Cover image for Latinos : remaking America
Title:
Latinos : remaking America
Author:
Suárez-Orozco, Marcelo M., 1956-
Publication Information:
Berkeley : University of California Press, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xii, 490 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
"David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University."

Papers originally presented at the conference entitled Latinos in the 21st century : mapping the research agenda, held in April 2000 at Harvard University.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1480 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780520234864

9780520234871
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Call Number
Material Type
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Status
Central Library E184.S75 L37 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library E184.S75 L37 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Latinos are the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States and will comprise a quarter of the country's population by mid-century. The process of Latinization, the result of globalization and the biggest migration flow in the history of the Americas, is indeed reshaping the character of the U.S. This landmark book brings together some of the leading scholars now studying the social, cultural, racial, economic, and political changes wrought by the experiences, travails, and fortunes of the Latino population. It is the most definitive and comprehensive snapshot available of Latinos in the United States today.

How are Latinos and Latinas changing the face of the Americas? What is new and different about this current wave of migration? In this pathbreaking book social scientists, humanities scholars, and policy experts examine what every citizen and every student needs to know about Latinos in the U.S., covering issues from historical continuities and changes to immigration, race, labor, health, language, education, and politics. Recognizing the diversity and challenges facing Latinos in the U.S., this book addresses what it means to define the community as such and how to move forward on a variety of political and cultural fronts. All of the contributions to Latinos are original pieces written especially for this volume.


Summary

Latinos are the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States and will comprise a quarter of the country's population by mid-century. The process of Latinization, the result of globalization and the biggest migration flow in the history of the Americas, is indeed reshaping the character of the U.S. This landmark book brings together some of the leading scholars now studying the social, cultural, racial, economic, and political changes wrought by the experiences, travails, and fortunes of the Latino population. It is the most definitive and comprehensive snapshot available of Latinos in the United States today.

How are Latinos and Latinas changing the face of the Americas? What is new and different about this current wave of migration? In this pathbreaking book social scientists, humanities scholars, and policy experts examine what every citizen and every student needs to know about Latinos in the U.S., covering issues from historical continuities and changes to immigration, race, labor, health, language, education, and politics. Recognizing the diversity and challenges facing Latinos in the U.S., this book addresses what it means to define the community as such and how to move forward on a variety of political and cultural fronts. All of the contributions to Latinos are original pieces written especially for this volume.


Author Notes

Marcelo M. Suarez-Orozco, the Victor S. Thomas Professor of Education at Harvard University, is Co-Director of the Harvard Immigration Projects. He is author of many scholarly articles and books
Mariela M. Paez received her doctorate in education from Harvard in 2001. She is currently working as a researcher at Harvard University


Marcelo M. Suarez-Orozco, the Victor S. Thomas Professor of Education at Harvard University, is Co-Director of the Harvard Immigration Projects. He is author of many scholarly articles and books
Mariela M. Paez received her doctorate in education from Harvard in 2001. She is currently working as a researcher at Harvard University


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Suarez-Orozco's and Paez's superb collection of the latest social science scholarship by leaders in their fields was commissioned after a 2000 conference at Harvard University entitled "Latinos in the 21st Century: Mapping the Research Agenda." A central question drives the book: What do we know, and what do we need to know, about Latinos in the US? Disciplines addressed are sociology, education, anthropology, political science, religion, psychology, public health, and history. The commentary at the conclusion of each section is more honorific than necessary, and adds little to the content of the articles themselves. Despite this, the text is readable, interdisciplinary, comparative, and transnational/transgenerational in scope, reflecting the heterogeneity of Latino experience in the US. Three sociohistorical themes frame the essays: experiences of immigration; US relations with Latin American countries; and the process of racialization. Given the abysmal state of Latino high school completion rates, the articles on education, language acquisition, and employment outcomes are particularly relevant for all readers, and those by Wayne Cornelius and Robert C. Smith merit special attention. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels and collections. S. M. Green California State University--Chico


Choice Review

Suarez-Orozco's and Paez's superb collection of the latest social science scholarship by leaders in their fields was commissioned after a 2000 conference at Harvard University entitled "Latinos in the 21st Century: Mapping the Research Agenda." A central question drives the book: What do we know, and what do we need to know, about Latinos in the US? Disciplines addressed are sociology, education, anthropology, political science, religion, psychology, public health, and history. The commentary at the conclusion of each section is more honorific than necessary, and adds little to the content of the articles themselves. Despite this, the text is readable, interdisciplinary, comparative, and transnational/transgenerational in scope, reflecting the heterogeneity of Latino experience in the US. Three sociohistorical themes frame the essays: experiences of immigration; US relations with Latin American countries; and the process of racialization. Given the abysmal state of Latino high school completion rates, the articles on education, language acquisition, and employment outcomes are particularly relevant for all readers, and those by Wayne Cornelius and Robert C. Smith merit special attention. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels and collections. S. M. Green California State University--Chico


