Cover image for Healing words for the body, mind, and spirit : 101 words to inspire and affirm
Title:
Healing words for the body, mind, and spirit : 101 words to inspire and affirm
Author:
Goldman, Caren.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Marlowe & Co., [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xxiii, 214 pages ; 19 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781569245859
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library BL65.M4 G65 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Healing Words for the Body, Mind and Spirit offers inspiration and illumination to everyone on the path toward physical, emotional, psychological, and spiritual healing. Veteran spirituality writer Goldman offers 101 compelling words -- each accompanied by inspiring quotations, a central illustrative story, and an affirmation that, taken together, illustrate and evoke that word's special healing powers. Beautifully designed, and with quotes and stories drawn from a wide variety of traditions and sources, Healing Words for the Body, Mind and Spirit is sure to become a beloved volume of wisdom and guidance.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Chapter One Abundance a great or plentiful amount; fullness to overflowing * * * A man there was, though some did count him mad, The more he cast away, The more he had. John Bunyan When we choose not to focus on what is missing from our lives but are grateful for the abundance that's present ... the wasteland of illusion falls away and we experience Heaven on earth. Sarah Ban Breathnach Abundance is not a question of how much one has but of what one's attitude is toward what one has.... The experience of abundance cannot be found at the discursive or even at the emotional level. It must be experienced within the body. Rick Jarow My husband, Ted, is a minister in a large inner-city church. Whenever the subject of abundance comes up, he's apt to tell a story about a woman named Roslyn who visited on a Sunday when the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt was displayed in the church. Silently, as she sat before 16-foot sections of the tapestry that's helped millions of people to grieve the loss of friends, loved ones, and strangers who have died of AIDS, Roslyn seemed oblivious to the choir, clergy, and others who scurried around her.     That morning, Ted's sermon was about living out of abundance and sharing one's resources. "Our neighbors are having a very difficult time this year because of cold temperatures and welfare cuts," he said. "Daily, they knock on our doors for help."     After the service, Ted stopped to greet Roslyn, but she brushed him off. "I couldn't leave any money in the collection plate, but I did put in something else," she said before leaving. Moments later, an usher handed Roslyn's envelope to Ted. "This is all I have," the note inside began. "It is the last of what I received before getting a job. I'm sure that someone else needs them more than I do."     Enclosed were her food stamps.     Author Henry Miller tells us that the one desire that grows more and more is to give. "Giving and receiving are at bottom one thing, dependent upon whether one lives open or closed. Living openly one becomes a medium, a transmitter; living thus, as a river, one experiences life to the full, flows along with the current of life, and dies in order to live again as an ocean." * * * AFFIRMATION I am grateful for the places where I feel abundance in my life. * * * Riches are not from abundance of worldly goods, but from a contented mind. Mohammed He who knows enough is enough will always have enough. Lao-Tzu Acceptance the act or process of accepting * * * Inside yourself or outside, you never have to change what you see, only the way you see it. Thaddeus Golas You play the hand you're dealt. I think the game's worthwhile. Christopher Reeve Never deny a diagnosis, but do deny the negative verdict that may go with it. Norman Cousins An old Zen story goes like this: An old Chinese farmer had a mare that broke through the fence and ran away. When his neighbors learned of it, they came to the farmer and said, "What bad luck this is. You don't have a horse during planting season." The farmer listened and then replied, "Bad luck, good luck. Who knows?"     A few days later, the mare returned with two stallions. When the neighbors learned of it, they visited the firmer. "You are now a rich man. What good fortune this is," they said. The firmer listened and again replied, "Good fortune, bad fortune. Who knows?"     Later that day, the farmer's only son was thrown from one of the stallions and broke his leg. When the neighbors heard about it, they came to the farmer. "It is planting season and now there is no one to help you," they said. "This is truly bad luck." The farmer listened, and once more he said, "Bad luck, good luck. Who knows?"     The very next day, the emperor's army rode into the town and conscripted the eldest son in every family. Only the farmer's son with his broken leg remained behind. Soon the neighbors arrived. Tearfully, they said, "Yours is the only son who was not taken from his family and sent to war. What good fortune this is...." * * * AFFIRMATION More and more I know I can acknowledge and accept what I feel, without criticism or blame. * * * I dance to the tune that is played. Spanish proverb You have to take it as it happens, but you should try to make it happen the way you want to take it. German proverb Atone to make amends or reparation for an injury or wrong; to expiate. * * * What is past is past, there is a future left to all who have the energy to atone. Edward G. Bulwer The beginning of atonement is the sense of its necessity. Lord Byron The purpose of healing is to bring us in harmony with ourselves. O. Carl Simonton I find the archaic definition of the word atone anything but outdated. Rooted in the Middle English word atonen , it once meant "to reconcile or harmonize" and had none of the breast-beating baggage the contemporary usage can carry. "To reconcile or harmonize"--how appropriate those words feel, since atone literally breaks down into two simple words-- at one .     