Cover image for Honeybees
Title:
Honeybees
Author:
Heiligman, Deborah.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Washington, D.C. : National Geographic Society, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
31 pages : color illustrations ; 24 x 28 cm.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.1 0.5 64967.
Added Author:
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9780792266785
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clarence Library QL568.A6 H388 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clearfield Library QL568.A6 H388 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library QL568.A6 H388 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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North Collins Library QL568.A6 H388 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Williamsville Library QL568.A6 H388 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Honeybees are astonishing insects, at work in one way or another from their very early days. In this fun and fact-filled picture book, Deborah Heiligman follows the life of one busy worker bee as it moves from job to job in the hive, at each phase with a different set of duties that help keep the community going. As a nurse bee, the worker bee feeds the larva, nourishing the young bees into their adult state. Guard bees protect the hive, warning of intruders like bears or wasps, and fighting off robber bees from other hives that come to steal honey. As a forager bee, she'll fly long distances to find nectar for the hive in flowers, pollinating other plants as she goes. The constant activity of the bees and their incredible sense of community keeps the reader busy - learning about these insects who do so much more than sting.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-Young readers will be awed by the amount of information packed into this brief book. The bold, gouache illustrations reinforce the hard work and myriad tasks described. From the opening pages, bees are shown on the move, gathering nectar, feeding larvae, maturing, cleaning and polishing cells, making wax, taking care of the queen, unloading nectar, and guarding the hives. Like the bees, readers jump from one concept to another and may become confused by the changing roles and stages, not realizing that a worker bee and a forager bee are the same. There is also some confusion between the diagrams and the text. The text refers to a bee's tongue whereas the diagram shows only a proboscis. Heiligman also states that bees use every part of their body to do their work but no mention is made of the role of the thorax, forelegs, or compound eye. Nonetheless, readers will learn how bees communicate, the role of royal jelly, and just how hardworking honeybees really are. An attractive addition.-Edith Ching, St. Albans School, Mt. St. Alban, Washington, DC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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