Cover image for Skies : poems
Title:
Skies : poems
Author:
Myles, Eileen.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Santa Rosa, CA : Black Sparrow Press, 2001.
Physical Description:
213 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781574231755

9781574231762

9781574231748
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS3563.Y498 S58 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

In her new book of poems Eileen Myles (author of Black Sparrow's Chelsea Girls, School of Fish and Maxfield Parrish) drags the chatty abstraction of New York School Poetry kicking and screaming into the passionate and mercurial landscape of the sky above. This hard-edged book about life in lower Manhattan concludes with a powerful and erotic sequence of love poems, woman to woman. Skies is Myles' strongest and most surprising book yet.


Summary

In her new book of poems Eileen Myles (author of Black Sparrow's Chelsea Girls, School of Fish and Maxfield Parrish) drags the chatty abstraction of New York School Poetry kicking and screaming into the passionate and mercurial landscape of the sky above. This hard-edged book about life in lower Manhattan concludes with a powerful and erotic sequence of love poems, woman to woman. Skies is Myles' strongest and most surprising book yet.


Summary

Topics include the transformation of the work force in nineteenth-century Montreal (Bettina Bradbury), feminization of skill in the British garment industry (Allison Kaye), the relationship between work and family for Japanese immigrant women in Canada (Audrey Kobayashi), experiences of women during a labour dispute in Ontario (Joy Parr), contemporary restructuring of the labour force in the United States (Susan Christopherson) and in an urban context in Montreal (Damaris Rose and Paul Villeneuve), the effect of gentrification on women's work roles (Liz Bondi), inequality in the work force (Sylvia Gold), and theoretical issues involved in understanding women in the contemporary city (Linda Peake). An introductory essay provides a review of current issues. Feminists and women's studies specialists and activists as well as geographers, historians, sociologists, and policy planners will find this book of great interest.


Author Notes

Eileen Myles is an American poet and writer born on December 9, 1949 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts Boston (1971). She moved to New York City in 1974 where she participated in workshops and worked with and for several famous poets. Her career includes working as Artistic Director of St. Mark's Poetry Project, serving as Professor of Writing at the University of California, San Diego, and Visiting Writer at seven colleges.

Myles's first book, The Irony of the Leash, was published in 1978. Some of her other work include A Fresh Young Voice From the Plains, Not Me, Inferno, Maxfield Parrish/early and new poems, School of Fish, Skies, On My Way, Snowflake / Different Streets, and The Importance of Being Iceland. She has also written articles, essays, plays and other works of fiction and nonfiction.

She founded the Lost Texans Collective with Elinor Nauen and Barbara McKay and performed in group and solo performances.

She has received numerous awards for her work. Her latest awards include The Clark Prize for Excellence in Arts Writing (2015) and The Lambda Pioneer Award (2016).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Eileen Myles is an American poet and writer born on December 9, 1949 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts Boston (1971). She moved to New York City in 1974 where she participated in workshops and worked with and for several famous poets. Her career includes working as Artistic Director of St. Mark's Poetry Project, serving as Professor of Writing at the University of California, San Diego, and Visiting Writer at seven colleges.

Myles's first book, The Irony of the Leash, was published in 1978. Some of her other work include A Fresh Young Voice From the Plains, Not Me, Inferno, Maxfield Parrish/early and new poems, School of Fish, Skies, On My Way, Snowflake / Different Streets, and The Importance of Being Iceland. She has also written articles, essays, plays and other works of fiction and nonfiction.

She founded the Lost Texans Collective with Elinor Nauen and Barbara McKay and performed in group and solo performances.

She has received numerous awards for her work. Her latest awards include The Clark Prize for Excellence in Arts Writing (2015) and The Lambda Pioneer Award (2016).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Eileen Myles is an American poet and writer born on December 9, 1949 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts Boston (1971). She moved to New York City in 1974 where she participated in workshops and worked with and for several famous poets. Her career includes working as Artistic Director of St. Mark's Poetry Project, serving as Professor of Writing at the University of California, San Diego, and Visiting Writer at seven colleges.

Myles's first book, The Irony of the Leash, was published in 1978. Some of her other work include A Fresh Young Voice From the Plains, Not Me, Inferno, Maxfield Parrish/early and new poems, School of Fish, Skies, On My Way, Snowflake / Different Streets, and The Importance of Being Iceland. She has also written articles, essays, plays and other works of fiction and nonfiction.

She founded the Lost Texans Collective with Elinor Nauen and Barbara McKay and performed in group and solo performances.

