Cover image for Tutoring matters : everything you always wanted to know about how to tutor
Title:
Tutoring matters : everything you always wanted to know about how to tutor
Author:
Rabow, Jerome.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Philadelphia : Temple University Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xxiv, 188 pages ; 21 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781566396950

9781566396967
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library LC41 .R33 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library LC41 .R33 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Inside each of us is the promise of a tutor. If you've ever taught a child to tie her shoe, or helped a friend with his homework, or even helped a stranger understand a posted sign, you have it in you to empower others through learning. Tutors are allowed to do what teachers and parents are often not able to do. They can be patient, observe, question, support, challenge, and applaud. They can move towards nurturing the true and total intelligence of their tutees. Learning to tutor is simply overcoming fears, sharing and acquiring knowledge, and appreciating the potential and wisdom in each other.



Tutoring Matters is the authoritative manual for both the aspiring and seasoned tutor. Using firsthand experiences of over one hundred new and experienced tutors, this long-awaited guide offers chapters on attitudes and anxieties, teaching techniques, and building relationships. It educates the tutor on how to handle and appreciate social and language differences; how to use other adults -- teachers, administrators, parents, employers -- to a student's advantage; and, when your student or circumstances determine that it's time, how to put a positive and supportive end to the tutor-tutee relationship.



Written by experienced tutors and tutoring educators, Tutoring Matters celebrates -- and provides just the right tools for -- an individualized and successful tutoring relationship and shows just how much you can learn -- about the world and yourself -- through teaching others.


Summary

Inside each of us is the promise of a tutor. If you've ever taught a child to tie her shoe, or helped a friend with his homework, or even helped a stranger understand a posted sign, you have it in you to empower others through learning. Tutors are allowed to do what teachers and parents are often not able to do. They can be patient, observe, question, support, challenge, and applaud. They can move towards nurturing the true and total intelligence of their tutees. Learning to tutor is simply overcoming fears, sharing and acquiring knowledge, and appreciating the potential and wisdom in each other.



Tutoring Matters is the authoritative manual for both the aspiring and seasoned tutor. Using firsthand experiences of over one hundred new and experienced tutors, this long-awaited guide offers chapters on attitudes and anxieties, teaching techniques, and building relationships. It educates the tutor on how to handle and appreciate social and language differences; how to use other adults -- teachers, administrators, parents, employers -- to a student's advantage; and, when your student or circumstances determine that it's time, how to put a positive and supportive end to the tutor-tutee relationship.



Written by experienced tutors and tutoring educators, Tutoring Matters celebrates -- and provides just the right tools for -- an individualized and successful tutoring relationship and shows just how much you can learn -- about the world and yourself -- through teaching others.


Author Notes

Jerome Rabow, the recipient of numerous distinguished teaching awards, is co-author of Cracks in the Classroom Wall: An Analysis with Readings. He is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at UCLA.
Tiffani Chin is an experienced tutor and Ph.D. candidate in sociology at UCLA who studies issues of education.
Nima Fahimian, also an experienced tutor, studies medicine at the UCLA School of Medicine.


Jerome Rabow, the recipient of numerous distinguished teaching awards, is co-author of Cracks in the Classroom Wall: An Analysis with Readings. He is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at UCLA.
Tiffani Chin is an experienced tutor and Ph.D. candidate in sociology at UCLA who studies issues of education.
Nima Fahimian, also an experienced tutor, studies medicine at the UCLA School of Medicine.


