Cover image for The biblical engineer : how the temple in Jerusalem was built
Title:
The biblical engineer : how the temple in Jerusalem was built
Author:
Schwartz, Max, 1922-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Hoboken, N.J. : Ktav Pub. House, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xxv, 166 pages : illustrations, maps ; 29 cm
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780881257113

9780881257106
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library TH16 .S38 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

The author, an engineer, has passionately pursued an understanding of the tools and techniques of the master builders and craftsmen who designed and constructed the Second Temple in Jerusalem. His narrative describes the historical, scientific, and political context of the construction and of the Temple, and his own drawings clearly illustrate how things were done. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.


Summary

The story of the Second Temple is long and complex. Built by the returning exiles from Babylon, extensively expanded by Herod, and destroyed by the Romans, its story involves science, history, politics, and geography. Who were the master builders who designed and constructed the Temple, and how did they accomplish their monumental job? Using classical and biblical sources, the author surveys architectural and engineering technology during this period. Almost 200 illustrations, maps, floor plans, and diagrams teach the reader about the tools and techniques available to Herod's engineers as well as the challenges they faced. The book pays close attention to historical developments. Background is given on the history of Jerusalem and the Temple Mount, from Solomon's Temple to the Babylonian Exile and down to the splendor of King Herod. Finally, we see the revolt against Rome in 66 C.E., the long siege of Jerusalem, the breaching of the walls of Herod's Temple, and its eventual destruction.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Jerusalem's Second Temple was built by King Herod and the exiles returning from Babylon 70 years after the First Temple was destroyed by Babylonians in 586 B.C.E. The Romans in 70 C.E. in turn destroyed it. Using biblical and classical sources, Schwartz explores the architectural and engineering technology used in its construction. The author begins with a description of ancient Israel, noting its climate and natural resources. The bulk of the book deals with the construction equipment used to build the temple and the methods of transporting heavy loads (such as stone blocks); engineering, planning, and logistic techniques; and the construction materials, such as limestone and timber. Work on the temple continued for approximately 80 years. A final chapter recounts the siege of Jerusalem by the Romans and the destruction of the temple. More than 100 illustrations, maps, floor plans, and diagrams complement the fascinating text, which includes excerpts from Josephus' Work of Antiquities. --George Cohen


Booklist Review

Jerusalem's Second Temple was built by King Herod and the exiles returning from Babylon 70 years after the First Temple was destroyed by Babylonians in 586 B.C.E. The Romans in 70 C.E. in turn destroyed it. Using biblical and classical sources, Schwartz explores the architectural and engineering technology used in its construction. The author begins with a description of ancient Israel, noting its climate and natural resources. The bulk of the book deals with the construction equipment used to build the temple and the methods of transporting heavy loads (such as stone blocks); engineering, planning, and logistic techniques; and the construction materials, such as limestone and timber. Work on the temple continued for approximately 80 years. A final chapter recounts the siege of Jerusalem by the Romans and the destruction of the temple. More than 100 illustrations, maps, floor plans, and diagrams complement the fascinating text, which includes excerpts from Josephus' Work of Antiquities. --George Cohen


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