Cover image for Collected poetry and prose
Title:
Collected poetry and prose
Author:
Stevens, Wallace, 1879-1955.
Uniform Title:
Works. Selections. 1997
Publication Information:
New York : Library of America : Distributed to the trade in the U.S. by Penguin Books, [1997]

©1997
Physical Description:
xxii, 1032 pages ; 21 cm.
General Note:
Includes indexes.
Language:
English
Contents:
Harmonium (1923) -- Poems added to Harmonium (1931) -- Ideas of order (1936) -- The man with the blue guitar (1937) -- Parts of a world (1942) -- Transport to summer (1947) -- The auroras of autumn (1950) -- The rock (1954) -- Late poems (1950-1955) -- Uncollected poems -- Plays. Three travelers watch a sunrise ; Carlos among the candles ; Bowl, cat and broomstick -- The necessary angel : essays on reality and imagination -- Uncollected prose -- From the notebooks -- Journals and letters.
ISBN:
9781883011451
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

"Undoubtedly, the single finest collection of Wallace Stevens ever produced." -- Library Journal

Wallace Stevens's unique voice combined meditative speculation and what he called "the essential gaudiness of poetry" in a body of work of astonishing profusion and exuberance, poems that have remained an inspiration and influence for generations of poets and readers. Now, for the first time, the works of America's supreme poet of the imagination are collected in one authoritative Library of America volume.

Here are all of Stevens's published books of poetry, side-by-side for the first time with the haunting lyrics of his later years and early work that traces the development of his art. From the rococo inventiveness of Harmonium , his first volume (including such classics as "Sunday Morning" and "Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird"), through "Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction," "Esthétique du Mal," "The Auroras of Autumn," and the other large-scale masterpieces of his middle years, to the austere final poems of "The Rock," Stevens's poetry explores with unrelenting intensity the relation between the world and the human imagination, between nature as found and nature as invented, and the ways poetry mediates between them. The volume presents over ninety poems uncollected by Stevens, including early versions of often-discussed works like "The Comedian as the Letter C" and "Owl's Clover."

Also here is the most comprehensive selection of Stevens's prose writings. The Necessary Angel (1951), his distinguished book of essays, joins nearly fifty shorter pieces, many previously uncollected: reviews, speeches, short stories, criticism, philosophical writings, and responses to the work of T. S. Eliot, Marianne Moore, William Carlos Williams, and other poets. The often-dazzling aphorisms Stevens gathered over the years are included, as are his plays and selections from his poetic notebooks. Rounding out the volume is a fifty-year span of journal entries and letters, newly edited from manuscript sources, which provide fascinating glimpses of Stevens's thoughts on poetry and the creative process.

The volume also contains explanatory notes, a detailed chronology of Stevens' life, and an essay on textual selection.


Author Notes

Sir John Frank Kermode, November 29, 1919 - August 17, 2010 John Kermode was a British literary critic best known for his work The Sense of an Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction, published in 1967 (revised 2000), and for his extensive book-reviewing and editing. He was the Lord Northcliffe Professor of Modern English Literature at University College London and the King Edward VII Professor of English Literature at Cambridge University.

Kermode served during World War II with the Royal Navy. After the war, Kermode held positions at Manchester University, Bristol University, University College of London, and Cambridge University, all in England, and at Columbia University in New York City. He was Charles E. Norton Professor at Harvard University in 1977-78 and Henry Luce Professor at Yale University in 1994.

Kermode wrote several books on literary figures, including D.H. Lawrence and Wallace Stevens. His works of criticism include An Appetite for Poetry and The Art of Telling. Kermode was also the editor of the cultural journal, Encounter and his memoir, Not Entitled, was published in 1995. Kermode serves on the editorial board of the London Review of Books and Common Knowledge and has acted as judge for the Booker Prize. He was knighted for his service to English literature and he was named a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1999.

He died in Cambridge on August 17, 2010. (Bowker Author Biography) Frank Kermode has written & edited many works, among them "Forms of Attention" & a memoir, "Not Entitled" (FSG, 1995). He lives in Cambridge, England, & has frequently taught in the United States.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

This outstanding volume collects for the first time all of Stevens's published poetry, along with his writings about poetry plus reviews, criticism, speeches, short stories, and philosophical works. It also contains scholarly notes on the text plus an index to first lines and titles. Undoubtedly, the single finest collection of Stevens ever produced. Essential for all collections. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.