Cover image for The price of dissent : testimonies to political repression in America
Title:
The price of dissent : testimonies to political repression in America
Author:
Schultz, Bud.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Berkeley : University of California Press, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xi, 468 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
The unrelenting campaign against the industrial workers of the world / Fred Thompson -- African American sharecroppers: repression as a way of life / George Stith -- Prewar Red scare: holding militant teamsters at bay / Harry Deboer and Jake Cooper -- Postwar tests of loyalty: attempts to silence autoworkers' spokesman / Stanley Nowak -- Imposing Cold War orthodoxy: a teachers union under attack / Mildred Grossman -- The purge of the left: expelling international unions form the CIO / Ernest DeMaio -- A Pittsburgh story: two rank-and-file labor leaders and a labor priest / Margaret (Peg) Stasik, Charles Owen Rice, Joseph (Sonny) Robinson -- The local P-9 meatpackers, strike, Austin, Minnesota / Local P-9 strikers and supporters: Cecil Cain ... [et al.] -- Eradicating a powerful, defiant voice form the American consciousness / Paul Robeson, Jr. -- Facing up to southern terror / Walter Bergman, John Lewis, Fred Shouttlesworth -- In the midst of the storm / Anne Braden -- The crucible of Lowndes county, Alabama, and emergent Black power / Johnny Jackson, Kswame Ture (Stokely Carmichael) -- The assault of the Black Panther party: the murder of Fred Hampton / Ron Satchel, Akua Njeri (Deborah Johnson), Flint Taylor -- Undercutting African American elected officials / Mervyn Dymally -- HUAC and the irrepressible women strike for peace / Dagma Wilson -- Berkeley's free speech movement: a prelude / Jackie Goldberg -- Harassing antiwar demonstrators / Norma Becker -- HUAC, the police, the FBI, the courts: containing an extraordinary generation / Abbie Hoffman -- Retribution for acts of conscience / Daniel Ellsberg, Samuel Popkin -- The shootings at Kent State / Roseann (Chic) Canfora and Alsna Canfora -- The FBI and the committee in solidarity with the people of El Salvador / Jack Ryan [et al.] -- Holding the Chicago Red Squad accountable / Chicago Red Squad targets: Richard (Rick) Gutman ... [et al.].
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780520224018

9780520224025
Format :
Book

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Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library JC599.U5 S393 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Bud and Ruth Schultz's vivid oral history presents the extraordinary testimony of people who experienced government repression and persecution firsthand. Drawn from three of the most significant social movements of our time--the labor, Black freedom, and antiwar movements--these engrossing interviews bring to life the experiences of Americans who acted upon their beliefs despite the price they paid for their dissent. In doing so, they--and the movements they were part of--helped shape the political and social landscape of the United States from the beginning to the end of the twentieth century.

The majority of the voices in this book belong to everyday people--workers, priests, teachers, students--but more well-known figures such as Congressman John Lewis, Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael), Abbie Hoffman, and Daniel Ellsberg are also included. There are firsthand accounts by leaders of the Industrial Workers of the World, active early in the century; Southern Tenant Farmers Union of the 1930s; Women's Strike for Peace, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; Berkeley's Free Speech Movement of the 1950s and 1960s; and the Hormel meatpackers' Local P-9 in the 1980s. Lively introductions by the authors contextualize these personal statements.

Those who tell their stories in The Price of Dissent, and others like them, faced surveillance and disruption from police agencies, such as the FBI; brutalization by local police; local ordinances and court injunctions limiting protest; inquisitions into beliefs and associations by congressional committees; prosecution under laws that curbed dissent; denaturalization and deportation; and purges under government loyalty programs. Agree with them or not, by dissenting when it was unpopular or dangerous to do so, they insisted on exercising the precious American right of free expression and preserved it for a new century's dissenters.


