Cover image for Killer whales
Title:
Killer whales
Author:
Carwardine, Mark.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First US edition.
Publication Information:
New York : DK Pub., 2001.
Physical Description:
96 pages : color illustrations, 1 color map ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780789482662
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Material Type
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Central Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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Newstead Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clearfield Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Collins Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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East Aurora Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eden Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Elma Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenilworth Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lancaster Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Riverside Branch Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library QL737.C432 C336 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

These four companion books take a dramatic look at our watery planet. For centuries, killer whales had a fearsome reputation as indiscriminate killers. In recent years we have realized that they are incredibly complex, endearing, and enigmatic creatures and do not deserve their killer name. We do not understand why, but unlike lions, tigers, and polar bears, they seem to be very careful not to harm people. Killer whales are the largest members of the dolphin family. Living in close-knit family groups known as pods, they are unmistakable with their distinctive jet-black and brilliant white markings and the tall, triangular dorsal fins of the males. They are most common in the cooler waters of the polar regions but can be seen almost anywhere. Best known for their supreme hunting abilities, they use their strength and some remarkable cooperative hunting strategies to tackle a wide variety of prey, including squid, fish, sea turtles, seabirds, sea lions, dolphins, and even whales several times larger than themselves. Killer whales are highly vocal animals and make a medley of weird and wonderful calls and whistles to communicate with one another. Killer Whales explores the surprising and awe-inspiring world of these amazing ocean predators, describing their daily lives and habits and examining their prospects for the future.


Author Notes

Mark Carwardine is a zoologist, writer, photographer, consultant, and broadcaster with a special interest in marine wildlife. In a voluntary capacity, he is dedicated to the work of several wildlife conservation organizations. He has written more than 40 books, including On the Trail of the Whale, Eyewitness Handbooks: Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises, Whale Watching in Iceland, The Guinness Book of Animal Records and (with Douglas Adams) the best-selling Last Chance to See.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Three new books not only accompany a BBC/Discovery Channel special that aired in January but also stand alone as nice introductions to their subjects. Dolphins examines a group of animals that are almost universally liked. Comprising 32 species of oceanic dolphins and 5 of river dolphins, these small whales are distributed worldwide. They share many characteristics, such as a "beaked" face and echolocation, which are discussed in four chapters. Anatomy, food gathering, and social behavior are investigated, revealing much about dolphin life. Interactions between dolphin and dolphin, dolphin and fish, and dolphin and human show the flexibility and ability to learn that rank dolphins among the brainiest of the planet's creatures. Killer whales are actually the largest of the dolphins but merit a book on their own. Famous from films and captive animals, killer whales are best known from long-term studies of pods (groups of whales) in coastal areas such as Puget Sound. Killer whales are found in two main types: "residents" live in large stable groups that hunt fish, and "transients" live in small groups and hunt whales and other marine mammals. The differences between these two types might actually mean that they are separate species. Extraordinary Fish illustrates the amazing variety in the most numerous and diverse vertebrate group on our planet. Concentrating on fish that "break the rules," the book examines fish that look like seaweed (leafy seadragon), are encased in a box (spotted trunkfish), catch prey by spitting water at it (archerfish), have no jaws (sea lamprey), and perch in trees (mudskippers). All three titles have a strong conservation message, both in the text and in sidebars, and sidebars also explain other concepts in more detail. All also end with a useful section of further information, including up-to-date Web sites. The combination of text and stunning illustrations makes all three valuable additions to any library. --Nancy Bent


School Library Journal Review

Adult/High School-Numerous color photographs, readable texts, and fun bits of trivia make this a solid introductory series for teens. Based on programs produced for the BBC/Discovery channel, Dolphins and Whales discuss anatomy, social structure, environment, food habits, echolocation, and relationship to humans with particular pleas for conservation and not theme parks. Fish covers environment, camouflage, ecology, electric fields, and mating. A star denotes a short bit of related trivia and elsewhere a triangle introduces a paragraph of similar information. Fully half of the space is devoted to the excellent-quality color photography; each picture is clearly labeled with a full sentence caption.-Claudia Moore, W. T. Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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