Cover image for The tipping point : how little things can make a big difference
Title:
The tipping point : how little things can make a big difference
Author:
Gladwell, Malcolm, 1963-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First Back Bay paperback edition.
Publication Information:
Boston : Little, Brown, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xii, 301 pages ; 21 cm
General Note:
Originally published in hardcover by Little, Brown 2000.
Language:
English
Contents:
The three rules of epidemics -- The law of the few: connectors, mavens, and salesmen -- The stickiness factor: Sesame Street, Blue's Clues, and the educational virus -- The power of context (part one): Bernie Goetz and the rise and fall of New York City crime -- The power of context (part two): the magic number one hundred and fifty -- Case study: rumors, sneakers, and the power of translation -- Case study: suicide, smoking, and the search for the unsticky cigarette -- Conclusion: focus, test, and believe.
Reading Level:
1160 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 9.1 15.0 149589.

Reading Counts RC High School 11. 19 Quiz: 50316.
ISBN:
9780316346627

9781448724895

9780316324847
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The tipping point is that magic moment when an idea, trend, or social behavior crosses a threshold, tips, and spreads like wildfire. Just as a single sick person can start an epidemic of the flu, so too can a small but precisely targeted push cause a fashion trend, the popularity of a new product, or a drop in the crime rate. This widely acclaimed bestseller, in which Malcolm Gladwell explores and brilliantly illuminates the tipping point phenomenon, is already changing the way people throughout the world think about selling products and disseminating ideas.


Author Notes

In 2005, Time named Malcolm Gladwell one of its 100 most influential people. He is the author of three books, each of which reached number one on the New York Times Best Seller list. They are: The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers. His fourth book, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures was published in 2009.

He is a is a British-born Canadian journalist and author. Gladwell was a reporter for the Washington Post from 1987 to 1996, working first as a science writer and then as New York City bureau chief. Since 1996, he has been a staff writer for The New Yorker. He graduated with a degree in history from the University of Toronto's Trinity College in 1984.

(Publisher Provided) Malcolm Gladwell, non-fiction writer and journalist, was born in England on Sept 3, 1963. He was raised in rural Ontario and graduated from the University of Toronto, Trinity College, with a degree in History.

Gladwell was previously a business and science reporter for the Washington Post and is currently a staff writer with the New Yorker magazine. He is well-known for his many New York Times bestselling books: Blink, The Tipping Point, Outliers, What the Dog Saw, and David and Goliath. His writing is often a product of sociology and psychology with implications for the social sciences and business. Gladwell became a successful public speaker after writing his bestselling books.

In 2005, Time Magazine named Gladwell one of its 100 most influential people. Gladwell's most famous quote comes from his book, Outliers; he states that "It takes about 10,000 hours of practice to become an expert..." at any competition or task.

Gladwell was appointed to the Order of Canada on June 30, 2011. Gladwell describes himself as a Christian. He was raised in the Mennonite tradition, and wandered away from his Christian roots when he moved to New York, only to rediscover his faith during the writing of David and Goliath and through his encounter with Wilma Derksen. In 2005, Gladwell commanded approximately $45,000 for his speaking fee. His books include: Outliers, Blink, What the Dog Saw, and David and Goliath.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gladwell, a New Yorker staff writer, offers an incisive and piquant theory of social dynamics that is bound to provoke a paradigm shift in our understanding of mass behavioral change. Defining such dramatic turnarounds as the abrupt drop in crime on New York's subways, or the unexpected popularity of a novel, as epidemics, Gladwell searches for catalysts that precipitate the "tipping point," or critical mass, that generates those events. What he finds, after analyzing a number of fascinating psychological studies, is that tipping points are attributable to minor alterations in the environment, such as the eradication of graffiti, and the actions of a surprisingly small number of people, who fit the profiles of personality types that he terms connectors, mavens, and salesmen. As he applies his strikingly counterintuitive hypotheses to everything from the "stickiness," or popularity, of certain children's television shows to the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, Gladwell reveals that our cherished belief in the autonomy of the self is based in great part on wishful thinking. --Donna Seaman


