Cover image for A harvest of color : growing a vegetable garden
Title:
A harvest of color : growing a vegetable garden
Author:
Eclare, Melanie.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Brooklyn, N.Y. : Ragged Bears, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Summary:
Six young neighbors plant a vegetable garden together, recording their work along the way, then celebrate with a salad made from their own produce at the end of the summer.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781929927319
Format :
Book

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SB457 .E24 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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SB457 .E24 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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SB457 .E24 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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SB457 .E24 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction STEM
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SB457 .E24 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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SB457 .E24 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Stunning photographs chart each stage in the growth cycle as a group of children transform a bare patch of earth into a vegetable garden: preparing the ground, planting the seeds and watching the seedlings grow until finally it is harvest time. Then it is off to the kitchen with some simple recipes.Five of the most popular vegetables are featured: carrots, beans, radishes, potatoes and zucchini. And brilliant photographs make this book a feast for the eye as well as a first how-to manual. Each step is explained in simple, easy-to-follow language.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

This cheery, oversize volume pairs British horticultural photographer Eclare's vibrant, sunny images with a breezily informative text. Each of five neighborhood children (plus one younger sibling) chooses a different vegetable to plant and also keeps a garden diary replete with snapshots. Their entries comment a bit on their choices ("I love carrots because they are sweet and crunchy. And I can share them with my pet rabbit") but concentrate on the process ("I sprinkled seeds into rows as deep as my thumbnail.... In about ten days little plants that looked like ferns showed through the soil"). A thoughtful page of hints ("Molly's Tips on Measuring a Garden"), one from each child, offers additional practical information. The photos affording colorful views of small hands, rich soil and the luscious harvest (including a terrific vegetable salad finale) are particularly inviting as they document each stage of the project. Eclare's streamlined approach caters to fledgling gardeners, and the conceit of adopting the various characters' perspectives works particularly well to instill confidence and enthusiasm. Readers will be scurrying for trowels and seed packets. Ages 4-8. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-A simple and clear book with stunning photos of fresh vegetables and charming children. The text is narrated by a young gardener as she and five friends discover the joys of growing their own food. When Sophie and company take over an empty lot, they transform it into a bountiful garden in just one season. Each child is in charge of one vegetable, and readers can learn the basic rules of gardening, simple procedures for novices, and specific tips from each of the group. At harvest time, the youngsters make a salad to share. The easy recipe is included. There are numerous books on how to garden with kids, but this one is pretty to look at as well as instructive. This is a special book, created by the gardening editor of a British magazine. The photos are colorful, appealing, and lush; the layout is attractive and adults will enjoy browsing. However, there is only slight child appeal here. The text is prosaic rather than descriptive, and the tone too reverent for youngsters to identify with. Still, this lovely book will find its place with primary-grade teachers and libraries with large garden or food collections.-Beth Tegart, Oneida City Schools, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.