Cover image for The little hippos' adventure
Title:
The little hippos' adventure
Author:
Landström, Lena.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Stockholm : R. & S. ; Andover : Ragged Bears, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.4 0.5 58884.
ISBN:
9789129655001
Format :
Book

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Central Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Newstead Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Audubon Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

The young hippos have always wanted to dive from dangerous High Cliff, and one day they get permission to make the journey to this attractive--and frightening--spot."


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 3-5. Three little hippos spend their days swimming in the river, jumping off their diving board, and asking permission (always denied) to go to Tall Cliff. One day, they take off through the jungle. They jump from Tall Cliff into the river, congratulate each other, and swim back. A crocodile slips into the river and follows them, unseen, drawing near when suddenly Mrs. Hippopotamus scares him away. She takes the little hippos in, chastises them, and reads them a funny story about crocodiles. The next day, she helps them build a higher diving board. Glowing with soft colors, Landstrom's ink drawings sensitively portray the characters and place them in a beautiful setting. Translated from the Swedish, the story perfectly captures a delicate balances of opposites: young children strive to be obedient, yet want to be daring; adults want to keep children safe, yet hope they'll be fearless. Carolyn Phelan.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Landstrom (the Boo and Baa books) explores the leisurely rhythms of childhood in this tale of a trio of young hippos. "On the hippos' fine muddy riverbank, everything is the same as it always is," the narrative begins, and lists its mainstays the big hippos relaxing in the warm water, nearby neighbor Mrs. Hippopotamus making her seaweed pudding. The young heroes, however, wish their diving board, which sits atop a wooden structure, were as high as Tall Cliff, an off-limits riverside ledge. "Every day they ask, `Can we go to Tall Cliff today?' But they never get to go. And then one day, after asking many, many times, they suddenly get to go." The spare text quietly builds suspense: "The little hippos have forgotten what was so dangerous in the jungle. Was it snakes?" After they dive from a ledge below the highest part of Tall Cliff, the trio swims home, pursued by a crocodile. Mrs. Hippopotamus saves the day, then embellishes their diving structure with a higher board, slide and swinging vine. "Down by the riverbank, everything is the same as it always is," the narrative circles back, yet the thoughts of the trio begin to stray ("It sure was fun at Tall Cliff!"). Landstrom's text captures the dynamics of this small community, and her unadorned, earth-toned art features endearing images of the diminutive threesome, especially as they timidly make their way through the jungle and peer, wide-eyed and warily, over the foreboding Tall Cliff. Ages 2-6. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Three little hippos, eager for a change of pace, ignore the many cautions they have received about the dangers of the African jungle and decide to go off by themselves for a dive at "Tall Cliff." They swim home after the exhilarating outing, unaware that they are being pursued by a large, hungry crocodile. It's not until they are almost home and Mrs. Hippopotamus bursts out of her bathhouse to chase off the predator that the little hippos finally remember what is dangerous about their environment. The next day, with the help of Mrs. H, they build a taller diving board right in their own part of the river. Landstrom's present-tense writing style is a bit awkward at times. The illustrations are cartoonlike, quite comical, and rendered in warm earth tones for a lovely, jungly effect. All in all, this is a slight but charming story and children will probably get the message.-Be Astengo, Alachua County Library, Gainesville, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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