She has received numerous awards for her work. Her latest awards include The Clark Prize for Excellence in Arts Writing (2015) and The Lambda Pioneer Award (2016).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Publisher's Weekly Review

These two new books give ample evidence of the strengths and idiosyncrasies of this popular New York poet, who is probably best known (at least to the MTV crowd) for having run for president in 1992. The longer collection, Skies, beautifully portrays the sweet metaphysical tragedy of having to bear lonely witness to one's own experiences. In an untitled poem beginning "The whole mess/ of it troubles me" (recalling Williams's "It's the anarchy of poverty/ that delights me"), Myles seems deep in the zone of this Heraclitean flux: "There's clouds/ painted on clouds/ is rusty russet/ the sky now, smooth/ like old cream..../ Our moments are/ so damn fast the/ turn of the boat/ my clumsy pen/ my heart beating...." The painterly description practiced by significant influences Frank O'Hara and James Schuyler gets dropped, compressed and narrowed into two-plus word lines that supercharge their openness, adventurousness and charisma, drawing in any new idiom, trashy or otherwise, that might have just been loosed on the streets: "The moon is/ so not a/ star," begins one poem. An essay in On My Way, "The End of New England," is even more colloquial ("That was the motto, the notion I heard in a talk by Avitall Ronnell about five years ago. Do you know her she's a theory person she was very stylish for a while..."), and that book as a whole seems designed to point up Myles's shifting, often quite intimate forms of address. Myles might be threatened with a sort of Bukowski-esque ghettoization, considering her ability to be incredibly interesting, to be the native informant of a life lived punkily on the streets, but her speaker is simply having the best of both worlds, as working-class Bostonian and New York aesthete. (Feb.) Forecast: Myles recently published a memoir of her Boston childhood, adolescence and coming to queerdom entitled Cool for You (Soft Skull). The Black Sparrow book is the longer and more handsomely produced of these two new poetry collections, but Myles's considerable following will seek out both. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Publisher's Weekly Review

These two new books give ample evidence of the strengths and idiosyncrasies of this popular New York poet, who is probably best known (at least to the MTV crowd) for having run for president in 1992. The longer collection, Skies, beautifully portrays the sweet metaphysical tragedy of having to bear lonely witness to one's own experiences. In an untitled poem beginning "The whole mess/ of it troubles me" (recalling Williams's "It's the anarchy of poverty/ that delights me"), Myles seems deep in the zone of this Heraclitean flux: "There's clouds/ painted on clouds/ is rusty russet/ the sky now, smooth/ like old cream..../ Our moments are/ so damn fast the/ turn of the boat/ my clumsy pen/ my heart beating...." The painterly description practiced by significant influences Frank O'Hara and James Schuyler gets dropped, compressed and narrowed into two-plus word lines that supercharge their openness, adventurousness and charisma, drawing in any new idiom, trashy or otherwise, that might have just been loosed on the streets: "The moon is/ so not a/ star," begins one poem. An essay in On My Way, "The End of New England," is even more colloquial ("That was the motto, the notion I heard in a talk by Avitall Ronnell about five years ago. Do you know her she's a theory person she was very stylish for a while..."), and that book as a whole seems designed to point up Myles's shifting, often quite intimate forms of address. Myles might be threatened with a sort of Bukowski-esque ghettoization, considering her ability to be incredibly interesting, to be the native informant of a life lived punkily on the streets, but her speaker is simply having the best of both worlds, as working-class Bostonian and New York aesthete. (Feb.) Forecast: Myles recently published a memoir of her Boston childhood, adolescence and coming to queerdom entitled Cool for You (Soft Skull). The Black Sparrow book is the longer and more handsomely produced of these two new poetry collections, but Myles's considerable following will seek out both. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Publisher's Weekly Review

These two new books give ample evidence of the strengths and idiosyncrasies of this popular New York poet, who is probably best known (at least to the MTV crowd) for having run for president in 1992. The longer collection, Skies, beautifully portrays the sweet metaphysical tragedy of having to bear lonely witness to one's own experiences. In an untitled poem beginning "The whole mess/ of it troubles me" (recalling Williams's "It's the anarchy of poverty/ that delights me"), Myles seems deep in the zone of this Heraclitean flux: "There's clouds/ painted on clouds/ is rusty russet/ the sky now, smooth/ like old cream..../ Our moments are/ so damn fast the/ turn of the boat/ my clumsy pen/ my heart beating...." The painterly description practiced by significant influences Frank O'Hara and James Schuyler gets dropped, compressed and narrowed into two-plus word lines that supercharge their openness, adventurousness and charisma, drawing in any new idiom, trashy or otherwise, that might have just been loosed on the streets: "The moon is/ so not a/ star," begins one poem. An essay in On My Way, "The End of New England," is even more colloquial ("That was the motto, the notion I heard in a talk by Avitall Ronnell about five years ago. Do you know her she's a theory person she was very stylish for a while..."), and that book as a whole seems designed to point up Myles's shifting, often quite intimate forms of address. Myles might be threatened with a sort of Bukowski-esque ghettoization, considering her ability to be incredibly interesting, to be the native informant of a life lived punkily on the streets, but her speaker is simply having the best of both worlds, as working-class Bostonian and New York aesthete. (Feb.) Forecast: Myles recently published a memoir of her Boston childhood, adolescence and coming to queerdom entitled Cool for You (Soft Skull). The Black Sparrow book is the longer and more handsomely produced of these two new poetry collections, but Myles's considerable following will seek out both. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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