Cover image for Little Horse
Title:
Little Horse
Author:
Byars, Betsy Cromer.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First redfeather edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Henry Holt & Co., 2001.

©2002
Physical Description:
45 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm
Summary:
Little Horse falls into the stream and is swept away into a dangerous adventure and a new life.
General Note:
"An early chapter book."
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.2 0.5 58772.
ISBN:
9780805064131
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Material Type
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Status
Central Library X Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area
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Newstead Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Angola Public Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Boston Free Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Clearfield Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Collins Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Concord Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Eden Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Elma Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Grand Island Library X Juvenile Fiction Easy Fiction
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Hamburg Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library X Juvenile Fiction Easy Fiction
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Williamsville Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library X Juvenile Fiction Easy Fiction
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Can Little Horse find his place in the big world? After accidentally falling into a stream, Little Horse fights the swift current that carries him farther and farther from the valley where he was born.When he finally manages to scramble ashore, a giant bird swoops down on him. Little Horse runs for cover in a forest of flowers only to have a giant paw pin him to the ground. But a hand gently lifts him up and tucks him inside a warm cave-just like the cave he used to share with his mother.This tender, fast-moving tale, written by master storyteller Betsy Byars and enhanced by David McPhail's beguiling illustrations, is a true cliff-hanger.


Author Notes

Betsy Cromer Byars was born in1928. She graduated from Queens College in Charlotte, North Carolina. While she was in graduate school, she began writing articles for The Saturday Evening Post and Look.

Byars writes novels for young people. She is an expert at tapping in to the pain of adolescence, using bits of her own experience to flavor her characters. She is author of more than 23 books and has won numerous awards. Her book about a 14-year-old girl and her mentally retarded brother, The Summer of the Swans (1970), won the Newberry Award as the most distinguished contribution to children's literature that year. Other books include The 18th Emergency (1973), The TV Kid (1976), and After the Goat Man (1995).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-4. Byars blends fantasy and suspense in this beginning chapter book about a miniature horse. Curious Little Horse accidentally falls into a river that carries him far away from his home valley and his mother. Withstanding numerous perils along the way, Little Horse emerges in a new world in which flowers are the size of trees and birds are terrifying predators--the human-sized world, as children learn through the appealing, detailed illustrations. McPhail's play with proportions is a bit awkward, and letting the pictures, rather than the text, reveal most of the clues is not entirely successful. What's more, many of the pictures don't correspond to the action on the same page. But Byars uses language that's just right for beginning readers, and children who decide to tackle the story will enjoy the danger and drama of Little Horse's fast-moving journey and look forward to a sequel, suggested by the ending. Not exceptional, but a solid choice for animal lovers making the transition to chapter books. Gillian Engberg.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-This book seems at first to be a realistic wild horse story but it soon bridges into light fantasy. Little Horse falls into a river and is carried away from his homeland. After narrowly surviving a tumble down a waterfall and evading capture by a bird of prey, he comes to a land where flowers are as tall as trees. It is here that he-and readers-realize that he is tiny-about the size of a squirrel. His relative size presents new problems as he is chased by a dog and feels the ground shake at a man's approach. However, the man proves to be gentle and caring. He takes the animal home and gives him to a boy who provides food and an appropriately sized shelter. Little Horse falls asleep dreaming of returning to his homeland. Young horse lovers will delight in the idea of a real horse they could hold in their hands and will enjoy the small creature's adventures. The simple, sometimes-repetitive sentence structure is similar to that in easy-readers but the format is a more standard paragraph form and the print size is smaller than most. Though Little Horse's adventures are sometimes terrifying, McPhail's soft, almost fuzzy-lined black-and-white illustrations lend a comforting air of reassurance even at the scariest moments. These pictures also add to Little Horse's character and charm. While there is not much depth to this story, it will provide sweet feed for young equine enthusiasts just venturing into chapter books.-Louise L. Sherman, formerly at Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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