Cover image for Cock-a-moo-moo
Title:
Cock-a-moo-moo
Author:
Dallas-Conté, Juliet.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First U.S. edition.
Publication Information:
Boston : Little Brown, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780316605052
Format :
Book

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Newstead Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Rooster has forgotten how to crow, and all the chickens are laughing at him. Will he remember what to say when the fox comes sniffing around the hen house? Full color.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 3-6. Vibrant acrylics raise this barnyard farce above similar tales about a confused animal who speaks in other animals' voices. Here it's Rooster who's impersonating his neighbors. When the sun rises, he can't remember what to say. He tries «cock-a moo-moo,» «cock-a-quack-quack,» and so on, and the other animals mock him. But when Rooster saves the sleeping barnyard from a fox, the cheers and support help him regain his true voice. The simple story is well told, with just the right suspense, but Bartlett's paintings steal the show. Brilliant, saturated colors burst from the pages, and the animals are all rendered in an expressive, appealingly naive style. Endpapers literally bloom in color and design to frame this cheerful spin on a classic story. Gillian Engberg.


Publisher's Weekly Review

This witty, rhythmic yarn introduces one very confused rooster. As the story opens, Rooster has forgotten how to crow: "When the sun came up in the morning, he took a deep breath and shouted... `Cock-a-Moo-Moo.' " Painted with large grainy brushstrokes in glowing colors, Bartlett's (A Story for Hippo) deceptively childlike opening spread establishes a spontaneous folkloric feel. Rooster continues to mimic the calls of his fellow farm animals ("Cock-a-Quack-Quack" and "Cock-a-Oink-Oink"); a predictable pattern of censure ("That's not right!") and correction ("Only cows go moo") encourages children to chime in. Debut author Dallas-Cont times the plot developments just right: Rooster's eventual vow never to crow again lasts only until a fox gets ready to raid the henhouse, when Rooster's noisy response turns him into a barnyard hero. Viewed mostly at close range, Bartlett's animals bustle around the pages, exuding the energy Dallas-Cont's writing suggests. Lots of fun. Ages 2-6. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Rooster has forgotten how to crow. One morning he greets the sun by calling, "Cock-a-moo-moo!" After the cows remind him that only cows moo, he attempts to wake the barnyard with sounds of cock-a-quack-quack, cock-a-oink-oink, and cock-a-baa-baa. The ducks, pigs, and sheep point out his errors and the other chickens tell him that he is "getting it all wrong," and Rooster sadly decides that he will never crow again. But, that night, when the rest of the farm is sleeping, a fox sneaks into the henhouse. Mooing, quacking, oinking, and baaing, the heroic fowl wakes all the other creatures and they chase away the intruder. A proud rooster then crows, "cock-a-doodle-doo!" And he never gets it wrong again. With its breezy text, thoughtful pacing, and bouncing rhythm, Cock-a-Moo-Moo is an ideal read-aloud. The book lends itself to participation, and children will surely join in on Rooster's mixed-up crows. Bartlett's lush, sunny paintings and the playful design make the full-page spreads seem to quiver with energy. Pair this title with Bernard Most's Cock-a-Doodle-Moo! (Harcourt, 1996) to add a bit of humor and merriment to farm and animal-sound storytimes.-Shawn Brommer, South Central Library System, Madison, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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