Table of Contents

Marcelo M. Suarez-Orozco and Mariela M. PaezGeorge J. SanchezJuan FloresAlex Stepick and Carol Dutton StepickJohn H. CoatsworthDiego VigilRobert C. SmithJohn Trumpbour and Elaine BernardMerilee S. GrindlePeggy LevittWayne A. CorneliusJacqueline Hagan and Nestor RodriguezMary WatersDavid E. Hayes-BautistaE. Richard Brown and Hongjian YuPaul FarmerPierrette Hondagneu-SoteloCelia Jaes FalicovRicardo C. AinslieCarola Suarez-OrozcoBarbara Zurer PearsonAna Celia ZentellaPatricia GandaraMaria S. Carlo and Catherine E. SnowLuis C. Moll and Richard RuizJorge ChapaGary OrfieldLouis DeSipio and Rodolfo O. de la GarzaLisa J. MontoyaJorge I. DominguezSilvio Torres-SaillantDoris SommerMarcelo M. Suarez-Orozco and Mariela M. PaezGeorge J. SanchezJuan FloresAlex Stepick and Carol Dutton StepickJohn H. CoatsworthDiego VigilRobert C. SmithJohn Trumpbour and Elaine BernardMerilee S. GrindlePeggy LevittWayne A. CorneliusJacqueline Hagan and Nestor RodriguezMary WatersDavid E. Hayes-BautistaE. Richard Brown and Hongjian YuPaul FarmerPierrette Hondagneu-SoteloCelia Jaes FalicovRicardo C. AinslieCarola Suarez-OrozcoBarbara Zurer PearsonAna Celia ZentellaPatricia GandaraMaria S. Carlo and Catherine E. SnowLuis C. Moll and Richard RuizJorge ChapaGary OrfieldLouis DeSipio and Rodolfo O. de la GarzaLisa J. MontoyaJorge I. DominguezSilvio Torres-SaillantDoris Sommer
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: The Research Agendap. 1
Part 1 Histories, Migrations, and Communitiesp. 39
1. "Y tu, que?" (Y2K): Latino History in the New Millenniump. 45
2. Islands and Enclaves: Caribbean Latinos in Historical Perspectivep. 59
3. Power and Identity: Miami Cubansp. 75
Commentaryp. 93
4. Community Dynamics and the Rise of Street Gangsp. 97
5. Gender, Ethnicity, and Race in School and Work Outcomes of Second-Generation Mexican Americansp. 110
6. Unions and Latinos: Mutual Transformationp. 126
Commentaryp. 146
7. Two Nations under God? Latino Religious Life in the United Statesp. 150
8. Ambivalent Reception: Mass Public Responses to the "New" Latino Immigration to the United Statesp. 165
9. Resurrecting Exclusion: The Effects of 1996 U.S. Immigration Reform on Communities and Families in Texas, El Salvador, and Mexicop. 190
Commentaryp. 202
Part 2 Health, Families, Languages, Education, and Politicsp. 207
10. The Latino Health Research Agenda for the Twenty-first Centuryp. 215
11. Latinos' Access to Employment-based Health Insurancep. 236
Commentaryp. 254
12. Families on the Frontier: From Braceros in the Fields to Braceras in the Homep. 259
13. Ambiguous Loss: Risk and Resilience in Latino Immigrant Familiesp. 274
14. The Plasticity of Culture and Psychodynamic and Psychosocial Processes in Latino Immigrant Familiesp. 289
Commentaryp. 302
15. Bilingual Infants: Mapping the Research Agendap. 306
16. Latin@ Languages and Identitiesp. 321
17. Learning English in California: Guideposts for the Nationp. 339
Commentaryp. 359
18. The Schooling of Latino Childrenp. 362
19. Affirmative Action, X Percent Plans, and Latino Access to Higher Education in the Twenty-first Centuryp. 375
Commentaryp. 389
20. Forever Seen as New: Latino Participation in American Electionsp. 398
21. Gender and Citizenship in Latino Political Participationp. 410
Commentaryp. 430
Epilogue: Problematic Paradigms: Racial Diversity and Corporate Identity in the Latino Communityp. 435
After Word: American Projectionsp. 457
Notes on Contributorsp. 463
Indexp. 467
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: The Research Agendap. 1
Part 1 Histories, Migrations, and Communitiesp. 39
1. "Y tu, que?" (Y2K): Latino History in the New Millenniump. 45
2. Islands and Enclaves: Caribbean Latinos in Historical Perspectivep. 59
3. Power and Identity: Miami Cubansp. 75
Commentaryp. 93
4. Community Dynamics and the Rise of Street Gangsp. 97
5. Gender, Ethnicity, and Race in School and Work Outcomes of Second-Generation Mexican Americansp. 110
6. Unions and Latinos: Mutual Transformationp. 126
Commentaryp. 146
7. Two Nations under God? Latino Religious Life in the United Statesp. 150
8. Ambivalent Reception: Mass Public Responses to the "New" Latino Immigration to the United Statesp. 165
9. Resurrecting Exclusion: The Effects of 1996 U.S. Immigration Reform on Communities and Families in Texas, El Salvador, and Mexicop. 190
Commentaryp. 202
Part 2 Health, Families, Languages, Education, and Politicsp. 207
10. The Latino Health Research Agenda for the Twenty-first Centuryp. 215
11. Latinos' Access to Employment-based Health Insurancep. 236
Commentaryp. 254
12. Families on the Frontier: From Braceros in the Fields to Braceras in the Homep. 259
13. Ambiguous Loss: Risk and Resilience in Latino Immigrant Familiesp. 274
14. The Plasticity of Culture and Psychodynamic and Psychosocial Processes in Latino Immigrant Familiesp. 289
Commentaryp. 302
15. Bilingual Infants: Mapping the Research Agendap. 306
16. Latin@ Languages and Identitiesp. 321
17. Learning English in California: Guideposts for the Nationp. 339
Commentaryp. 359
18. The Schooling of Latino Childrenp. 362
19. Affirmative Action, X Percent Plans, and Latino Access to Higher Education in the Twenty-first Centuryp. 375
Commentaryp. 389
20. Forever Seen as New: Latino Participation in American Electionsp. 398
21. Gender and Citizenship in Latino Political Participationp. 410
Commentaryp. 430
Epilogue: Problematic Paradigms: Racial Diversity and Corporate Identity in the Latino Communityp. 435
After Word: American Projectionsp. 457
Notes on Contributorsp. 463
Indexp. 467

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