Cover image for History of interior design
Title:
History of interior design
Author:
Pile, John F.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : John Wiley, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
400 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780471356660
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library NK1710 .P55 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

Much like the history of art, the history of interior design encompasses numerous styles, movements, and individual artistic contributions. It also reflects the influence of international political and social developments. A basic understanding of this history is important for professional designers who look to the past for inspiration.


Author Notes

John Pile was Professor of Design at the renowned Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, for most of his teaching career.


Table of Contents

Prefacep. 8
Acknowledgmentsp. 9
1 Prehistory to Early Civilizationsp. 10
Prehistoric Interiorsp. 10
Archeological Evidencep. 10
The First Sheltersp. 10
Dolmens and Barrowsp. 12
Evidence from Tribal Culturesp. 13
Pattern and Designp. 15
The First Permanent Settlementsp. 16
Mesopotamia: Sumeriap. 16
Ancient Egyptp. 17
Geometry and Proportionp. 17
Egyptian Temples and Housesp. 18
Egyptian Furniture and Other Interior Furnishingsp. 19
2 Classical Civilizations: Greece and Romep. 20
Minoan and Mycenaean Culturesp. 20
Knossosp. 20
Mycenae and Tirynsp. 20
Greecep. 22
The Templep. 22
Secular Interiorsp. 24
Insights: The Growth of Athensp. 25
Romep. 27
Arches, Vaults, and Domesp. 27
Amphitheaters and Bathsp. 28
Templesp. 30
Secular Buildingsp. 31
Insights: The Cost of Living in Ancient Romep. 32
Furniture and Other Interior Furnishingsp. 34
The Legacy of Rome: Technologyp. 34
3 Early Christian, Byzantine, and Romanesquep. 36
Early Christian Designp. 36
Byzantine Designp. 38
Insights: The Ravenna Mosaicsp. 39
Ravennap. 39
Hagia Sophiap. 40
Secular Buildingsp. 41
Early Medieval: The "Dark Ages"p. 41
The Romanesque Stylep. 41
Churchesp. 42
Germanyp. 42
Italyp. 43
Francep. 44
Englandp. 45
Scandinaviap. 46
Fortresses and Castlesp. 46
Monasteries and Abbeysp. 48
Insights: The Abbey at Clunyp. 48
Housesp. 49
Furniture and Other Interior Furnishingsp. 50
Islamic Influencep. 52
The Mosquep. 52
Moorish Elements in Spanish Romanesquep. 53
4 The Later Middle Agesp. 54
Elements of Gothic Stylep. 54
New Construction Techniquesp. 56
Gothic Cathedrals and Churchesp. 59
Francep. 59
Englandp. 62
Elsewhere in Europep. 63
Secular Gothic Buildingsp. 64
Insights: Construction Work in a Medieval Buildingp. 65
Castles and Palacesp. 66
Medieval Housesp. 68
Innovations in Domestic Comfortp. 70
5 The Renaissance in Italyp. 72
The Rise of Humanismp. 72
Renaissance Interest in Historyp. 72
Elements of Renaissance Stylep. 74
The Early Renaissancep. 75
Brunelleschip. 75
Michelozzop. 78
Albertip. 79
The High Renaissancep. 79
Bramantep. 79
Palacesp. 82
Insights: Vasari's Account of The Farnese Palacep. 82
The Late Renaissance and Mannerismp. 84
Michelangelop. 85
Romanop. 86
Palladiop. 87
Vignolap. 89
Interior Furnishingsp. 89
Furniturep. 90
Coveringsp. 91
6 Baroque and Rococo in Italy and Northern Europep. 92
Elements of Baroque Stylep. 92
The Baroque in Italyp. 92
Romep. 94
Berninip. 94
Borrominip. 95
Venicep. 97
Longhenap. 97
Turinp. 97
Guarinip. 97
Juvarrap. 99
Baroque in Northern Europep. 100
Austriap. 100
Switzerlandp. 103
Germanyp. 103
Furniture and Other Interior Featuresp. 106
7 Renaissance, Baroque, and Rococo in France and Spainp. 108
Francep. 108
Early Renaissancep. 108
High Renaissancep. 112
Baroquep. 116