Publisher's Weekly Review

The premise of this facile piece of pop sociology has built-in appeal: little changes can have big effects; when small numbers of people start behaving differently, that behavior can ripple outward until a critical mass or "tipping point" is reached, changing the world. Gladwell's thesis that ideas, products, messages and behaviors "spread just like viruses do" remains a metaphor as he follows the growth of "word-of-mouth epidemics" triggered with the help of three pivotal types. These are Connectors, sociable personalities who bring people together; Mavens, who like to pass along knowledge; and Salesmen, adept at persuading the unenlightened. (Paul Revere, for example, was a Maven and a Connector). Gladwell's applications of his "tipping point" concept to current phenomena--such as the drop in violent crime in New York, the rebirth of Hush Puppies suede shoes as a suburban mall favorite, teenage suicide patterns and the efficiency of small work units--may arouse controversy. For example, many parents may be alarmed at his advice on drugs: since teenagers' experimentation with drugs, including cocaine, seldom leads to hardcore use, he contends, "We have to stop fighting this kind of experimentation. We have to accept it and even embrace it." While it offers a smorgasbord of intriguing snippets summarizing research on topics such as conversational patterns, infants' crib talk, judging other people's character, cheating habits in schoolchildren, memory sharing among families or couples, and the dehumanizing effects of prisons, this volume betrays its roots as a series of articles for the New Yorker, where Gladwell is a staff writer: his trendy material feels bloated and insubstantial in book form. Agent, Tina Bennett of Janklow & Nesbit. Major ad/promo. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This genial book by New Yorker contributor Gladwell considers the elements needed to make a particular idea take hold. The "tipping point" (not a new phrase) occurs when something that began small (e.g., a few funky kids in New York's East Village wearing Hush Puppies) turns into something very large indeed (millions of Hush Puppies are sold). It depends on three rules: the Law of the Few, the Stickiness Factor, and the Power of Context. Episodes subjected to this paradigm here include Paul Revere's ride, the creation of the children's TV program Sesame Street, and the influence of subway shooter Bernie Goetz. The book has something of a pieced-together feel (reflecting, perhaps, the author's experience writing shorter pieces) and is definitely not the stuff of deep sociological thought. It is, however, an entertaining read that promises to be well publicized. Recommended for public libraries.--Ellen Gilbert, Rutgers Univ. Lib., New Brunswick, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Why did crime in New York drop so suddenly in the mid-nineties? How does an unknown novelist end up a bestselling author? What makes TV shows like Sesame Street so good at teaching kids how to read? Why did Paul Revere succeed with his famous warning?In this brilliant and groundbreaking audiobook, New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell looks at why major changes in our society so often happen suddenly and unexpectedly. Ideas, behavior, messages, and products, he argues, often spread like outbreaks of infectious disease. Just as a single sick person can start an epidemic of the flu, so too can a few fare-beaters and graffiti artists fuel a subway crime wave, or a satisfied customer fill the empty tables of a new restaurant. These are social epidemics, and the moment when they take off, when they reach their critical mass, is the Tipping Point.Gladwell introduces us to the particular personality types who are natural pollinators of new ideas and trends, the people who create the phenomenon of word of mouth. He analyzes fashion trends, children's television, and the early days of the American Revolution for clues about making ideas infectious, and visits market mavens and great salesmen to show how to start and sustain social epidemics. The Tipping Point is an intellectual adventure story and a road map to change, with a profoundly hopeful message--that one imaginative person applying a well-placed lever can move the world. Excerpted from The Tipping Point: How Little Things Make a Big Difference by Malcolm Gladwell All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Introductionp. 3
1 The Three Rules of Epidemicsp. 15
2 The Law of the Few: Connectors, Mavens, and Salesmenp. 30
3 The Stickiness Factor: Sesame Street, Blue's Clues, and the Educational Virusp. 89
4 The Power of Context (Part One): Bernie Goetz and the Rise and Fall of New York City Crimep. 133
5 The Power of Context (Part Two): The Magic Number One Hundred and Fiftyp. 169
6 Case Study: Rumors, Sneakers, and the Power of Translationp. 193
7 Case Study: Suicide, Smoking, and the Search for the Unsticky Cigarettep. 216
8 Conclusion: Focus, Test, and Believep. 253
Afterword: Tipping Point Lessons from the Real Worldp. 261
Endnotesp. 281
Acknowledgmentsp. 293
Indexp. 295