Cover image for Lewis & Clark the journey of the Corps of Discovery
Title:
Lewis & Clark the journey of the Corps of Discovery
Author:
Burns, Ken, 1953- , production personnel.
Edition:
[DVD version].
Publication Information:
[U.S.?] : PBS DVD ; Burbank, CA : Distributed by Warner Home Video, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (240 min.) : sound, color with black and white sequences ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
Tells the story of the most important expedition in American history, led by Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Includes the stories of the young army men, French-Canadian boatmen, Clark's African-American slave, and the Shoshone woman named Sacagawea who went with them.
General Note:
Originally broadcast on PBS, Nov. 10, 1997.

Closed-captioned.

For specific features see interactive menu.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780780632356
Format :
DVD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library F592.7 .L395 2001V Adult DVD Central Library
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Summary

Summary

This Ken Burns documentary, narrated by Hal Holbrook, chronologically traces the well-documented 1804-06 military expedition of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809) and Lt. William Clark (1770-1838) to survey newly acquired lands and seek a Northwest Passage. Ordered by Thomas Jefferson (who labeled it the Corps of Discovery), the expedition was approved by Congress in 1803, and several dozen men were trained in Illinois in the winter of 1803-04. On May 14, 1804, the explorers departed from St. Louis, heading up the Missouri River by keelboat and continuing westward over the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific. Ken Burns spent almost four years on this project, retracing the route with cameras capturing mountains, rivers, waterfalls, and forests at the same time of year as first seen by Lewis and Clark. Traditional and Native American music provides an accompaniment to the grandeur of these vast vistas, while Stephen Ambrose and other historians offer illuminating anecdotes. Paintings and maps are intercut, but unlike other Burns documentaries, few archival photos are included (since photography was not invented until decades later). Reenactments, seen at a distance, are also kept at a bare minimum. The four-hour film premiered as a PBS two-parter on November 4-5, 1997. ~ Bhob Stewart, Rovi


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