Versaillesp. 116
Insights: Louis XIV and Versaillesp. 116
Louvrep. 117
Baroque Churchesp. 120
Furniture and Furnishingsp. 121
Regency to Rococop. 123
Paris Hotelsp. 123
The Petit Trianonp. 124
Regency and Rococo Furniturep. 125
Rococo to Neoclassicismp. 125
The Empire Stylep. 127
Insights: The Empire Stylep. 128
Provincial Stylep. 130
Spainp. 131
Platerescop. 131
Desornamentadop. 132
Churriguerescop. 132
Furniture and Other Interior Featuresp. 132
8 Renaissance to Georgian in The Low Countries and Englandp. 136
Low Countriesp. 136
Civic Buildingsp. 136
Private Dwellingsp. 138
Englandp. 139
Tudorp. 140
Elizabethanp. 140
Elizabethan Furniturep. 141
Jacobeanp. 142
Jonesp. 142
Jacobean Interior Furnishingsp. 143
From Carolean to William and Maryp. 143
Wrenp. 143
Carolean and William and Mary Interior Furnishingsp. 145
Queen Annep. 146
Queen Anne Furniturep. 147
Georgianp. 147
Robert and James Adamp. 148
Insights: Robert Adam and Syon Housep. 148
Georgian Town Housesp. 149
Other Building Typesp. 150
Georgian Furniture and Interior Furnishingsp. 150
9 Colonial and Federal Americap. 154
Colonial Styles in Latin Americap. 154
Colonial Styles in North Americap. 156
Early Colonial Housesp. 156
Early Colonial Furniture and Interior Furnishingsp. 157
Churches and Meeting Housesp. 158
American Georgianp. 159
American Georgian Housesp. 159
American Georgian and Queen Anne Furniturep. 163
Late Colonial Public Buildingsp. 163
Federal Stylesp. 165
Jeffersonp. 165
Bulfinchp. 166
Thornton and Latrobep. 166
Furniture of the Federal Periodp. 169
Other Furnishings of the Federal Periodp. 170
10 The Regency, Revivals, and Industrial Revolutionp. 172
Regencyp. 172
Nashp. 172
Soanep. 174
Regency Furniturep. 174
Revivalsp. 175
Greek Revivalp. 175
Germanyp. 175
Englandp. 176
United Statesp. 176
Gothic Revivalp. 178
United Statesp. 178
Englandp. 180
The Industrial Revolutionp. 183
Early Industrialization and Inventionsp. 184
Industry and Interiorsp. 184
Iron and Glassp. 185
England: Paxtonp. 186
Insights: The Public's Perception of Crystal Palacep. 186
France: Labrouste, Baltard, and Eiffelp. 188
11 The Victorian Erap. 190
The Roots of Victorian Stylep. 190
Britainp. 193
Mansionsp. 193
Middle-class Houses and Public Buildingsp. 193
Shaw and the Queen Anne Revivalp. 194
United States: Victorian Variationsp. 195
Mansionsp. 197
Vernacular House Stylesp. 198
Shingle Stylep. 199
Adirondack Stylep. 200
Shaker Designp. 200
Insights: The Shaker Philosophyp. 201
Early Skyscrapersp. 202
Public Buildingsp. 205
Furnessp. 205
Furniture and Other Interior Furnishingsp. 206
12 The Aesthetic Movementsp. 210
Britain: Arts and Craftsp. 210
Ruskin and the Roots of Arts and Craftsp. 210
Morrisp. 210
Webbp. 213
Other British Designersp. 214
Insights: Rossetti and the Aesthetic Housep. 215
Links to Modernismp. 218
Voyseyp. 218
Mackmurdop. 218
Mackintoshp. 219
United States: The Craftsman Movementp. 219
Stickley and the Roycroftersp. 219
Bradleyp. 220
Richardsonp. 221
Greene and Green and Maybeckp. 223
Developments in Continental Europep. 223
Germany: Muthesiusp. 225
The Netherlands: Berlagep. 225
13 Art Nouveau and the Vienna Secessionp. 226
Roots and Characteristics of Art Nouveaup. 226
Belgiump. 229
Hortap. 229
Insights: Victor Horta and Art Nouveaup. 229
Van de Veldep. 230
Francep. 230
The School of Nancyp. 230
Guimardp. 230
Other French Designersp. 232
Spainp. 232
Gaudip. 232
Germany: Jugendstilp. 232
Endellp. 233
Riemerschmidt and Behrensp. 234
Scandinaviap. 234
Austria: The Vienna Secessionp. 234
Olbrichp. 234
Wagnerp. 235
Insights: Otto Wagner and "Modern Architecture"p. 236
Hoffmannp. 236
Loosp. 238
United Statesp. 238
Tiffanyp. 238
