Cover image for Salvage style for outdoor living
Title:
Salvage style for outdoor living
Author:
Hankinson, Moira.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
London : Rodale Inc. ; [New York] : Distributed in the book trade by St. Martin's Press, 2001.
Physical Description:
143 pages : color illustrations ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780875968681
Format :
Book

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SB473.5 .H26 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Step-by-step projects transform unwanted materials into stylish garden ornaments. Used pallets. Junked scaffolds. These are materials the average gardener might have, or might have a way of getting. What can the ecologically minded person do? Pioneers of reclamation Moira and Nicholas Hankinson guide readers through 30-plus projects that will add signature style to any yard or garden. Readers will learn how to uncover artifacts, then turn them into something useful and beautiful. Salvage Style for Outdoor Living serves the reader who craves simplicity but will not forgo sophistication.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Chapter One SEATING AND RETREATING When the sun shines, the birds sing, and the blossoms are sweetly fragrant, it is time to retreat to the garden and invite family and friends to join in long, lazy lunches that last the whole afternoon or romantic, moonlit supper parties that last well into the night.     To set the stage, create a romantic arbor using sturdy poles as supports in a shaded area--somewhere not too far from the house--and build a barbecue of old reclaimed bricks.     As the focal point of the dining area, construct a table from enormous stones or boulders topped with a slab of slate or flagstone, rejuvenate a sturdy old wooden table by giving it a metal top, adapt a cast iron sewing machine base to create one of those tables so popular in cafés and pubs, or even convert a huge wooden cable spool into a table.     Alternatively, create an eye-catching garden detail by making a mosaic-covered table out of seashells collected while combing the beach, or broken tiles and china unearthed while digging in the garden. We used caps from old wooden cheese presses placed on top of slender branches to create tables that have a rustic charm. In contrast, a concrete slab, once the side of a coal bin but now a tabletop on a base of built-up concrete blocks, has more the look of semi-industrial chic! Different areas of a garden, like rooms within a home, should generate different feelings. Strategically placed seating provides places to retreat to according to one's mood and adds character to a garden. Make unusual garden seats from sections of cast-iron grills salvaged from an old greenhouse. Use old scaffold boards or pallets or even wood salvaged from windblown trees to make benches, swing seats, or oversized bench tables. Make seats from the stump of an old tree. Cut up old wooden ladders no longer considered safe to make authentic ladderback chairs. Saw old oak whiskey barrels in half for tub seats, or take a timeworn dining chair and plant the seat with your favorite herb. Furnish a sunny arbor with a pine chapel bench. One of our friends even made a seat out of an old cast-iron bathtub cut in half! Why not make yourself comfortable in the garden shed--make a wooden bench on which to perch when you're busy at the potting stand.     Visit historic houses and gardens to see for yourself fine architectural gems and to get ideas. You might be inspired to design and build a garden temple from period salvage, using old floorboards, doors, windows, and shutters to create a glorious hideaway. If building is beyond your budget, let loose your imagination and transform an old tool shed, outhouse, or henhouse, giving yourself somewhere to sit quietly and contemplate. Take your inspiration from nature and make a den, shelter, or a simple retreat.     Inspired by the Romans, grottos were a feature of many landscaped European gardens of the eighteenth century, and you might want to create a grotto of your own. Whatever the size of your garden, a magical space decorated with beautiful shells, planted with shade-loving, large-leaved plants, and enhanced by the soothing sound of trickling water can only add to the atmosphere. SCAFFOLD TABLE EQUIPMENT Paintbrush Tape measure Tri-square Pencil or marker Hand saw Hammer Wood chisel Screwdriver Drill and wood drill bits Wrench Miter saw (optional) Orbital sander (or coarse sandpaper) MATERIALS Exterior-grade transparent wood preservative Seven lengths of 76-inch scaffold board (tabletop and seats) Four 25 1/4-inch lengths of 3 x 3-inch lumber (legs) Two 9-inch lengths of 2 x 2-inch lumber (seat supports) 3-inch wood screws Two 60-inch lengths of 3 x 3-inch lumber (tabletop supports) Four 4-inch lag bolts Two pieces of 8 x 8 x 2-inch lumber (braces) White acrylic paint (or selected color of multipurpose paint or stain) METHOD Treat all the wood for the table with the exterior-grade transparent wood preservative. Any cut surfaces should be similarly treated as the construction proceeds. 