Stein de Monzie, Vaucresson, France 1926-28 -- Villa Savoye, Poissy, France 1928-31 -- Cité de Refuge, Paris 1929-33 -- Immeuble Clarté, Geneva 1930-33 -- Pavillon Suisse, Cité Universitaire, Paris 1930-32 -- Immeuble Porte Molitor/Appartement Le Corbusier, Paris 1933 -- Unité d'Habitation de Marseilles, Marseilles, France 1945-52 -- Chapel of Nôtre Dame-du-Haut, Ronchamp, France 1950-55 -- Chandigarh, Capital of the Punjab, Chandigah, India 1950-68 -- Le Petit Cabanon, Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France 1951-52 -- Millowners' Association Building, Ahmedabad, India 1951-54 -- Maisons Jaoul, Paris 1951-55 -- Villa Sarabhai, Ahmedabad, India 1951-55 -- Couvent Sainte-Marie de la Tourette, Eveux-sur-l'Arbresle, France 1953-59 -- Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 1961-64.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780810934948
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Widely regarded as the greatest architect of the 20th century, the Swiss-born Le Corbusier (1887-1965) left an indelible mark on modern building design and city planning. Here is an authoritative exploration of Le Corbusier's greatest buildings.


Author Notes

Kenneth Frampton is the Ware Professor of Architecture at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Le Corbusier was a challenging figure, intent on using his "five points of a new architecture" to change the "new man's" living and working spaces in order to bring them in line with the technology, aesthetics, and politics of his age. Combining a design-forward coffee table look with Frampton's (Labor, Work and Architecture) world class art historical chops, this book concisely documents 17 buildings designed by one of the most visionary architects of modernism. Moving chronologically by commission, with one chapter per project, Frampton provides contextual information about patronage and sites as vast as the capital at Chandigarh, India (Punjab province) and as small scale as the rural French domestic refuge Le Petit Cabanon. His vivid, imaginative narratives capture what it is like to walk in and around such structures as the gorgeous concrete Chapel of Ntre Dame-du-Haut in Ronchamp, France. The 100 color and 25 duotone images by photographer Roberto Schezen can look a little like architectural product shots, but they get the buildings at good angles and in good lights. Some of Le Corbusier's sketches further illuminate several of the most exhilarating buildings of recent times. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Table of Contents

Introductionp. 6
Buildings
Villas La Roche-Jeanneret, Paris 1923-25p. 14
La Petite Maison, Corseaux, Switzerland 1923-24p. 26
Villa Stein de Monzie, Vaucresson, France 1926-28p. 32
Villa Savoye, Poissy, France 1928-31p. 38
Cite de Refuge, Paris 1929-33p. 54
Immeuble Clarte, Geneva 1930-33p. 64
Pavillon Suisse, Cite Universitaire, Paris 1930-32p. 70
Immeuble Porte Molitor / Appartement Le Corbusier, Paris 1933p. 80
Unite d'Habitation de Marseilles, Marseilles, France 1945-52p. 92
Chapel of Notre Dame-du-Haut, Ronchamp, France 1950-55p. 104
Chandigarh, Capital of the Punjab, Chandigarh, India 1950-68p. 118
Le Petit Cabanon, Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France 1951-52p. 132
Millowners' Association Building, Ahmedabad, India 1951-54p. 140
Maisons Jaoul, Paris 1951-55p. 152
Villa Sarabhai, Ahmedabad, India 1951-55p. 160
Couvent Sainte-Marie de la Tourette, Eveux-sur-l'Arbresle, France 1953-59p. 170
Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 1961-64p. 182
Chronology of Realized Buildingsp. 198
Acknowledgmentsp. 199
Notesp. 201
Selected Bibliographyp. 203
Indexp. 205
Creditsp. 208