Cover image for Elements of photonics
Title:
Elements of photonics
Author:
Iizuka, Keigo, 1931-
Personal Author:
Physical Description:
volumes < -2> : illustrations ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
v. 1. In free space and special media -- v. 2. For fiber and integrated optics.
Electronic Access:
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/onix05/98015244.html
ISBN:
9780471839385

9780471408154

9780471411154
Format :
Book

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Call Number
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Status
Central Library TA1520 .I35 2002 V2 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Deals with photonics in free space and special media such as anisotropic crystals.
∗ Covers all important topics from Fourier optics, such as the properties of lenses, optical image processing, and holography to the Gaussian beam, light propagation in anisotropic media, external field effects, polarization of light and its major applications.
∗ The book is self-contained and is suitable as a textbook for a two-semester course.
∗ Provides a particularly good discussion of the electromagnetics of light in bounded media.
∗ Only book that treats the two complementary topics, fiber and integrated optics.
∗ Careful and thorough presentation of the topics that makes it well suited for courses and self study.
∗ Includes numerous figures, problems and worked-out solutions.
∗ Heavily illustrated with over 400 figures specially formatted to aid in comprehension.


Author Notes

KEIGO IIZUKA is a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto and a Fellow of the Optical Society of America.


Table of Contents

Volume 1 Prefacep. xxv
1 Fourier Optics: Concepts and Applicationsp. 1
1.1 Plane Waves and Spatial Frequencyp. 1
1.2 Fourier Transform and Diffraction Patterns in Rectangular Coordinatesp. 9
1.3 Fourier Transform in Cylindrical Coordinatesp. 16
1.4 Special Functions in Photonics and Their Fourier Transformsp. 20
1.5 The Convex Lens and Its Functionsp. 40
1.6 Spatial Frequency Approaches in Fourier Opticsp. 52
1.7 Spatial Filtersp. 61
1.8 Holographyp. 81
Problemsp. 101
Referencesp. 108
2 Boundaries, Near-Field Optics, and Near-Field Imagingp. 110
2.1 Boundary Conditionsp. 110
2.2 Snell's Lawp. 112
2.3 Transmission and Reflection Coefficientsp. 113
2.4 Transmittance and Reflectance (at an Arbitrary Incident Angle)p. 124
2.5 Brewster's Anglep. 127
2.6 Total Internal Reflectionp. 130
2.7 Wave Expressions of Lightp. 132
2.8 The Evanescent Wavep. 134
2.9 What Generates the Evanescent Waves?p. 147
2.10 Diffraction-Unlimited Images out of the Evanescent Wavep. 150
Problemsp. 163
Referencesp. 164
3 Fabry-Perot Resonators, Beams, and Radiation Pressurep. 166
3.1 Fabry-Perot Resonatorsp. 166
3.2 The Scanning Fabry-Perot Spectrometerp. 176
3.3 Resolving Power of the Fabry-Perot Resonatorp. 192
3.4 Practical Aspects of Operating the Fabry-Perot Interferometerp. 199
3.5 The Gaussian Beam as a Solution of the Wave Equationp. 205
3.6 Transformation of a Gaussian Beam by a Lensp. 214
3.7 Hermite Gaussian Beam (Higher Order Modes)p. 223
3.8 The Gaussian Beam in a Spherical Mirror Cavityp. 227
3.9 Resonance Frequencies of the Cavityp. 232
3.10 Practical Aspects of the Fabry-Perot Interferometerp. 234
3.11 Bessel Beamsp. 237
3.12 Manipulation with Light Beamsp. 249
3.13 Laser Cooling of Atomsp. 254
Problemsp. 255
Referencesp. 260
4 Propagation of Light in Anisotropic Crystalsp. 263
4.1 Polarization in Crystalsp. 264
4.2 Susceptibility of an Anisotropic Crystalp. 266
4.3 The Wave Equation in an Anisotropic Mediump. 268
4.4 Solving the Generalized Wave Equation in Uniaxial Crystalsp. 269
4.5 Graphical Methodsp. 282
4.6 Treatment of Boundary Problems Between Anisotropic Media by the Indicatrix Methodp. 292
Problemsp. 298
Referencesp. 301
5 Optical Properties of Crystals Under Various External Fieldsp. 302
5.1 Expressing the Distortion of the Indicatrixp. 302
5.2 Electrooptic Effectsp. 304
5.3 Elastooptic Effectp. 317
5.4 Magnetooptic Effectp. 326
5.5 Optical Isolatorp. 327
5.6 Photorefractive Effectp. 331
5.7 Optical Amplifier Based on the Photorefractive Effectp. 334
5.8 Photorefractive Beam Combiner for Coherent Homodyne Detectionp. 339
5.9 Optically Tunable Optical Filterp. 341
5.10 Liquid Crystalsp. 341
5.11 Dye-Doped Liquid Crystalp. 357
Problemsp. 358
Referencesp. 359
6 Polarization of Lightp. 362
6.1 Introductionp. 363
6.2 Circle Diagrams for Graphical Solutionsp. 365
6.3 Various Types of Retardersp. 378
6.4 How to Use Waveplatesp. 385
6.5 Linear Polarizersp. 394
6.6 Circularly Polarizing Sheetsp. 409
6.7 Rotatorsp. 412
6.8 The Jones Vector and the Jones Matrixp. 421
6.9 States of Polarization and Their Component Wavesp. 431
Problemsp. 446
Referencesp. 449
7 How to Construct and Use the Poincare Spherep. 451
7.1 Component Field Ratio in the Complex Planep. 452
7.2 Constant Azimuth [theta] and Ellipticity [epsilon] Lines in the Component Field Ratio Complex Planep. 455
7.3 Argand Diagramp. 459
7.4 From Argand Diagram to Poincare Spherep. 469
7.5 Poincare Sphere Solutions for Retardersp. 479
7.6 Poincare Sphere Solutions for Polarizersp. 485
7.7 Poincare Sphere Tracesp. 490
7.8 Movement of a Point on the Poincare Spherep. 494
Problemsp. 501
Referencesp. 503
8 Phase Conjugate Opticsp. 504
8.1 The Phase Conjugate Mirrorp. 504
8.2 Generation of a Phase Conjugate Wave Using a Hologramp. 504
8.3 Expressions for Phase Conjugate Wavesp. 507
8.4 Phase Conjugate Mirror for Recovering Phasefront Distortionp. 508
8.5 Phase Conjugation in Real Timep. 511
8.6 Picture Processing by Means of a Phase Conjugate Mirrorp. 512
8.7 Distortion-Free Amplification of Laser Light by Means of a Phase Conjugate Mirrorp. 513
8.8 Self-Tracking of a Laser Beamp. 514
8.9 Picture Processingp. 519
8.10 Theory of Phase Conjugate Opticsp. 521
8.11 The Gain of Forward Four-Wave Mixingp. 533
8.12 Pulse Broadening Compensation by Forward Four-Wave Mixingp. 537
Problemsp. 541
Referencesp. 543
Appendix A Derivation of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff Diffraction Formula from the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld Diffraction Formulap. 545
Appendix B Why the Analytic Signal Method is Not Applicable to the Nonlinear Systemp. 547
Appendix C Derivation of P[subscript NL]p. 551
Answers to Problemsp. 554
Indexp. 1
Volume II Prefacep. xxv
9 Planar Optical Guides for Integrated Opticsp. 605
9.1 Classification of the Mathematical Approaches to the Slab Optical Guidep. 606
9.2 Wave Optics Approachp. 607
9.3 Characteristic Equations of the TM Modesp. 610
9.4 Cross-Sectional Distribution of Light and its Decomposition into Component Plane Wavesp. 615
9.5 Effective Index of Refractionp. 619
9.6 TE Modesp. 620
9.7 Other Methods for Obtaining the Characteristic Equationsp. 622
9.8 Asymmetric Optical Guidep. 638
9.9 Coupled Guidesp. 643
Problemsp. 652
Referencesp. 654
10 Optical Waveguides and Devices for Integrated Opticsp. 655
10.1 Rectangular Optical Waveguidep. 655
10.2 Effective Index Method for Rectangular Optical Guidesp. 661
10.3 Coupling Between Rectangular Guidesp. 664
10.4 Conflectionp. 666
10.5 Various Kinds of Rectangular Optical Waveguides for Integrated Opticsp. 670
10.6 Power Dividersp. 673
10.7 Optical Magic Tp. 678
10.8 Electrode Structuresp. 680
10.9 Mode Converterp. 685
Problemsp. 688
Referencesp. 690
11 Modes and Dispersion in Optical Fibersp. 692