1 Mark a point 18 inches from the bottom of one of the legs to represent the eventual height of the seat off the ground. Mark a second point the thickness of the scaffold board down from the first point, and a third point 2 inches farther down from the second point. Use the tri-square and pencil or marker to draw horizontal lines across one face at the second and third points. Extend each line by 1 inch across the two adjacent faces of the leg. Join the ends of the two 1 -inch lines to mark the area of the leg to be cut out to create a mortise for the seat support. Use the hand saw to cut along the marked sides of the mortise, then remove the wood with a hammer and wood chisel. Repeat this process for the other three legs. 2 Mark the center of one of the seat supports and insert the support into the mortise of a leg. Make sure that the support is centered and that the joint fits tightly. Check that the joint is square and attach the support with two 3-inch wood screws. Repeat with the remaining three legs and seat supports. 3 Before proceeding, lay out the four legs and two frame cross-members on a level surface to familiarize yourself with the construction sequence. Take one of the tabletop supports and use the tri-square to draw a line 3 inches from one end. Mark a point centered between the line and the end of the top support and predrill a hole for a lag bolt. Repeat for the other end of the tabletop support. Place one end of the tabletop support over the top of a leg, insert a lag bolt into the predrilled hole, and secure it to the leg using the wrench. Secure the other end of the tabletop support to a second leg to complete assembly of the first frame. Make up the second frame with the remaining tabletop support and two legs. 4 Use the hand saw (or miter saw) to cut the two 8 x 8 x 2-inch pieces of lumber in half diagonally to create four triangular corner braces. Be sure the assembled frames are square and attach the corner braces with 3-inch wood screws. If you cannot find 8 x 8 x 2-inch lumber, you can use a brace made from 2 x 2 or 3 x 3 wood with the ends cut at 45 degree angles. 5 Mark the center point of one end of one of the scaffold boards and two points 1 1/2 inches on either side of the center point. Using the tri-square, draw lines through the second and third points, continuing them around the end onto the bottom of the board to a depth of 3 inches on each surface. Join the ends of the 3-inch lines to create the outline of a 3-inch-square mortise that will fit tightly over the leg. Cut out the marked mortise with the saw, hammer, and chisel. Repeat for the other end of the board and both ends of a second board to create the two bench seats. Place the seats over the seat supports attached to the legs with the mortise fitted over the leg and attach them with 3-inch wood screws. 6 The frame should now be self-supporting. Place it on a level surface and mark the centers of the two tabletop supports and the center of both ends of a scaffold board. Use the marked points to place the scaffold board centrally on the supports and attach it with one 3-inch wood screw at each end. Double-check the angles with the tri-square and secure the scaffold board with two screws at each end. Fit the remaining four boards into place butted on either side of the central board, and the structure of your table is complete. Tighten all the screws to make sure the table is rigid. 7 Paint the entire table with a coat of white acrylic paint diluted to half strength with water; let it dry. (Multipurpose garden paint or stain can be used instead of the acrylic paint, depending on the color finish you want. The Italian table we admired was stained black.) 8 When the paint is completely dry, sand the table with the orbital sander or sandpaper to remove the surface of the paint and reveal some of the underlying wood. Smooth off any rough spots or splinters, paying particular attention to sharp edges and areas where natural wear would occur. The table is now ready to use. CHEESE PRESS TABLE EQUIPMENT Wire brush Rubber gloves Stiff-bristled paintbrush Small disposable paintbrush Tape measure Wood saw Garden spade Hand trowel Metal or wooden tamper Hammer MATERIALS Wooden cheese-press followers (caps) Exterior-grade transparent wood preservative Wood hardener Logs 6-inch galvanized roundhead nails METHOD 1 Take the wooden cheese-press followers, or caps, and remove any soft or extraneous rotten wood using the wire brush. Place the followers on a flat surface and saturate them with transparent wood preservative using the stiff-bristled paintbrush. Make sure the entire surface of the wood is treated, and allow the preservative to soak into the wood. Let the followers dry. Apply a generous coating of wood hardener to the followers with the disposable paintbrush, ensuring that any particularly soft areas are saturated. Again, let the followers dry. 2 Select the logs you will be using for the table stands, which should be at least 8 inches longer than the desired table or seat height. Saw one end of each log straight across. Decide on a location for the tables. For each table or seat, dig a hole at least 8 inches deep where the stand will be inserted, and remove any remaining soil with the hand trowel. Place the post into the hole with the cut end upward and horizontal and replace the soil, firming it with the metal or wooden tamper until the post is held firmly in position. 3 Place each cheese-press follower on the cut end of a post, making sure it is supported in the center, and secure it in place with at least three 6-inch galvanized nails. We selected newly cut willow logs for the table supports, so there is a chance that the willow will root and sprout new growth in years to come. CHAIR PLANTER EQUIPMENT Pliers Screwdriver Marker or awl Metal or tin snips Metal rule or straightedge Heavy-duty craft knife Electric drill and small metal drill bit MATERIALS Chair with seat rebate Zinc or metal sheet 1-inch wood screws METHOD The chair we selected for this project was neither painted nor treated, and since we designed it for only occasional outside use, we decided to leave it that way. If you want to leave your planter outside, treat the chair with a wood preservative or exterior-grade paint before use. There are a number of attractively colored paints and preservatives now on the market that are ideal for this purpose. 