Cover image for The beat : go-go's fusion of funk and hip-hop
Title:
The beat : go-go's fusion of funk and hip-hop
Author:
Lornell, Kip, 1953-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Billboard, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xii, 260 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780823077274
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library ML3527.8 .L67 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Central Library ML3527.8 .L67 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

"The Beat is the first book to explore the musical, social, and cultural phenomenon of go-go. Rooted in funk and hip-hop, go-go - the only musical form indigenous to Washington, D.C. - features a highly syncopated, nonstop beat and vocals that are spoken as well as sung. This book chronicles the development and ongoing popularity of go-go, focusing on many of its key figures and institutions, including established acts like Chuck Brown (the Godfather of Go-Go), Experience Unlimited, Rare Essence, and Trouble Funk; well-known DJs, managers, and promoters; and filmmakers who have incorporated go-go into their work."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Musical historian Kip Lornell (African studies, George Washington Univ.) and cultural activist Charles Stephenson provide the first detailed history of go-go music, a unique and largely unknown musical style rooted in the African American communities of Washington, D.C. The authors define go-go as a "non-stop continuous form of dance music where there are no breaks between songs; sound is based on African rhythms with street/inner-city life interpretation." The term go-go also refers to the functions/locations where the music is performed, ranging from dance halls and clubs to community centers and high schools. Go-go was largely initiated by Chuck Brown in the mid-1970s. Lornell and Stephenson provide a deft exploration of the connection between the black community and Washington, devoting considerable attention to the changing (and troubled) local scene as well as to the music's various performers, promoters, media outlets, and films. The illustrations, notes, bibliography, and discography are most helpful. An intriguing introduction to a distinctive musical style, this volume is highly recommended for all libraries with an interest in recent developments in African American cultural and popular music. R. D. Cohen Indiana University Northwest


Table of Contents

Kip Lornell and Charles C. Stephenson, Jr.Kip Lornell and Charles C. Stephenson, Jr.Kip Lornell and Charles C. Stephenson, Jr.Kip Lornell and Charles C. Stephenson, Jr.Kip Lornell and Charles C. Stephenson, Jr.Charles C. Stephenson, Jr. and Kip LornellKip Lornell and Charles C. Stephenson, Jr.Kip Lornell and Charles C. Stephenson, Jr.Kip Lornell and Charles C. Stephenson, Jr.Kip Lornell and Charles C. Stephenson, Jr.Kip Lornell and Charles C. Stephenson, Jr.Kip Lornell and Charles C. Stephenson, Jr.
AcKnowledgmentsp. v
Prefacep. vii
Introductionsp. 1
1 The Roots and Emergence of Go-Gop. 11
2 Going to a Go-Gop. 45
3 Band Profilesp. 73
4 Communitiesp. 110
5 Entrepreneursp. 149
6 The Mediap. 180
7 Go-Go on Filmp. 206
Afterword: Go-Go 2001p. 229
AppendicesKip Lornell and Charles C. Stephenson, Jr.
Glossaryp. 235
D. C.'s Go-Go Bandsp. 238
Interviewsp. 240
Notesp. 243
Audiographyp. 249
Bibliographyp. 254
Indexp. 255

Google Preview