Cover image for Wilderness comes home : rewilding the Northeast
Title:
Wilderness comes home : rewilding the Northeast
Author:
Klyza, Christopher McGrory.
Publication Information:
Hanover : University Press of New England, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xv, 320 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
An eastern turn for wilderness / Christopher McGrory Klyza -- "Remote, rocky, barren, bushy wild-woody wilderness": the natural history of the northeast / Alicia Daniel and Thor Hanson -- Old-growth forests of the northeast / Robert T. Leverett -- Public lands and wild lands in the northeast / Christopher McGrory Klyza -- Ecological reserve design in the northeast / Stephen C. Trombulak -- An opportunity for big wilderness in the northern Appalachians / Jamie Sayen -- Restoring the wild: species recovery and reintroduction / Stephen C. Trombulak and Kimberly Royar -- Making it happen: protecting wilderness on the ground / Emily Bateson and Nancy Smith -- Stewardship and sustainability: lessons from the "middle landscape" of Vermont / Nora Mitchell and Rolf Diamant -- Vermont family forests: building a sustainable relationship with local forests / David Brynn -- A conversation at the edge of wilderness / John Elder -- Some lessons from wilderness, east and west / John Davis.
ISBN:
9781584651017

9781584651024
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library QH76.5.N96 W56 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Fifteen experts examine the state of wilderness in the Northeast and outline a program for a rewilded North Woods.


Summary

McGrory (environmental studies, Middlebury College) collects a dozen essays that take stock of the Northeastern US's natural history; discuss species recovery/reintroduction; and examine NE wild lands in the context of lessons learned from sites in Vermont and out West. Includes maps, and b&w photos


Author Notes

Emily Bateson has been the Associate Director of Sweet Water Trust's Wildlands Program in Boston since 1997.
David Brynn works as the Addison County Forester in Vermont. He is the founder and director of Vermont Family Forests.
Alicia Daniel Associate Director of the Field Naturalist Program at the University of Vermont.
John Davis is Biodiversity Program Officer at the Foundation for Deep Ecology in San Francisco.
Rolf Diamant is Superintendent of the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Woodstock, Vermont.
John Elder teaches English and environmental studies at Middlebury College.
Thor Hanson is a naturalist and writer from the Pacific Northwest.
Christopher McGrory Klyza is associate professor of political science and environmental studies at Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont.
Robert T. Leverett is the Executive Director of Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest, Massachusetts, a co-founder of the Eastern Native Tree Society, and the chairman of the special advisory board of the 500 Year Forest Foundation of Lynchburg, Virginia.
Bill McKibben is the author of The End of Nature, which has appeared in twenty languages
Nora Mitchell is the Director of the National Park Service's Conservation Study Institute, a national program based at the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Vermont.
Kimberly Royar has worked as a District Wildlife Biologist for the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department since 1981.
Jamie Sayen has been a wilderness activist in northern New England for over a decade. He is founder and now publisher of The Northern Forest Forum. He founded and served as Executive Director of the Northern Appalachian Restoration Project from 1992 to 1997.
Nancy Smith is the Executive Director and Wildlands Program Director of Sweet Water Trust in Boston, a foundation dedicated to the conservation of wild nature.
Stephen C. Trombulak is the Albert D. Mead Professor of Biology and Environmental Studies at Middlebury College.


Emily Bateson has been the Associate Director of Sweet Water Trust's Wildlands Program in Boston since 1997.
David Brynn works as the Addison County Forester in Vermont. He is the founder and director of Vermont Family Forests.
Alicia Daniel Associate Director of the Field Naturalist Program at the University of Vermont.
John Davis is Biodiversity Program Officer at the Foundation for Deep Ecology in San Francisco.
Rolf Diamant is Superintendent of the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Woodstock, Vermont.
John Elder teaches English and environmental studies at Middlebury College.
Thor Hanson is a naturalist and writer from the Pacific Northwest.
Christopher McGrory Klyza is associate professor of political science and environmental studies at Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont.
Robert T. Leverett is the Executive Director of Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest, Massachusetts, a co-founder of the Eastern Native Tree Society, and the chairman of the special advisory board of the 500 Year Forest Foundation of Lynchburg, Virginia.
Bill McKibben is the author of The End of Nature, which has appeared in twenty languages
Nora Mitchell is the Director of the National Park Service's Conservation Study Institute, a national program based at the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Vermont.
Kimberly Royar has worked as a District Wildlife Biologist for the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department since 1981.
Jamie Sayen has been a wilderness activist in northern New England for over a decade. He is founder and now publisher of The Northern Forest Forum. He founded and served as Executive Director of the Northern Appalachian Restoration Project from 1992 to 1997.
Nancy Smith is the Executive Director and Wildlands Program Director of Sweet Water Trust in Boston, a foundation dedicated to the conservation of wild nature.
Stephen C. Trombulak is the Albert D. Mead Professor of Biology and Environmental Studies at Middlebury College.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Some major environmental thinkers (William Cronon, J. Baird Callicott) have attacked the wilderness concept. The editor and contributors to this volume are aware of this critique but show that the concept retains value, especially for biodiversity preservation, the purpose Callicott advocates for reserves. Whatever the merit of that perspective, the book presents an ambitious plan for interconnected wilderness reserves, both major and minor, in the Northeastern US. The whole picture is here. First, the story: the ecological history of the lands, of their exploitation by loggers and farmers over most of the approximately 400 years of Euro-American domination, of species extinctions and invasions, of the slow return of much of the region to forests no longer controlled by humans. Second, the plan: though some will think quixotic the idea of creating in the Northeast extensive wilderness areas, complete with ecological buffer zones and interconnecting wildlife corridors, these essays demonstrate a feasible strategy for accomplishing exactly that; and some of them describe current efforts consistent with that goal. These discussions are important for those interested in wilderness, environmental history and restoration, environmental ethics, cultural geography, biodiversity issues, and related fields. All levels. W. Ouderkirk SUNY Empire State College