1 Remove the seat from the chair frame and take off any wooden supports using the pliers or screwdriver. Place the chair upside down on top of the zinc or metal sheet on the edge of a work surface, and draw around the inside of the seat with the marker. 2 Measure the depth of the seat mortise and add an extra 2 inches. Draw a second line, the distance of this combined measurement, around the marked shape on the zinc sheet. Trace over this marked line with the awl, creating a slight impression in the metal along the line. Then, turn the sheet over and transfer the line to that side with the marker. Cut the zinc sheet along the second line with the metal snips. Cut a rectangle from each corner from the marked seat size to the outside edge of the zinc sheet using the metal snips, which will allow the zinc sheet to be bent into a tray shape. Draw a line 1 inch from each outside edge. Use the heavy-duty craft knife and metal rule or straightedge to lightly score along the marked line outlining the shape of the seat. Turn the sheet over and score along the second line marked 1 inch from the outside edge. (If your zinc sheet is not large enough to create an entire tray shape inside the seat mortise, like ours in the photos on page 23, create the tray as best you can using the material you have.) 3 Place the zinc sheet on the work surface, with the scored line of the seat shape on top. Gently bend each side of the sheet over the work surface edge to form a tray shape to fit inside the seat mortise. Turn the sheet over and use the work surface edge to gently bend the sheet along the lines scored 1 inch from the outside edge to a right angle, creating a lip around the tray to hold it securely within the seat mortise. 4 Place the completed tray on a piece of scrap wood and use the electric drill and metal drill bit to drill a series of drainage holes in the tray. Then drill two holes in each lip to allow the tray to be securely screwed into position on the seat frame. 5 Place the tray into the seat mortise and secure it in place with two 1-inch wood screws driven through each lip into the seat frame. Fill the tray with soil or planting medium and plant your flowers or herbs. Press down on the soil around the plants and thoroughly water them before placing the planter in position in your garden. You may prefer not to plant directly inside the zinc tray, but to construct a versatile planter that can be used to hold temporary displays of plants in pots. If this is your plan, you will have to build the zinc tray deep enough to hold the pots. POTTING STAND EQUIPMENT Paintbrush Tape measure Tri-square Pencil or marker Hand saw Electric drill and wood drill bit Screwdriver Level MATERIALS Transparent wood preservative 1 1/4-inch wood screws 2-inch wood screws WOOD For the base: 3-inch-square softwood lumber cut into: Two front legs approx. 28 inches Two rear legs approx. 44 inches 3/4 x 4-inch softwood lumber cut into: Two side stretchers approx, 23 1/2 inches One rear stretcher approx. 36 1/2 inches 3/4 9-inch softwood lumber cut into: Two bin sides approx. 23 1/2 inches One bin front approx. 38 inches Quantity of approx, 1-inch-square softwood lumber (support battens) 1/2 x 6-inch softwood lumber cut into: Two pot boards approx. 36 1/2 inches 1/2 x 23 3/4 x 36 1/2-inch piece of waterproof plywood or particleboard (bin base) For the top: 3/4 x 8-inch softwood lumber cut into: Two side pieces approx, 35 inches One bottom shelf approx. 36 1/2 inches One vertical divider approx, 23 5/8 inches One long shelf approx. 24 inches One short shelf approx. 11 3/4 inches 3/4 x 9-inch softwood lumber approx. 38 1/2 inches long (top) 3/4 x 6-inch softwood lumber cut into: Seven back boards approx, 44 inches METHOD Before assembling the potting stand, paint all the wood you will be using for this project with the transparent wood preservative. Pay particular attention to the cut ends and end grain. 1 Lay one front and one rear leg on a flat surface, the front on the left and the rear on the right. On the top faces of each leg, measure two points 8 inches and 24 3/4 inches from the bottom of the leg. Use the tri-square and pencil or marker to draw horizontal lines at each of these points. Place a side stretcher across the bottom line of both legs and a bin side on the top line and secure them with 2-inch wood screws. Repeat with the other two legs, but this time place the front leg on the right and the rear leg on the left to create the two opposite side frames. 2 Turn the side frames over and fit one support batten to the inside of each bin side, one end flush with and butted against the top of the front leg and the other approximately 1 inch short of the rear leg. Place the two sides upright with their rear legs flat on the surface and the side stretchers and bin sides on the outside. Fit the rear stretcher across the rear legs inside the bin sides, its top level with the top of the battens. Screw it securely in place with 2-inch wood screws. 3 Place the bin front over the front legs, its ends flush with the outside faces of the bin sides, and secure it with 2-inch wood screws. Turn the base over onto its front and fit one support batten to the rear of the bin front between and flush with the tops of the front legs. You have now made the basic structure of the potting stand base. 4 Stand the base upright on its legs and, checking that the frame is square, fit the two pot boards over the side stretchers, butting them against the back legs. Attach the boards with 2-inch wood screws. 