11.1 Practical Aspects of Optical Fibersp. 693
11.2 Theory of Step-Index Fibersp. 709
11.3 Field Distributions Inside Optical Fibersp. 730
11.4 Dual-Mode Fiberp. 739
11.5 Photoimprinted Bragg Grating Fiberp. 741
11.6 Definitions Associated with Dispersionp. 748
11.7 Dispersion-Shifted Fiberp. 749
11.8 Dispersion Compensatorp. 755
11.9 Ray Theory for Graded-Index Fibersp. 759
11.10 Fabrication of Optical Fibersp. 775
11.11 Cabling of Optical Fibersp. 783
11.12 Joining Fibersp. 786
Problemsp. 790
Referencesp. 793
12 Detecting Lightp. 796
12.1 Photomultiplier Tubep. 796
12.2 Streak Camerap. 798
12.3 Miscellaneous Types of Light Detectorsp. 800
12.4 PIN Photodiode and APDp. 801
12.5 Direct Detection Systemsp. 805
12.6 Coherent Detection Systemsp. 807
12.7 Balanced Mixerp. 814
12.8 Detection by Stimulated Effectsp. 815
12.9 Jitter in Coherent Communication Systemsp. 819
12.10 Coherent Detection Immune to Both Polarization and Phase Jitterp. 826
12.11 Concluding Remarksp. 830
Problemsp. 830
Referencesp. 831
13 Optical Amplifiersp. 833
13.1 Introductionp. 833
13.2 Basics of Optical Amplifiersp. 834
13.3 Types of Optical Amplifiersp. 836
13.4 Gain of Optical Fiber Amplifiersp. 838
13.5 Rate Equations for the Three-Level Model Of Er[superscript 3+]p. 848
13.6 Pros and Cons of 1.48-[mu]m and 0.98-[mu]m Pump Lightp. 853
13.7 Approximate Solutions of the Time-Dependent Rate Equationsp. 857
13.8 Pumping Configurationp. 864
13.9 Optimum Length of the Fiberp. 867
13.10 Electric Noise Power When the EDFA is Used as a Preamplifierp. 868
13.11 Noise Figure of the Receiver Using the Optical Amplifier as a Preamplifierp. 880
13.12 A Chain of Optical Amplifiersp. 882
13.13 Upconversion Fiber Amplifierp. 889
Problemsp. 889
Referencesp. 892
14 Transmittersp. 893
14.1 Types of Lasersp. 893
14.2 Semiconductor Lasersp. 895
14.3 Rate Equations of Semiconductor Lasersp. 909
14.4 Confinementp. 930
14.5 Wavelength Shift of the Radiationp. 943
14.6 Beam Pattern of a Lasterp. 946
14.7 Temperature Dependence of L-I Curvesp. 951
14.8 Semiconductor Laser Noisep. 952
14.9 Single-Frequency Lasersp. 956
14.10 Wavelength Tunable Laser Diodep. 970
14.11 Laser Diode Arrayp. 980
14.12 Multi-Quantum-Well Lasersp. 984
14.13 Erbium-Doped Fiber Laserp. 1004
14.14 Light-Emitting Diode (LED)p. 1007
14.15 Fiber Raman Lasersp. 1009
14.16 Selection of Light Sourcesp. 1011
Problemsp. 1013
Referencesp. 1014
15 Stationary and Solitary Solutions in a Nonlinear Mediump. 1017
15.1 Nonlinear (Kerr) Mediump. 1017
15.2 Solutions in the Unbounded Kerr Nonlinear Mediump. 1021
15.3 Guided Nonlinear Boundary Wavep. 1030
15.4 Linear Core Layer Sandwiched by Nonlinear Cladding Layersp. 1037
15.5 How the Soliton Came Aboutp. 1049
15.6 How a Soliton is Generatedp. 1050
15.7 Self-Phase Modulation (SPM)p. 1053
15.8 Group Velocity Dispersionp. 1055
15.9 Differential Equation of the Envelope Function of the Solitons in the Optical Fiberp. 1059
15.10 Solving the Nonlinear Schrodinger Equationp. 1067
15.11 Fundamental Solitonp. 1068
15.12 Pulsewidth and Power to Generate a Fundamental Solitonp. 1071
15.13 Ever-Expanding Soliton Theoriesp. 1074
Problemsp. 1077
Referencesp. 1079
16 Communicating by Fiber Opticsp. 1081
16.1 Overview of Fiber-Optic Communication Systemsp. 1082
16.2 Modulationp. 1085
16.3 Multiplexingp. 1097
16.4 Light Detection Systemsp. 1102
16.5 Noise in the Detector Systemp. 1113
16.6 Designing Fiber-Optic Communication Systemsp. 1129
Problemsp. 1147
Referencesp. 1149
Appendix A PIN Photodiode on an Atomic Scalep. 1151
A.1 PIN Photodiodep. 1151
A.2 I-V Characteristicsp. 1156
Appendix B Mode Densityp. 1160
Appendix C Perturbation Theoryp. 1164
Answers to Problemsp. 1167
Indexp. 1

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