Cover image for The Navajo
Title:
The Navajo
Author:
Woods, Geraldine.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Franklin Watts, 2002.
Physical Description:
63 pages : color illustrations ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
840 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 6.2 1.0 56372.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 6.5 3 Quiz: 28293 Guided reading level: S.
ISBN:
9780531139509
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library E99.N3 W748 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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Clarence Library E99.N3 W748 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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East Aurora Library E99.N3 W748 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Niagara Branch Library E99.N3 W748 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lackawanna Library E99.N3 W748 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

An excellent introduction to Native American studies, Indians of the Americas weaves together the people, culture, traditions, crafts, food, history, and struggle for survival of some of the first groups to call America home. Fascinating and comprehensive, each book in the series draws from primary source materials as well as historical archives to address the topics most frequently covered in social studies and American history curricula.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 5^-7. Two titles in the Watts Library--Indians of the Americas series offer glimpses of Native American culture and history. Woods' title about the Navajo includes the Navajo creation tale, describes the land where the tribe has lived for centuries, and looks at housing and clothing, ceremonies and spiritual life, and the clan system. Also mentioned are the Navajo code talkers, who devised the only unbreakable code in World War II, and the continuing dispute over land with the Hopi, as well as a brief look at contemporary concerns and successes. North American Indian Music describes the many uses of music since ancient times and explains the unique beat, rhythm, and melody that characterize much Indian music. Subsequent chapters focus on music from specific tribes. The colorful photos in both titles enhance the texts nicely, but some of the drawings of historical events are inappropriate and of poor quality. The authors cite their information sources, but both titles show an outsider's perspective. Each book concludes with a glossary, a bibliography, and time line. Whenever possible, teachers should provide native sources to complement this series. --Karen Hutt


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