What does it mean to be "at one" with oneself, especially when we're ill or feeling ill at ease? If I know I am not "at one" because of hurts that I've caused another or acts I've committed that leave me uncomfortable, fragmented, or guilty, what must I do to heal those schisms?     Many years ago, Owen Ringwald told me a story that led me to a path of reconciliation. I met Owen at a human relations training workshop, where he was facilitating my group. Outside the workshop, we shared some meals and quiet walks and discovered we had many paths and friends in common. Months later, Owen and his wife, Mary, came to visit us in Ohio on their way from Delaware to their son Alan's home in Indiana.     The next morning, as we rocked back and forth on the swing on our porch, I asked Owen, then in his seventies, a question that I can't remember now. However, his answer changed my life. Owen began talking about Alan and said, "I had bypass surgery recently. Beforehand, Alan kept calling and insisting he wanted to fly in to be with me. `It's not necessary,' I kept telling him. `You don't have to be here.' But he persisted until I finally said, `Alan, whatever the outcome, it will be okay. I love you, and I have no unfinished business with you.'"     Unfinished business. Why does unfinished business with another keep us from being "at one" with ourselves? What must we do to finish unfinished business with others--spouses, parents, children, relatives, friends, and adversaries both living and dead? Owen left later that day, and we never saw each other again. Yet, each time I tell his story, it reminds me that before I can know the healing that comes with being "at one" with myself, I must complete my unfinished business and be reconciled to others. * * * AFFIRMATION More and more I'm aware of my unfinished business with others and myself. * * * On the day of atonement--you shall have the trumpet sounded throughout all your land. Leviticus 25:9 The hidden harmony is stronger than the visible. Heraclitus Attitude a state of mind or a feeling; disposition; a general cast of mind * * * Keep your face to the sunshine and you cannot see the shadows. Helen Keller We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread. They may have been few in number, but they offer sufficient proof that everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms--to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances. Victor Frankl Attitude is everything. Mae West lived into her eighties believing she was twenty, and it never occurred to her that her arithmetic was lousy. Soundings We often hear that attitude is everything and that it's important to have a positive one. However, for many people suffering from physical, emotional or spiritual disease , the call to have one overarching state of mind may be disheartening. Might we not feel more aligned with ourselves if we abandon the quest for one idealized attitude? That way we can give ourselves permission not only to hope for a positive outcome, but to have attitudes that are gracious, kind, loving, upbeat, confident, forgiving, bitter, angry, melancholy, depressed, fearful, gloomy, pessimistic , or even horrible , too. In the book The Feminine Face of God , Sherry Andersen and Patricia Hopkins write, "An attitude of 'not-knowing' can be like rain falling on the hard-packed soil of our lives. If we are willing, it can soften us, so we can feel gratitude and compassion and our own human vulnerability."     Author Dan Millman often tells the following story about the healing power of a courageous boy's willing and eager attitudes. According to Millman, there was a little girl in a California hospital who suffered from a rare, life-threatening disease. Her only chance of recovery depended upon a blood transfusion from her five-year-old brother. Miraculously, the boy had survived the same disease and now had the antibodies to combat it. The doctor explained the situation to the little boy and then asked him whether or not he would be willing to give his sister his blood. He only hesitated for a moment before taking a deep breath and saying, "Yes, I'll do it if it will save Liz."     During the transfusion, the boy lay in bed and smiled as the color returned to Liz's cheeks. Then his face grew pale. With a trembling voice he asked the doctor, "Will I start to die right away?" Being so young, he had misunderstood the doctor. He thought he was going to have to give his sister all of his blood. * * * AFFIRMATION My willingness to acknowledge all my attitudes helps awaken me to my potential to heal my wounds. * * * A clever person turns great troubles into little ones and little ones into none at all. Chinese proverb The dog that wags its tail won't be beaten. Japanese proverb Excerpted from Healing Words for the Body, Mind and Spirit by Caren Goldman. Copyright © 2001 by Caren Goldman. Excerpted by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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