Cover image for US design 1975-2000 : [in conjunction with the exhibition of the same name organized by the Denver Art Museum ; exhibition tour: Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado, February-May 2002 ; Bass Museum of Art, Miami, Florida, February-May 2003 ; American Craft Museum, New York, New York, June-October 2003 ; Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Memphis, Tennessee, November 2003-February 2004]
Title:
US design 1975-2000 : [in conjunction with the exhibition of the same name organized by the Denver Art Museum ; exhibition tour: Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado, February-May 2002 ; Bass Museum of Art, Miami, Florida, February-May 2003 ; American Craft Museum, New York, New York, June-October 2003 ; Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Memphis, Tennessee, November 2003-February 2004]
Publication Information:
Munich : Prestel, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
255 pages : many illustrations (mostly color) ; 31 cm
General Note:
Exhibition catalog.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9783791326849
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library NK1404 .U7 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Look around you. Unless you're in the wilderness, your eyes will alight on a remarkable array of man-made objects in a man-made environment, everything from a pen to a coffee cup, computer, desk, window, street, and automobile. Yet, in spite of the pervasiveness of industrial design, its process, motives, and consequences are not well understood, a conceptual gap these three books seek to fill. Heskett, a professor of design at Chicago's Illinois Institute of Technology and author of the textbook Industrial Design (1981), defines design in a "meaningful, holistic sense" by working from the recognition that "design is one of the basic characteristics of what it is to be human, and an essential determinant of the quality of human life." In a notably lucid narrative rich in provocative examples, he succinctly traces design's development from the earliest of technological breakthroughs to today's frenzied array of gadgets, graphics, and objects great and small, essential and frivolous. He goes beyond the classic duo of form and function to discuss utility and significance and to differentiate between the ephemeral and the enduring. Toledo, Ohio, isn't the city that first comes to mind as a design capital, but, in fact, it was a mecca for industrial designers at the dawn of the twentieth century, thanks to a socially responsible glass manufacturer named Edward Drummond Libbey, who built a factory and founded an art museum. Inspired by a utopian vision of the union of art and industry, Libbey and his colleagues established the influential Toledo Museum School of Design at the heart of a community of cutting-edge designers and manufacturers who produced everything from scales to picture windows, bicycles, glassware, and Jeeps. This lively, well-illustrated volume, which features a roster of engaging contributors, including Heskett, celebrates the Toledo's "pioneering enthusiasm for modern industrial design," a key phase in the evolution of design in America. The texture and timbre of twentieth-century American life were created by a flood of mass-produced products that reached astonishing proportions with the advent of the digital revolution. Design historians are just beginning to get a hook on the hectic era that delivered the Post-it Note, Stealth bomber, personal computer, ergonomic design, and Rollerblades. USDesign, 1975^-2000, the print facet of a traveling exhibition organized by the Denver Art Museum, covers the diverse and progressive work of late-century architectural, graphic, decorative, and industrial designers by presenting a wealth of intriguing illustrations and text that combines design theory with discussion of manufacturing and marketing techniques forged in the increasingly global marketplace. Fanciful concepts, sheer extravagance, and good old-fashioned problem solving are all evident in this instructive and enjoyable overview. --Donna Seaman


Choice Review

US Design, 1975-2000 elegantly chronicles the last quarter century of design in the US through text and photographs. The 250-plus pages are divided into five basic sections discussing architecture and industrial and graphic design, concluding with a ten-page biographical section. The 12 by 9.5-inch hardcover format serves as a catalog in conjunction with an exhibition of the same name organized by the Denver Art Museum. The pictures and essays pose the question of what "constitutes an American designer and design." Tracing the impact of design from the 18th century, the catalog begins to assess and celebrate the pluralism that was one of the major characteristic features of contemporary design. Styles and theories were abandoned for a more eclectic approach, resulting in a variety of viewpoints. The book is a major accomplishment and should be included in the libraries of all institutions that support inquiry into the history and theory of contemporary American design. General readers; upper-division undergraduates through professionals. D. Ichiyama Purdue University


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