Summary

Bud and Ruth Schultz's vivid oral history presents the extraordinary testimony of people who experienced government repression and persecution firsthand. Drawn from three of the most significant social movements of our time--the labor, Black freedom, and antiwar movements--these engrossing interviews bring to life the experiences of Americans who acted upon their beliefs despite the price they paid for their dissent. In doing so, they--and the movements they were part of--helped shape the political and social landscape of the United States from the beginning to the end of the twentieth century.

The majority of the voices in this book belong to everyday people--workers, priests, teachers, students--but more well-known figures such as Congressman John Lewis, Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael), Abbie Hoffman, and Daniel Ellsberg are also included. There are firsthand accounts by leaders of the Industrial Workers of the World, active early in the century; Southern Tenant Farmers Union of the 1930s; Women's Strike for Peace, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; Berkeley's Free Speech Movement of the 1950s and 1960s; and the Hormel meatpackers' Local P-9 in the 1980s. Lively introductions by the authors contextualize these personal statements.

Those who tell their stories in The Price of Dissent, and others like them, faced surveillance and disruption from police agencies, such as the FBI; brutalization by local police; local ordinances and court injunctions limiting protest; inquisitions into beliefs and associations by congressional committees; prosecution under laws that curbed dissent; denaturalization and deportation; and purges under government loyalty programs. Agree with them or not, by dissenting when it was unpopular or dangerous to do so, they insisted on exercising the precious American right of free expression and preserved it for a new century's dissenters.


Author Notes

Bud Schultz is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Trinity College, and Ruth Schultz is an independent scholar. They are the authors of It Did Happen Here: Recollections of Political Repression in America (California, 1989).


Bud Schultz is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Trinity College, and Ruth Schultz is an independent scholar. They are the authors of It Did Happen Here: Recollections of Political Repression in America (California, 1989).


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

In their earlier work, It Did Happen Here: Recollections of Political Repression in America (1989), the Schultzes profiled activists from a variety of social movements. In this follow-up book, they focus on activists in three of the "most dramatic, sustained" social movements of the twentieth century: the labor, civil rights, and antiwar movements. They begin each section with an overview of the particular movement and a brief history of the interview subjects. What is most compelling are the voices of the more than 100 activists, from the fairly obscure to the famous, including Paul Robeson Jr. remembering his father's activism, John Lewis, Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael), and Abbie Hoffman. The activists recall the courage needed to stand up to resistance from the police and the government (from the FBI to Congress and the White House), and the struggle to overcome violence and accusations of treachery and subversion. A fascinating collection of memories of dissenting voices in America. --Vanessa Bush


Choice Review

Bud Schultz (emer., Trinity College) and Ruth Schultz offer a companion volume to their earlier, It Did Happen Here (1989). The earlier book was a collection of firsthand accounts of activism and political repression. Here, the authors provide a more in-depth treatment of "three of the most dramatic, sustained social movements of the twentieth century": the labor movement, the Civil Rights Movement, and the anti-Vietnam War movement. Examples of "political repression" include overt coercion and more subtle forms of infiltration aimed at disrupting and dividing social movements or undermining the credibility of movement leaders. An insightful introduction and conclusion, along with a short prologue to each of the sets of interviews give historical background and theoretical orientation to the issues. A notable group of contributors was assembled, including Fred Thompson, CIO organizers, Stokely Carmichael, Abbie Hoffman, and Daniel Ellsberg, among others. The firsthand accounts reveal in concrete detail the great lengths to which the US government has gone to silence those engaged in lawful dissent. Extensively researched and well written, this book shows how government repression not only targets "fringe" or "radical" movements but attributes stigmatized beliefs to more moderate and mainstream groups to provide "a rationalization for launching assaults against this broader range of activists." General readers through researchers. C. W. Barrow University of Massachusetts Dartmouth


Booklist Review

In their earlier work, It Did Happen Here: Recollections of Political Repression in America (1989), the Schultzes profiled activists from a variety of social movements. In this follow-up book, they focus on activists in three of the "most dramatic, sustained" social movements of the twentieth century: the labor, civil rights, and antiwar movements. They begin each section with an overview of the particular movement and a brief history of the interview subjects. What is most compelling are the voices of the more than 100 activists, from the fairly obscure to the famous, including Paul Robeson Jr. remembering his father's activism, John Lewis, Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael), and Abbie Hoffman. The activists recall the courage needed to stand up to resistance from the police and the government (from the FBI to Congress and the White House), and the struggle to overcome violence and accusations of treachery and subversion. A fascinating collection of memories of dissenting voices in America. --Vanessa Bush


Choice Review

Bud Schultz (emer., Trinity College) and Ruth Schultz offer a companion volume to their earlier, It Did Happen Here (1989). The earlier book was a collection of firsthand accounts of activism and political repression. Here, the authors provide a more in-depth treatment of "three of the most dramatic, sustained social movements of the twentieth century": the labor movement, the Civil Rights Movement, and the anti-Vietnam War movement. Examples of "political repression" include overt coercion and more subtle forms of infiltration aimed at disrupting and dividing social movements or undermining the credibility of movement leaders. An insightful introduction and conclusion, along with a short prologue to each of the sets of interviews give historical background and theoretical orientation to the issues. A notable group of contributors was assembled, including Fred Thompson, CIO organizers, Stokely Carmichael, Abbie Hoffman, and Daniel Ellsberg, among others. The firsthand accounts reveal in concrete detail the great lengths to which the US government has gone to silence those engaged in lawful dissent. Extensively researched and well written, this book shows how government repression not only targets "fringe" or "radical" movements but attributes stigmatized beliefs to more moderate and mainstream groups to provide "a rationalization for launching assaults against this broader range of activists." General readers through researchers. C. W. Barrow University of Massachusetts Dartmouth


