Cover image for The keys of hell
Title:
The keys of hell
Author:
Higgins, Jack, 1929-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Berkley Publishing Group : Penguin Putnam, Inc., 2001.
Physical Description:
264 pages ; 18 cm
General Note:
"Elements of this novel are taken from a novel of the same title published in 1965 under the pseudonym Martin Fallon, by Abelard-Schuman, London" -- verso page.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780425182680
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Adult Mass Market Paperback Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Central Library X Adult Mass Market Paperback Central Library
Searching...
Newstead Library X Adult Mass Market Paperback Open Shelf
Searching...
Anna M. Reinstein Library X Adult Mass Market Paperback Open Shelf
Searching...
Williamsville Library X Adult Mass Market Paperback Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

British expatriate Paul Chavasse is about as tough as they come. For years, he has made a dangerous living running men and intelligence across the Adriatic Sea from Italy to the communist country of Albania. But his ideals are about to be tested-more than he ever thought possible.The Albanian government, seeking to crush a religious resurgence within their borders, wants to find and destroy the Madonna of Scutari-a legendary statue of ebony and gold that has protected the faithful for a thousand years. Before government forces capture them, priests hide the carving deep in the marshes along the coast.Now, Paul Chavasse must outrun an entire army in a race to save the priceless relic-and the lives of thousands of believershellip;


Author Notes

Jack Higgins is a writer and educator, born in Newcastle, England on July 17, 1929. The name is the pseudonym of Harry Patterson. He also wrote under the names of Martin Fallon, James Graham, and Hugh Marlowe during his early writing career. He attended Leeds Training College and eventually graduated from the University of London in 1962 with a B.S. degree in Sociology.

Higgins held a series of jobs, including a stint as a non-commissioned officer in the Royal House of Guards serving on the German border during the Cold War. He taught at Leeds College of Commerce and James Graham College. He has written more than 60 books including The Eagle Has Landed, Touch the Devil, Confessional, The Eagle Has Flown, and Eye of the Storm. Higgins is also the author of the Sean Dillon series. His novels have since sold over 250 million copies and been translated into fifty-five languages.

His title's The Death Trade and Rain on the Dead made The New York Times Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

In an adventure originally published in 1972, Paul Chavasse is confronted by an angry New York mobster who reminds him of a hair-raising episode from his days as a spy. Years earlier, the Albanians, eager to impress the Communist Chinese, set a trap to capture and deliver Paul to them. Naturally, Paul becomes entangled but with his customary resource is able not only to escape but to retrieve a lost Madonna figurine. Reader Christian Rodska is successful in bringing the listener into the action; his voice becomes part of the tension as he lowers his pitch and speeds his pacing to describe Paul's stealth and daring. Rodska achieves a believable portrayal of women by not overdoing a high pitch, as so many male narrators do. This should be popular in most libraries.--Juleigh Muirhead Clark, John D. Rockefeller Jr. Lib., Colonial Williamsburg Fdn., VA (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

In an adventure originally published in 1972, Paul Chavasse is confronted by an angry New York mobster who reminds him of a hair-raising episode from his days as a spy. Years earlier, the Albanians, eager to impress the Communist Chinese, set a trap to capture and deliver Paul to them. Naturally, Paul becomes entangled but with his customary resource is able not only to escape but to retrieve a lost Madonna figurine. Reader Christian Rodska is successful in bringing the listener into the action; his voice becomes part of the tension as he lowers his pitch and speeds his pacing to describe Paul's stealth and daring. Rodska achieves a believable portrayal of women by not overdoing a high pitch, as so many male narrators do. This should be popular in most libraries. Juleigh Muirhead Clark, John D. Rockefeller Jr. Lib., Colonial Williamsburg Fdn., VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview