Cover image for Der letze Mann
Title:
Der letze Mann
Author:
Murnau, F. W. (Friedrich Wilhelm), 1888-1931.
Edition:
[DVD version].
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : Kino International, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (91 min.) : sound, black and white ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
The story of a hotel doorman who is demoted to washroom attendant because of his age. Humiliated, he considers suicide. Then, by a strange twist of fate, he becomes a millionaire. This silent film is told entirely by camera, without title cards.
General Note:
Silent with music soundtrack added.

Special features include: Excerpts from alternate versions ; photo gallery.

Originally produced as a motion picture in 1924.

For specific features see interactive menu.
Language:
English
UPC:
738329020620
Format :
DVD

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Central Library DVD 3592 Adult DVD Media Room-Foreign Language Video
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library DVD 3592 Adult DVD Foreign Language
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Summary

Summary

F.W. Murnau's German silent classic The Last Laugh (Der Letze Mann) stars Emil Jannings as the doorman of a posh Berlin hotel. Fiercely proud of his job, Jannings comports himself like a general in his resplendent costume, and is treated like royalty by his friends and neighbors. The hotel's insensitive new manager, noting that Jannings seems winded after carrying several heavy pieces of luggage for a patron, decides that the old man is no longer up to his job. The manager demotes Jannings to men's washroom attendant, and the effect is disastrous on the man's prestige and self-esteem. Logically, the film should end on a note of tragedy, but Murnau (either because he was ordered to by the producers or because he just felt like it) adds a near-surrealistic coda, wherein Jannings, having suddenly inherited a fortune, returns to the hotel in triumph. The Last Laugh was a bold experiment for its time: a film told entirely visually, with no subtitles save for the semi-satirical explanation of the climax. In a sense, Karl Freund's camera is as much a "character" as anyone else, commenting upon Jannings' rise and fall via then-revolutionary camera angles, jarring movements and grotesque lens distortions. Many historians credit The Last Laugh as the vanguard of the "German invasion" of Hollywood during the mid- to late-1920s. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi


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