Cover image for Spying : the modern world of espionage
Title:
Spying : the modern world of espionage
Author:
Fridell, Ron.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Brookfield, Conn. : Twenty-first Century Books, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
143 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
Examines the types of intelligence gathered by the CIA, the FBI, and the NSA, the technological and human resources used to gather such data, and the future of these three organizations.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780761316626
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library JK468.I6 F75 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Examines the types of intelligence gathered by the CIA, the FBI, and the NSA, the technological and human resources used to gather such data, and the future of these three organizations.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-Spy-game buffs will enjoy learning the basics of real-life espionage from this well-researched, up-to-date treatment. "Comint" and "Imint" technologies are defined and briefly explained, with a bit of political context provided. Although his tone clearly favors U.S. interests over those of other countries, Fridell objectively presents the failures of intelligence as well as successes, along with news of developments like "robofly" (an extremely small intelligence-gathering robot aircraft). He also covers industrial espionage and does an especially good job of showing how it affects national security as countries that are usually thought of as allies come under suspicion. He concludes that espionage can contribute to world peace, as opposing superpowers can learn one another's real capabilities, reducing the chances of misunderstandings that could lead to war. He also acknowledges the uneasy relationship between secret agencies and the citizens of an open society, and the complications and difficulties posed by drug trafficking and international organized crime. Fridell's accessible style is concise and he does not oversimplify complex situations. The illustrations are mostly black-and-white photographs that are well captioned and keyed to the text. About half are explanatory, and half are illustrative. This book is a good update or replacement for such standards as Michael Kronenwetter's Covert Action (Watts, 1991; o.p.), Gary McCuen's Secret Democracy (GEM, 1990), and Jules Archer's Superspies (Delacorte, 1977).-Jonathan Betz-Zall, City University Library, Everett, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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