Sullivanp. 240
14 Eclecticismp. 244
The Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Parisp. 244
United Statesp. 247
Key Architects and Designersp. 247
Huntp. 247
McKim, Mead, and Whitep. 249
Public Buildingsp. 252
Early Skyscrapersp. 252
The Rise of the Interior Decoratorp. 255
De Wolfep. 255
Woodp. 255
McMillenp. 256
Other American Decoratorsp. 256
Eclecticism in Professional Practicep. 256
Saarinen and Cranbrook Academyp. 257
Stripped Classicismp. 259
Eclecticism for the Massesp. 259
Houses and Apartmentsp. 259
Furniture and Accessoriesp. 260
Movie Theatersp. 261
Europep. 261
Scandinaviap. 263
Britainp. 263
Lutyensp. 264
Insights: Sir Edwin Lutyens and the Viceroy's House in New Delhip. 264
Ocean Linersp. 265
The Spread of Eclecticismp. 265
15 The Emergence of Modernismp. 266
Frank Lloyd Wrightp. 266
The Early Commissionsp. 268
Insights: The Philosophy of Frank Lloyd Wrightp. 269
De Stijlp. 270
Mondrian and van Doesburgp. 270
Rietveldp. 271
Pioneers of the International Stylep. 272
Gropius and the Bauhausp. 272
Mies van der Rohep. 274
Work of the 1920s and 1930sp. 274
Insights: Mies van der Rohe: the Tugendhat Housep. 274
Emigration to the United Statesp. 276
Later Commissionsp. 277
Le Corbusierp. 278
Paris: Developing the Machine Aestheticp. 278
Early Houses, Villas, and Apartmentsp. 279
Insights: The Philosophy of Le Corbusierp. 282
Town Planningp. 283
Post-War Yearsp. 284
Late Commissionsp. 285
Aaltop. 285
Insights: The Vision of Alvar Aaltop. 286
16 Art Deco and Industrial Designp. 290
Art Decop. 290
Francep. 290
Furniture Designersp. 290
Textile Designp. 293
Ocean Linersp. 293
United Statesp. 295
Designers from Europep. 295
Deco Architecturep. 295
Britainp. 296
Scandinaviap. 296
Industrial Designp. 297
Loewy and Other Designersp. 298
Design Trainingp. 300
Residential Designp. 301
Kitchens and Bathroomsp. 301
Lightingp. 302
Textiles, Carpets, and Furniturep. 303
17 The Spread of Early Modernism in Europep. 304
The Netherlandsp. 306
Germany and Austriap. 306
Italyp. 307
Switzerlandp. 308
Francep. 308
Scandinaviap. 310
Englandp. 311
18 Modernism in Americap. 314
Architects and Designersp. 314
Gillp. 314
Wright: 1920s and 1930sp. 314
Schindler and Neutrap. 319
Lescazep. 320
Goodwin and Stonep. 321
Gropius and Breuerp. 321
Mies van der Rohep. 322
Johnsonp. 323
Skidmore, Owings, and Merrillp. 323
Eero Saarinenp. 324
Interior Decoration: The Reaction to Modernismp. 324
Furniture and other Interior Furnishingsp. 325
Knollp. 325
Herman Miller Furniture Companyp. 326
19 The Ascendency of Modernismp. 328
Italyp. 328
Insights: Gio Ponte: Pirelli Towerp. 330
Scandinaviap. 331
Francep. 334
Germanyp. 334
The Netherlandsp. 335
Britainp. 336
United Statesp. 337
Urban Office Buildingsp. 341
Office Planningp. 343
Office Furniturep. 344
Interior Designersp. 346
Furniture and Other Interior Furnishingsp. 346
Textilesp. 346
20 Late Twentieth-Century Designp. 348
Prophets of Future Designp. 348
Kahnp. 348
Pellip. 351
High-techp. 351
Fullerp. 351
Insights: Rogers and Piano and the Centre Pompidoup. 353
Rogers and Pianop. 353
Fosterp. 354
Stirlingp. 356
Insights: James Stirlingp. 356
Post-modernismp. 357
Venturi and Scott Brownp. 357
Gravesp. 359
Johnsonp. 361
Post-modernism in Europep. 361
The Revival of Traditionp. 362
Greenbergp. 362
Sternp. 362
Late Modernismp. 364
Peip. 364
Gwathmey and Meierp. 366
Individual Stylistsp. 367
Starckp. 367
Putmanp. 368
Deconstructivismp. 369
Eisenmanp. 370
Gehryp. 371
Other Trendsp. 373
East-West Crossoversp. 373
Preservationp. 375
Green Buildingsp. 376
Glossaryp. 378
Bibliographyp. 384
Picture Creditsp. 388
Indexp. 390

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