Table of Contents

Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xix
Recommended Readingp. xxiv
1 Attitudes, Anxieties, and Expectationsp. 1
Normal Fears and Anxietiesp. 3
Will the Students Like Me?p. 4
Will I Like My Students?p. 4
Will I Be Able to Fit in with and Understand Kids Who Are Different?p. 5
Will I Be Able to Teach the Students?p. 6
Will I Succeed?p. 7
Unconditional Acceptancep. 8
Attitudesp. 12
Giving up Expectationsp. 12
Displaying Enthusiasm and Interestp. 19
Feeling Empathyp. 21
Practicesp. 25
Practicing Patiencep. 25
Being Observant and Asking Questionsp. 28
Interacting as an Equalp. 28
Recommended Readingp. 29
2 Building Relationshipsp. 30
Making Connectionsp. 33
Responding to a Request for Helpp. 33
Picking up on an Interestp. 34
Avoiding Gifts and Bribesp. 38
Building Trustp. 39
Overcoming Past Experiencesp. 40
Showing Respectp. 42
Establishing Reciprocityp. 45
A Few Practical Concernsp. 49
Motivating Students to Learnp. 50
Applying Tutee Interestsp. 50
Providing Companionshipp. 54
Bargaining on the Relationshipp. 56
Setting Goalsp. 57
Going beyond Academicsp. 60
Establishing Boundariesp. 64
Dealing with Jealousyp. 64
Preventing Overdependencep. 66
Recommended Readingp. 68
3 Teaching Techniquesp. 71
Getting Students Interested and Involvedp. 74
Drawing on Student Interestsp. 75
Making Work Visual and Hands-Onp. 79
Encouraging Friendly Competitionp. 82
Easing Student Fearsp. 84
Showing Supportp. 84
Breaking Assignments into Manageable Stepsp. 85
Tying in Familiar Conceptsp. 86
Letting the Student Leadp. 88
Listening to Studentsp. 89
Looking at What's Not Workingp. 93
Adjusting as You Gop. 94
Challenging Studentsp. 96
Recognizing Student Ploysp. 99
Recommended Readingp. 102
4 Race, Gender, Class, and Background Differencesp. 104
Anticipating Differences before the Relationship Beginsp. 106
Quieting Presite Fearsp. 107
Evaluating First Impressionsp. 110
Adjusting to Organizational Set-Upsp. 112
Riding the Roller-Coaster Relationshipp. 114
Allowing for the Student's Attitudep. 115
Putting Your Foot in Your Mouthp. 116
Coping with Situations You Have No Idea How to Deal Withp. 118
Overcoming Differencesp. 122
Fitting in and Being as "Same" as Possiblep. 123
Maximizing Acceptance of Your Differencep. 125
Opening up a Conversationp. 126
Recommended Readingp. 130
5 Other Adults: Parents, Teachers, and Administratorsp. 132
Attitudes and Involvement of the Other Adultsp. 135
Involvement with the Tutorsp. 135
General Interest and Involvement in the Students' Livesp. 140
Discouragement and Lack of Involvementp. 142
Assignments and Activitiesp. 145
Labelingp. 147
What Can I Do as a Tutor?p. 155
Forming Relationships with the Other Adultsp. 155
Trying to Ignore Labelsp. 157
Recommended Readingp. 159
6 Good-byes: Ending the Tutoring Relationshipp. 161
Difficulties in Saying Good-byep. 163
Harmful Ways of Saying Good-byep. 165
Not Saying Good-byep. 166
Making Empty Promisesp. 170
How to Say Good-bye: The Clean-Break Principlep. 172
Giftsp. 173
Talking about the Experiencep. 175
Learning Experiencesp. 178
Recommended Readingp. 181
Twenty-Five Final Pointers for Tutorsp. 183
To the Readerp. 185
Bibliographyp. 187
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xix
Recommended Readingp. xxiv
1 Attitudes, Anxieties, and Expectationsp. 1
Normal Fears and Anxietiesp. 3
Will the Students Like Me?p. 4
Will I Like My Students?p. 4
Will I Be Able to Fit in with and Understand Kids Who Are Different?p. 5
Will I Be Able to Teach the Students?p. 6
Will I Succeed?p. 7
Unconditional Acceptancep. 8
Attitudesp. 12
Giving up Expectationsp. 12
Displaying Enthusiasm and Interestp. 19
Feeling Empathyp. 21
Practicesp. 25
Practicing Patiencep. 25
Being Observant and Asking Questionsp. 28
Interacting as an Equalp. 28
Recommended Readingp. 29
2 Building Relationshipsp. 30
Making Connectionsp. 33
Responding to a Request for Helpp. 33
Picking up on an Interestp. 34
Avoiding Gifts and Bribesp. 38
Building Trustp. 39
Overcoming Past Experiencesp. 40
Showing Respectp. 42
Establishing Reciprocityp. 45
A Few Practical Concernsp. 49
Motivating Students to Learnp. 50
Applying Tutee Interestsp. 50
Providing Companionshipp. 54
Bargaining on the Relationshipp. 56
Setting Goalsp. 57
Going beyond Academicsp. 60
Establishing Boundariesp. 64
Dealing with Jealousyp. 64
Preventing Overdependencep. 66
Recommended Readingp. 68
3 Teaching Techniquesp. 71
Getting Students Interested and Involvedp. 74
Drawing on Student Interestsp. 75
Making Work Visual and Hands-Onp. 79
Encouraging Friendly Competitionp. 82
Easing Student Fearsp. 84
Showing Supportp. 84
Breaking Assignments into Manageable Stepsp. 85
Tying in Familiar Conceptsp. 86
Letting the Student Leadp. 88
Listening to Studentsp. 89
Looking at What's Not Workingp. 93
Adjusting as You Gop. 94
Challenging Studentsp. 96
Recognizing Student Ploysp. 99
Recommended Readingp. 102
4 Race, Gender, Class, and Background Differencesp. 104
Anticipating Differences before the Relationship Beginsp. 106
Quieting Presite Fearsp. 107
Evaluating First Impressionsp. 110
Adjusting to Organizational Set-Upsp. 112
Riding the Roller-Coaster Relationshipp. 114
Allowing for the Student's Attitudep. 115
Putting Your Foot in Your Mouthp. 116
Coping with Situations You Have No Idea How to Deal Withp. 118
Overcoming Differencesp. 122
Fitting in and Being as "Same" as Possiblep. 123
Maximizing Acceptance of Your Differencep. 125
Opening up a Conversationp. 126
Recommended Readingp. 130
5 Other Adults: Parents, Teachers, and Administratorsp. 132
Attitudes and Involvement of the Other Adultsp. 135
Involvement with the Tutorsp. 135
General Interest and Involvement in the Students' Livesp. 140
Discouragement and Lack of Involvementp. 142
Assignments and Activitiesp. 145
Labelingp. 147
What Can I Do as a Tutor?p. 155
Forming Relationships with the Other Adultsp. 155
Trying to Ignore Labelsp. 157
Recommended Readingp. 159
6 Good-byes: Ending the Tutoring Relationshipp. 161
Difficulties in Saying Good-byep. 163
Harmful Ways of Saying Good-byep. 165
Not Saying Good-byep. 166
Making Empty Promisesp. 170
How to Say Good-bye: The Clean-Break Principlep. 172
Giftsp. 173
Talking about the Experiencep. 175
Learning Experiencesp. 178
Recommended Readingp. 181
Twenty-Five Final Pointers for Tutorsp. 183
To the Readerp. 185
Bibliographyp. 187

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