Choice Review

Some major environmental thinkers (William Cronon, J. Baird Callicott) have attacked the wilderness concept. The editor and contributors to this volume are aware of this critique but show that the concept retains value, especially for biodiversity preservation, the purpose Callicott advocates for reserves. Whatever the merit of that perspective, the book presents an ambitious plan for interconnected wilderness reserves, both major and minor, in the Northeastern US. The whole picture is here. First, the story: the ecological history of the lands, of their exploitation by loggers and farmers over most of the approximately 400 years of Euro-American domination, of species extinctions and invasions, of the slow return of much of the region to forests no longer controlled by humans. Second, the plan: though some will think quixotic the idea of creating in the Northeast extensive wilderness areas, complete with ecological buffer zones and interconnecting wildlife corridors, these essays demonstrate a feasible strategy for accomplishing exactly that; and some of them describe current efforts consistent with that goal. These discussions are important for those interested in wilderness, environmental history and restoration, environmental ethics, cultural geography, biodiversity issues, and related fields. All levels. W. Ouderkirk SUNY Empire State College


Table of Contents

Christopher McGrory KlyzaAlicia Daniel and Thor HansonRobert T. LeverettChristopher McGrory KlyzaStephen C. TrombulakJamie SayenStephen C. Trombulak and Kimberly RoyarEmily Bateson and Nancy SmithNora Mitchell and Rolf DiamantDavid BrynnJohn ElderJohn DavisBill McKibbenChristopher McGrory KlyzaAlicia Daniel and Thor HansonRobert T. LeverettChristopher McGrory KlyzaStephen C. TrombulakJamie SayenStephen C. Trombulak and Kimberly RoyarEmily Bateson and Nancy SmithNora Mitchell and Rolf DiamantDavid BrynnJohn ElderJohn DavisBill McKibben
List of Illustrations and Tablesp. ix
Prefacep. xiii
Part I Taking Stock
Chapter 1 An Eastern Turn for Wildernessp. 3
Chapter 2 "Remote, Rocky, Barren, Bushy Wild-woody Wilderness": The Natural History of the Northeastp. 27
Chapter 3 Old-Growth Forests of the Northeastp. 47
Chapter 4 Public Lands and Wild Lands in the Northeastp. 75
Part II Designing a Northeastern System of Wild Lands
Chapter 5 Ecological Reserve Design in the Northeastp. 107
Chapter 6 An Opportunity for Big Wilderness in the Northern Appalachiansp. 124
Chapter 7 Restoring the Wild: Species Recovery and Reintroductionp. 157
Chapter 8 Making It Happen: Protecting Wilderness on the Groundp. 182
Part III Northeastern Wild Lands in Context
Chapter 9 Stewardship and Sustainability: Lessons from the "Middle Landscape" of Vermontp. 213
Chapter 10 Vermont Family Forests: Building a Sustainable Relationship with Local Forestsp. 234
Chapter 11 A Conversation at the Edge of Wildernessp. 256
Chapter 12 Some Lessons from Wilderness, East and Westp. 263
Part IV Final Thoughts
Epiloguep. 275
Sources for Graphs, Maps, and Tablesp. 279
Notesp. 283
List of Contributorsp. 313
Indexp. 317
List of Illustrations and Tablesp. ix
Prefacep. xiii
Part I Taking Stock
Chapter 1 An Eastern Turn for Wildernessp. 3
Chapter 2 "Remote, Rocky, Barren, Bushy Wild-woody Wilderness": The Natural History of the Northeastp. 27
Chapter 3 Old-Growth Forests of the Northeastp. 47
Chapter 4 Public Lands and Wild Lands in the Northeastp. 75
Part II Designing a Northeastern System of Wild Lands
Chapter 5 Ecological Reserve Design in the Northeastp. 107
Chapter 6 An Opportunity for Big Wilderness in the Northern Appalachiansp. 124
Chapter 7 Restoring the Wild: Species Recovery and Reintroductionp. 157
Chapter 8 Making It Happen: Protecting Wilderness on the Groundp. 182
Part III Northeastern Wild Lands in Context
Chapter 9 Stewardship and Sustainability: Lessons from the "Middle Landscape" of Vermontp. 213
Chapter 10 Vermont Family Forests: Building a Sustainable Relationship with Local Forestsp. 234
Chapter 11 A Conversation at the Edge of Wildernessp. 256
Chapter 12 Some Lessons from Wilderness, East and Westp. 263
Part IV Final Thoughts
Epiloguep. 275
Sources for Graphs, Maps, and Tablesp. 279
Notesp. 283
List of Contributorsp. 313
Indexp. 317

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