Cover image for Old MacDonald in the city
Title:
Old MacDonald in the city
Author:
Williams, Suzanne, 1949-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Golden Books Pub. Co., 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Summary:
Increasing numbers of different animals, from one horse to ten ants, try to steal food from Old MacDonald's corner food cart.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.3 0.5 80677.
Added Author:
Added Uniform Title:
Old MacDonald had a farm.
ISBN:
9780307106858
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Clarence Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Collins Library PIC BK Juvenile Non-Fiction Picture Books
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Anna M. Reinstein Library PIC BK Juvenile Non-Fiction Picture Books
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Frank E. Merriweather Library PIC BK Juvenile Non-Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

In this new take on an old favorite, Old MacDonald is a food vendor in a city park. Whenever his back is turned, his cart is overrun with animals -- from one horse to ten ants -- trying to steal the food. Fresh and funny with bold, colorful artwork, this perfect read-aloud is sure to find a wide, welcoming audience.


Author Notes

RICHARD V. FRANCAVIGLIA is an associate professor of history and the director of the Center for Greater Southwestern Studies and the History of Cartography at the University of Texas at Arlington. He has written more than twenty articles for geographical and historical journals. His two previous books are Hard Places: Reading the Landscape of America 's Historic Mining Districts (1991) and The Mormon Landscape: Existence, Creation, and Perception of a Unique Image in the American West (1978).


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

What if Old MacDonald owned a pushcart and sold snacks in an urban park? As Williams (Library Lil) and Wickstrom (Hiccup Snickup) see it, agriculture is a picnic compared with all the humorous adversity their transplanted hero must confront. Old MacDonald, wearing a jaunty beret and vest, and sporting a handlebar mustache, takes pride in his yellow pushcart with its red rooftop: "Old MacDonald had a cart, E-I-E-I-O. Beside his cart there stood ONE horse, E-I-E-I-O." Then that horse, which belongs to a policeman, swipes an apple and it's all downhill by book's end, marauding animals have carried off almost all of his wares, and the now resigned but bemused vendor hands his remaining lollipop to the child who has been his self-appointed sidekick. Williams keeps track of the ever-increasing groups of animals (six pigeons, eight geese, etc.) and delineates their distinctive sounds (the three crows fly "with a caw-caw here and a caw-caw there"), but the acts of thievery are Wickstrom's province, relayed only in his oil paintings. His clever diversion draws readers into the cartoon comedy of his spreads and keeps them wondering what will be purloined next. Ages 3-6. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-When you take Old MacDonald out of the country and put him in the city, it makes perfect sense that instead of a farm, he has a food cart, and that, in addition to the traditional cats, dogs, and horses, he's surrounded by pigeons, squirrels, and ants. This rollicking retelling of the traditional song follows the original text fairly closely, with one clever twist that turns it into a counting book as well as a sing-along. Beside this Old MacDonald's cart stands one horse, behind it jump two dogs, above fly three crows, and so on. The humorous, cartoon illustrations, rendered in oils on Bristol board, show an amusing subplot in which the various animals snatch peanuts, hot dogs, and popcorn off the cart, much to the arm-waving, hair-pulling exasperation of the mustachioed MacDonald. Simple shapes, strong black lines, and good use of white space allow the pictures to contain a lot of action without being busy. A natural for storytime.-Anna DeWind Walls, Milwaukee Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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