Table of Contents

Jack Ryan and Peggy Ryan and Linda Hajek and Jose Rinaldi-Jovet
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Targets of Political Repression in Twentieth-Century America
1 Part One Subverting the Organization of Labor Prologue: Attacks on Labor Before the Triumph of Industrial Unions
The Unrelenting Campaign Against the Industrial Workers of the WorldFred Thompson
African American Sharecroppers: Repression as a Way of LifeGeorge Stith
Ideological Assaults: Labor at Mid-Century Prewar Red Scare: Holding Militant Teamsters at BayHarry DeBoer and Jake Cooper
Postwar Tests of Loyalty: Attempts to Silence an Auto Workers' SpokesmanStanley Nowak
Imposing Cold War Orthodoxy: A Teachers Union Under AttackMildred Grossman
The Purge of the Left: Expelling International Unions from the CIOErnest DeMaio
A Pittsburgh Story: Two Rank-and-File Labor Leaders and a Labor PriestMargaret (Peg)
Stasik Monsignor CharlesOwen Rice Joseph (Sonny)
Robinson Epilogue: Cracking Down on New Voices of Union Militancy
The Local P-9 Meatpackers Strike, Austin, Minnesota Local P-9 Strikers and Supporters: Cecil Cain, Pete Winkels, Jim Guyette, Denny Mealy, Ray Rogers, Carol Kough, and Emily Bass
2 Part Two Suppressing the Black Freedom Struggle
Prologue: Cold War Constraints on African Americans' Demands for Freedom Eradicating a Powerful, Defiant Voice from the American ConsciousnessPaul Robeson Jr.
The Black Freedom Movement Under Siege Facing Up to Southern TerrorWalter Bergman and John Lewis Reverend and Fred Shuttlesworth
In the Midst of the StormAnne Braden
The Crucible of Lowndes County, Alabama, and Emergent Black PowerJohnny Jackson Kwame Ture and Stokely Carmichael
The Assault on the Black Panther Party: The Murder of Fred HamptonRon Satchel and Akua Njeri and Deborah Johnson
Flint Taylor Epilogue: Voter Rights Revisited Undercutting African American Elected Officials Mervyn Dymally
3 Part Three Silencing Opponents of War Prologue: Tainting the Antinuclear Movement HUAC and the Irrepressible Women Strike for PeaceDagmar Wilson
The Vietnam Era: The War Against the Peacemakers Berkeley's Free Speech Movement: A Prelude Jackie Goldberg Harassing Antiwar DemonstratorsNorma Becker
HUAC, the Police, the FBI, the Courts: Containing an Extraordinary GenerationAbbie Hoffman
Retribution for Acts of ConscienceDaniel Ellsberg and Samuel Popkin
The Shootings at Kent StateRoseann (Chic)
Canfora and Alan Canfora Epilogue: The Heresy of a Modern-Day Social Gospel
The FBI and the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvadorp. 4
Part Four Preserving the Right to Dissent
A Notable Reversal: Holding the Chicago Red Squad Accountable Chicago Red Squad Targets: Richard (Rick) GutmanJohn Hill and Jack Spiegel and Janet Nolan and Father Donald Headley
Notes
Index
Acknowledgments
1 Introduction: Targets of Political Repression in Twentieth-Century America 1 Part One
The Unrelenting Campaign Against the Industrial Workers of the World
African American Sharecroppers: Repression as a Way of LifeFred Thompson
Ideological Assaults: Labor at Mid-Century Prewar Red Scare: Holding Militant Teamsters at BayGeorge Stith
Tests of Loyalty: Attempts to Silence an Auto Workers' SpokesmanHarry DeBoer and Jake Cooper Postwar
Imposing Cold War Orthodoxy: A Teachers Union Under AttackStanley Nowak
The Purge of the Left: Expelling International Unions from the CIOMildred Grossman
A Pittsburgh Story: Two Rank-and-File Labor Leaders and a Labor PriestErnest DeMaio
Margaret (Peg) Stasik Monsignor Charles Owen Rice Joseph (Sonny) Robinson Epilogue: Cracking Down on New Voices of Union Militancy
The Local P-9 Meatpackers Strike, Austin, Minnesota
Local P-9 Strikers and SupportersCecil Cain and Pete Winkels and Jim Guyette and Denny Mealy and Ray Rogers and Carol Kough and Emily Bass
2 Suppressing the Black Freedom Struggle
Prologue: Cold War Constraints on African Americans' Demands for Freedom Eradicating a Powerful, Defiant Voice from the American Consciousness
The Black Freedom Movement Under Siege Facing Up to Southern TerrorPaul Robeson Jr.
Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth In the Midst of the StormWalter Bergman and John Lewis
The Crucible of Lowndes County, Alabama, and Emergent Black PowerAnne Braden
Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael) The Assault on the Black Panther Party: The Murder of Fred HamptonJohnny Jackson
Voter Rights Revisited Undercutting African American Elected OfficialsRon Satchel Akua Njeri and Deborah Johnson and Flint Taylor Epilogue
Mervyn Dymally
3 Silencing Opponents of War
Prologue: Tainting the Antinuclear Movement HUAC and the Irrepressible Women Strike for Peace
The Vietnam Era: The War Against the Peacemakers Berkeley's Free Speech Movement: A Prelude Jackie Goldberg Harassing Antiwar DemonstratorsDagmar Wilson
HUAC, the Police, the FBI, the Courts: Containing an Extraordinary GenerationNorma Becker
Retribution for Acts of ConscienceAbbie Hoffman
The Shootings at Kent StateDaniel Ellsberg and Samuel Popkin
Roseann (Chic) Canfora and Alan Canfora Epilogue: The Heresy of a Modern-Day Social Gospel The FBI and the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador
Jack RyanPeggy Ryan Linda Hajek and Jose Rinaldi-Jovet
4 Preserving the Right to Dissent
A Notable Reversal: Holding the Chicago Red Squad Accountable
Chicago Red Squad TargetsRichard (Rick) Gutman and John Hill and Jack Spiegel and Janet Nolan and Father Donald Headley
Notes
Index

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