5 Carefully measure the inside dimensions of the open-backed bin you've made and cut the waterproof plywood or particleboard to that size, removing a notch from each back corner to fit over the rear legs. Drop the board into place so that it rests on the battens, the front legs, and the top of the rear stretcher, and secure it with 1 1/4-inch wood screws. The potting stand base is now complete. 6 You are now ready to start building the potting stand top. First check the measurement between the outsides of the rear legs of the base. Depending on the thickness of the lumber you have used for the base construction, this should be approximately 36 1/2 inches. This measurement is important because the top is designed to fit snugly over the rear legs (which are raised above the top of the base) and rest on the bin sides. Measure a point 10 1/4 inches from the bottom of each side piece and, using the pencil and tri-square, draw a line across each side piece. Fit the bottom shelf between the two side pieces level with that marked point and secure it to the sides with 2-inch wood screws. Take the top piece and place it on top of the side pieces with an overhang at the sides and front and secure it with 2-inch wood screws. You have now constructed the basic frame of the top. Mark a point 11 3/4 inches from one end on both the top piece and the bottom shelf. Fit the vertical divider at that point with 2-inch wood screws to divide the frame into two unequal sections. Mark points just above the halfway point on the inside of the vertical divider and side piece within the wider section and fit the long shelf in position, securing it with 2-inch wood screws. Finally, mark points approximately 1 1/2 inches above the long shelf on the inside of the remaining smaller section and secure the short shelf at that position with 2-inch wood screws. 7 Place the assembled top structure face down on your work surface, check that it is square, and, starting at one side with the edge of the first back board flush with the outside face of the side piece, proceed to attach the remaining back boards to the rear, securing them with 2-inch wood screws. You may have to cut the final board to fit. Carefully lift the completed top section onto the base so that it fits over the extended back legs and the side pieces rest on the bin sides. Secure it with 2-inch wood screws driven through the back boards into the legs and the rear edge of the bin sides. Place the potting stand into position, fill the bin with potting soil or compost, and it is ready to use. CONCRETE TABLE EQUIPMENT Pointing trowel Shovel Cement-mixing board or wheelbarrow Level Tape measure Mallet Soft brush Paintbrush (optional) Large sheet of plastic MATERIALS Soft or builder's sand Water Cement Approximately ten 6-inch concrete blocks Concrete slab top Multipurpose garden or masonry paint (optional) METHOD If you're building the garden table on a solid surface, clean the surface of any lichen or other growth. At a new site, build the table on a concrete foundation (1 part cement to 2 parts soft or builder's sand and 4 parts aggregate) at least 12 inches deep. The foundation should be allowed to harden before the base is installed. Calculate how many blocks will be required to construct a base of the right height for the table. Standard tabletops are approximately 30 inches high. Remember to allow for the thickness of the tabletop and each layer of mortar. 1 Place two concrete blocks approximately 3/4 inch apart on the ground where the table base will be built. Draw around them with the point of your trowel and put the blocks to one side. Make up a workable mortar mix of 5 parts sand to 1 part cement and water and place a thick layer of the mix inside the trowel marks. Replace the two blocks in position on the mortar and tap them into place with the handle of the trowel, periodically checking with the level. Clean off excess mortar from around the base and use it to fill the joint between the two blocks. Do not fill the gap completely, as this may cause the blocks to splay. 2 Place the next two blocks perpendicular to the first course. Apply mortar across one end of both blocks on the first course sufficient for one of the blocks on the second course. Tap the block into place, checking that it is level and that the sides are vertical. Place mortar on the remainder of the first course and lay the fourth block alongside the one you have just laid. Fill the outside of the vertical joint and smooth it. 3 Continue building up the base to the desired height, checking with the level as you go. To fit the top, place mortar around the edge of the top course and a trowelful in the center. Fit the top carefully on the mortar, and when it is centered, make sure it is level. Tap it firmly in place with the handle of the mallet. Remove excess mortar from around the top of the base. After about 4 hours, brush over the joints with a soft brush to remove any loose material. Keep new blockwork moist in hot weather and protect it from sun, wind, rain, or frost with the large sheet of plastic. Allow 1 week for the mortar to cure before using the table. If desired, the base can be painted with two coats of multipurpose garden paint or masonry paint applied with a stiff paintbrush. Excerpted from SALVAGE STYLE FOR OUTDOOR LIVING by Moira and Nicholas Hankinson. Copyright © 2001 by Moira and Nicholas Hankinson. Excerpted by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.