Cover image for The perfect pet
Title:
The perfect pet
Author:
Chataway, Carol, 1955-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Toronto : Kids Can Press, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.0 0.5 55991.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781553371786
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Newstead Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Angola Public Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Clearfield Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Marilla Free Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Williamsville Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Hamlet, Pygmalion and Podge are three little pigs who each want a dog more than anything else in the world. The problem is they just can't decide what sort to get. So Mr. Pinkerton at the pet shop suggests they take a dog or two home to try. But the first dog is AWFUL! The second is DREADFUL! And the third is TERRIBLE! All the pigs want is a pet that is small, clever, playful, friendly, warm, gentle, loving -- and who doesn't bark, dig, chew, lick, howl, wander or dribble. Will they ever find the perfect pet?


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Hamlet, Pygmalion, and Podge want a dog so much that kind Mr. Pinkerton, who runs the "Perfect Pets" shop, suggests that they try one out at home. The siblings take him up on his offer, but each pup they test has some objectionable characteristic. The three pigs finally sit down and make a list of qualities they want in their pet (small, clever, playful, warm, gentle, and loving), and what they do not want (an animal that barks, digs, chews, licks, howls, etc.). Mr. Pinkerton then comes up with the perfect solution: a cat. Holfeld's humorous acrylic-and-watercolor illustrations are perfectly matched to the story. The two brothers and their sister are distinctly individualized, and Mr. Pinkerton and his pet shop are amusingly portrayed. The proprietor always has a little mouse in his pocket or somewhere around, a variety of interesting pets are scattered about, and even the cat that provides the final solution is visible on several pages. A satisfying story about a common childhood wish.-Judith Constantinides, formerly at East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library, LA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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