Cover image for The Arthur Miller audio collection [Death of a salesman & The crucible].
Title:
The Arthur Miller audio collection [Death of a salesman & The crucible].
Author:
Miller, Arthur, 1915-2005.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Caedmon, [2002]

â„—2002
Physical Description:
4 audio discs (approximately 4 hr.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Unabridged.
Language:
English
Contents:
Death of a salesman -- The crucible.
Added Corporate Author:
Added Title:
Death of a salesman.

Crucible.
ISBN:
9780060501785
Format :
Audiobook on CD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Audubon Library PS3525.I5156 A6 2002 Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
Searching...
Audubon Library PS3525.I5156 A6 2002 Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
Searching...
Anna M. Reinstein Library PS3525.I5156 A6 2002 Audiobook Audiobooks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Full cast recordings of two of Arthur Miller's -greatest plays: Death of a Salesman and The Crucible Featuring Lee J. Cobb (Willy Loman), Mildred Dunnock (Linda Loman), Dustin Hoffman (Bernard) and Jerome Dempsey (Reverend Parris)

Arthur Miller's Pulitzer Prize winner, Death of a Salesman , which he describes as "the tragedy of a man who gave his life, or sold it" in pursuit of the American Dream, is as relevant today as it was fifty years ago. Directed by Ulu Grosbard and recorded in 1965, this recording includes an introduction read by Arthur Miller.

The Crucible , first produced in 1953, is Miller's most produced play, addressing mass hysteria, empty piety and collective evil. It is a play that is not only relentlessly -suspenseful and vastly moving, but that compels listeners to gather their hearts and consciences in ways that only the greatest theater can. This production was recorded in 1972 and was directed by John Berry.


Author Notes

The son of a well-to-do New York Jewish family, Miller graduated from high school and then went to work in a warehouse. He was born on October 17, 1915, in Harlem, New York City. His plays have been called "political," but he considers the areas of literature and politics to be quite separate and has said, "The only sure and valid aim---speaking of art as a weapon---is the humanizing of man." The recurring theme of all his plays is the relationship between a man's identity and the image that society demands of him. After two years, he entered the University of Michigan, where he soon started writing plays.

All My Sons (1947), a Broadway success that won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award in 1947, tells the story of a son, home from the war, who learns that his brother's death was due to defective airplane parts turned out by their profiteering father. Death of a Salesman (1949), Miller's experimental yet classical American tragedy, received both the Pulitzer Prize and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award in 1949. It is a poignant statement of a man facing himself and his failure. In The Crucible (1953), a play about bigotry in the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692, Miller brings into focus the social tragedy of a society gone mad, as well as the agony of a heroic individual. The play was generally considered to be a comment on the McCarthyism of its time. Miller himself appeared before the Congressional Un-American Activities Committee and steadfastly refused to involve his friends and associates when questioned about them.

His screenplay for The Misfits (1961), from his short story, was written for his second wife, actress Marilyn Monroe (see Vol. 3); After the Fall (1964) has clear autobiographical overtones and involves the story of this ill-fated marriage as well as further dealing with Miller's experiences with McCarthyism. In the one-act Incident at Vichy (1964), a group of men are picked off the streets one morning during the Nazi occupation of France. The Price (1968) is a psychological drama concerning two brothers, one a police officer, one a wealthy surgeon, whose long-standing conflict is explored over the disposal of their father's furniture. The Creation of the World and Other Business (1973) is a retelling of the story of Genesis, attempted as a comedy. The American Clock (1980) explores the impact of the Depression on the nation and its individual citizens.

Among Miller's most recent works is Danger: Memory! (1987), a study of two elderly friends. During the 1980s, almost all of Miller's plays were given major British revivals, and the playwright's work has been more popular in Britain than in the United States of late.

Miller died of heart failure after a battle against cancer, pneumonia and congestive heart disease at his home in Roxbury, Connecticut. He was 89 years old. (Bowker Author Biography) Arthur Miller, American playwright, was born on October 17, 1915, in New York City. He earned an AB from the University of Michigan and began to write plays while still a student. He won the first of his many awards, the Avery Hopwood Prize of the University of Michigan, for his first play, Honors at Dawn. This was followed by many other award-winning plays. One of the best-known of these, Death of a Salesman, won the Pulitzer Prize in Drama in 1949 as well as a Drama Critics Circle Award; it continues to be one of the most frequently performed and adapted plays of this century. Some of his other titles include The Crucible, A View From the Bridge, The Misfits, After the Fall, and Vichy. Miller also wrote several travel pieces, including In Russia and Chinese Encounters (both in collaboration with his third wife, Ingeborg Morath); a novel, Focus; and the autobiography, Timebends: A Life.

Arthur Miller was married to Mary Grace Slattery in 1940. They had two children and were divorced in 1952. In 1956, he married actress Marilyn Monroe and they divorced in 1961. He married Morath in 1962 and they have two children together.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Google Preview