Cover image for Imani all mine
Title:
Imani all mine
Author:
Porter, Connie Rose, 1959-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First Mariner Books edition.
Publication Information:
Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2000.

©1999
Physical Description:
218 pages ; 21 cm
General Note:
"A Mariner book."

"Discussion guide included"--Cover.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
580 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 3.9 9.0 35266.

Reading Counts RC High School 6.1 16 Quiz: 22114 Guided reading level: NR.
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780618056781
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

"With authority and grace" (Essence), Imani All Mine tells the story of Tasha, a fourteen-year-old unwed mother of a baby girl. In her ghettoized world where poverty, racism, and danger are daily struggles, Tasha uses her savvy and humor to uncover the good hidden around her. The name she gives her daughter, Imani, is a sign of her determination and fundamental trust despite the odds against her: Imani means faith. Surrounding Tasha and Imani is a cast of memorable characters: Peanut,the boy Tasha likes, Eboni, her best friend, Miss Odetta, the neighborhood gossip, and Tasha's mother, Earlene, who's dating a new boyfriend.
Tasha's voice speaks directly to both the special pain of poverty and the universal, unconquerable spirit of youth. Authentic in every detail, this is an unforgettable story. As Seventeen declared, "Porter's candid narrative will have you hooked from the opening sentence."


Author Notes

Adult/young adult author Connie Porter was born in Buffalo, New York, where she started pursuing a writing career in high school.

Porter began her career by writing articles for magazines and book reviews in newspapers. She then went on to write the novels All-Bright Court and Imani All Mine. (Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

This deceptively simple novel pulls the reader into the life of an inner-city teenage girl who has had a baby. Tasha tells her poignant story in street lingo, slowly revealing that she's not some promiscuous teen but a rape victim. Her baby, Imani, is her lifeline, hers exclusively, with no resemblance to the rapist. When Tasha discovers that he is enrolled at her school, she's terrified until she realizes that he doesn't know her. He doesn't recognize the anonymous girl he picked up at a skating rink, lured away, and raped. When her terror turns to rage, Tasha wishes for his death. But her baby dies instead, killed by a stray bullet fired through their apartment, and Tasha struggles with feelings of guilt. Through Tasha's stark voice, Porter offers well-drawn characters, reflecting the limited expectations of impoverished inner-city life, and the hopes bestowed on children by their teenage mothers. Porter is the author of All-Bright Court (1991). Vanessa Bush


Publisher's Weekly Review

"The doctor say she see it every day, babies having babies." Fifteen-year-old Tasha Dawson narrates a tale of teenage motherhood in Porter's second adult novel (after All-Bright Court). Balancing her honor-roll grades with the perils of surviving inner-city Buffalo, N.Y., Tasha gives birth to Imani‘a child conceived in violence and given a name that means "faith." . The young mother expresses a powerful, protective love for her daughter even as she herself negotiates her existence among drug dealers and bigoted authorities and explores her own adolescent sexuality. She struggles to understand her mother's new relationship with a white man; her own desires, shame and pride; and the nature of a God who is both merciless and loved. Just when Tasha appears to have found a place for herself with Imani and in school, her world is devastated by a flash of injustice that changes her life forever. Porter spins the tale in a series of flashbacks, telling Tasha's story in a nonlinear fashion and with a bold dialect, mirroring the survival strategies of indirection that Tasha employs in her complex navigation of young adulthood, motherhood and urban life. Porter is also known as a young-adult fiction writer (the Addy books in the American Girls series), and at times this novel slips uncomfortably into YA simplicity, especially in its resolutely uplifting final scenes, which offer an almost cloyingly spiritual happy ending to Tasha's complicated, earthbound story. Author tour. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Grab your hankie for this story of a 15-year-old teen mom whose baby is everything she has. "Imani all mine." Imani was conceived during a violent rape, but her mother, Tasha, can see nothing of the rapist in her. Through Tasha's eyes, we view a very harsh world-one filled with drunks, crack dealers, and gang violence. Why It Is for Us: This tight, first-person narrative strays to the melodramatic in the end, but by then the reader is hooked. As adults, we might not understand Tasha's final decision, but there is no denying the pain the circumstances that bring her to it. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

YA-Imani's name means "faith," and her mother, Tasha, is a 15-year-old African-American high school honors student. Tasha's mother is emotionally distant and the teen resolutely turns away from the attempts of other well-meaning adults to help her. Gradually, it emerges that Imani was conceived as the result of a rape, but Tasha cannot see anything of the hated father in the baby. Daily occurrences include gunfire, encounters with crack dealers, cleaning up after her mother's alcoholic friend, and her first willing sexual encounters (with a boy as confused as she is). Porter tells this story entirely in dialect, and although the lack of quotation marks sometimes creates confusion, for the most part the narrative draws readers into this teenager's life. The author is particularly successful at portraying adults: teachers, relatives, and neighbors are believably and often amusingly complex even while Tasha's view of them remains that of a child. In an emotionally wrenching ending, Imani is killed, the victim of gang violence, whereupon Tasha finds faith of a different sort through her community. In a final twist that makes sense allegorically even while it is perhaps the most inexplicable development of all, Tasha chooses to become pregnant again. Whether seen as a tale of hopelessness or "faith," this tale is sure to find a passionate readership among teens, who will hear a kindred spirit in Tasha's vivid, unforgettable voice.-Christine C. Menefee, Fairfax County Public Library, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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