Cover image for My world of color
Title:
My world of color
Author:
Brown, Margaret Wise, 1910-1952.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Hyperion Books For Children, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Rhyming verses describe things that are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, brown, black, gray, white, and pink.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780786806058

9780786825196
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Clarence Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction A-B-C- 1-2-3 Books
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Concord Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eden Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Hamburg Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Anna M. Reinstein Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Williamsville Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Audubon Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction A-B-C- 1-2-3 Books
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Central Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-A-B-C 1-2-3 Books
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Summary

Summary

Well-loved for her books for young children, Margaret Wise Brown excels in bringing attention to the smallest details in a child's world. Here she introduces the concept of color to children with a wonderfully playful, lyrical text. Loretta Krupinski's jewel-toned palette, charming characters, and plentiful details perfectly complement the text.


Author Notes

Margaret Wise Brown was born on May 10, 1910 in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, New York, to Robert Brown, a Vice President at American Manufacturing Company and Maud Brown, a housewife. She attended school in Lausanne, Switzerland for three years, before attending Dana Hall in Wellesley, Massachusetts for two years. In 1928, she began taking classes at Hollis College in Virginia.

In 1935, Brown began working at the Bank Street Cooperative School for student teachers. Two years later, her writing career took off with the publication of "When the Wind Blows." Over the course of fourteen years, Brown wrote over one hundred picture books for children. Some of her best known titles include Goodnight Moon, Big Red Barn and Runaway Bunny.

Margaret Wise Brown died on November 13, 1952 of an embolism following an operation in Nice, France.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Krupinski (who illustrated the posthumous Brown anthology Mouse of My Heart) treats brief rhymed verses about 11 colors to a series of lavish tableaux, creating a visual story line in which two mice a painter and his apprentice travel through a fantasy landscape to discover that the world is a palette of these hues. The featured color dominates each extravagantly detailed full-bleed spread. As Krupinski takes on orange, for example, she sets the text within a large orange sun; below, the mice paddle a teacup (white, but decorated with an orange motif) in water where fish jump and bumblebees balance on floating oranges that have fallen from nearby trees. Her work offers a panoply of pleasing scenarios. For purple, the mice encounter a dapperly dressed Easter Bunny in the process of painting a large egg that is starting to hatch; a single yellow eye, almost as big as the mice's heads, peers through the eggshell's widening crack. While the visuals demonstrate considerable polish, the writing is frequently rough ("purple as coal"; "Green as the green/ Of the greenest fern/ Any rabbit has seen"), at least compared with the finely honed works Brown saw into print. The author's fans may want to keep in mind her similarly themed The Color Kittens (1949), illustrated by Alice and Martin Provensen and recently reissued. Ages 2-5. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Young readers are led through a bright blue door into a fantastical world where color is everything. Brown's endearing style is unmistakable in lines like, "Black as trees, Black as ink Black as the night Where the dark moles think." In this previously unpublished book, the author's lyrical prose is paired with Krupinski's cuddly creatures. Each spread highlights a color as children are led on a fun-filled excursion by mice in old-fashioned costume. The pacing, perfect for youngsters learning their colors, is achieved with repetition and rhyme, yet the detailed scenes are sure to encourage lingering. This combination is a tough trick to pull off, yet it is done nicely here. And though readers are never quite sure where they are, in time and place, they are always somewhere delightful. A concluding one-page summary of all the colors reminds children of what they have learned and how they can use the hues in their own world. There is one tiny glitch: the text begins before the title page, which takes away from the natural flow.-Holly T. Sneeringer, St. Mark School, Baltimore, MD (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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