Cover image for The wolf who cried boy
Title:
The wolf who cried boy
Author:
Hartman, Bob, 1955-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Putnam's Sons, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 21 x 26 cm
Summary:
Little Wolf is tired of eating lamburgers and sloppy does, but when he tricks his parents into thinking there is a boy in the woods, they could all miss a chance for a real feast.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.1 0.5 60404.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780399235788
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
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Clarence Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Clearfield Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Fairy Tales
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Collins Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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East Aurora Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Fairy Tales
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Hamburg Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Marilla Free Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Frank E. Merriweather Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Orchard Park Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Anna M. Reinstein Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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City of Tonawanda Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Audubon Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Niagara Branch Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

In this irresistible reversal of the classic tale, Little Wolf is tired of forest fast food, so he sets his sights on a a nice juicy boy. Full-color illustrations.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS.^-Gr. 2. Two funny turns on a familiar tale: Hartman's twists species; Levine's twists gender. In The Wolf Who Cried Boy, Little Wolf wishes for something besides lamburgers and sloppy does for dinner. Actually, he'd prefer boy. Father agrees that if Little Wolf finds one, he can eat it. So the next day, to avoid another boring dinner, Little Wolf screams, "Boy!" His parents run, sniff, and search, but don't find a boy. Little Wolf thinks that's so funny, he pulls the same trick again, and his parents catch on. When Little Wolf sees a troop of boy scouts, he can't believe his eyes. Of course, his parents don't believe him--even when a scout makes himself at home on the wolves' couch. Unlike fractured fairy tales that rely simply on premise, this one finds humor in the details, in both the story (Granny Smith pie featuring a "hard, crusty" granny) and the art (the mischievous scout, emboldened by the wolves' disbelief). Raglin's sturdy pen-and-ink pictures, which soar above their cartoon styling, are electric with fun. In Betsy, the illustrations are also more than simply amusing. Nash uses balloon captions for his sheep to express their thoughts about Betsy, the new eight-year-old shepherd. Betsy is determined to be the best shepherd ever, but Zimmo the wolf has another plan. Betsy spots Zimmo, who has all the characteristics on the wolf checklist, but he disappears when the grown-ups show up to check him out. The next time that happens, Betsy is sent back to shepherd school. The third time, Betsy deals with him herself and makes him a friend with her shepherd pies. The pacing slows a bit at the end, but there are some laugh-aloud moments and children will identify with the feisty, young shepherd. There's a glow and a flow to the pictures that add shine to the story. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

When a spoiled Little Wolf pooh-poohs his Lamburger and Sloppy Doe dinner, Father Wolf dreamily recalls a true delicacy. There was a time when a clever wolf could snatch a shepherd boy off a hill, he muses, leaning back in his overstuffed easy chair. Why, there was nothing better than a steaming plate of Boy Chops... and some Boys-n-Berry Pie. He and Mother Wolf promise to cook the first boy their finicky son can find. Thereafter, Little Wolf teases his nostalgic parents by yelling, Boy! Boy! for kicks. By the time Little Wolf spies a dozen plump Scouts hiking through the forest, his folks don't believe him anymore. Hartman (Bible Bad Guys) names many storybook meals, including Three-Pig Salad (with bricks, straw and sticks) and Granny Smith Pie, but never explains why boys are such an elusive quarry. Raglin (The Thirteen Days of Halloween) pictures the wolves as rustic homebodies in old-fashioned clothes, and Little Wolf as a prankster in short pants. His fine-line pen-and-ink illustrations, which have the dense crosshatching of woodcuts, seem immobile despite the keyed-up activity. This glib reversal of The Boy Who Cried Wolf has its slapstick moments, but can't top Jan Fearnley's Mr. Wolf books for sinister hijinks. Ages 5-up. (May) Fiction (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-In this fractured Aesop's fable, Little Wolf longs for "boy" for supper rather than his mother's usual fare: Lamburgers, Sloppy Does, and Muskratatouille. When his parents promise that if a boy shows up, they'll track him down and cook him, Little Wolf puts it to the test right away by calling, "Boy!" which achieves the desired result of ruining dinner two nights in a row. His parents catch on and decide to ignore their son just as a pack of Boy Scouts shows up, with one even invading the den, much to Little Wolf's despair. Hartman's spare storytelling style is enhanced by Raglin's textured pen and colored-ink illustrations that are packed with nifty details: Little Wolf's high-tops, the wolf emblem on the scouts' flag, and the decor of the wolf den. A fun twist on a traditional tale.-Donna L. Scanlon, Lancaster County Library, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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