Cover image for The race to the top : the real story of globalization
Title:
The race to the top : the real story of globalization
Author:
Larsson, Tomas, 1966-
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Världens klassresa. English
Publication Information:
Washington, D.C. : CATO Institute, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
vi, 164 pages ; 25 cm
General Note:
"A revision and expansion of the book originally published by Timbro in Swedish as Världens Klassresa (1999)"--Introd.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781930865143

9781930865150
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Larsson takes the reader on a fast-paced, worldwide journey that extends from the slums of Rio to the brothels of Bangkok and shows what access to global markets means for those struggling to get ahead in the world.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

Until recently, both the American mindset and the American economy have been particularly insular. Larsson, a doctoral student and freelance writer, brings home the new world perspective in this highly personal book about the effects of globalization on large and small companies in various communities throughout the world. A Swede by birth, Larsson writes from the unusual perspective (for American readers) of firsthand experiences in Brazil, Hong Kong, and Thailand (he has a Thai wife). In this respect, his book has considerable value and makes a good companion to Thomas L. Friedman's recent overview of globalization, The Lexus and the Olive Tree (LJ 4/15/99). Larsson, who focuses on the more positive results of a global economy, provides a number of noteworthy comments on concepts such as "dumping" as it relates to prosperity, though he illustrates his points heavily with anecdotes rather than charts and figures. Libraries that specialize in economics may find this book of value. Steven Silkunas, Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, Philadelphia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Contrasting with Alan Tonelson's The Race to the Bottom: Why Worldwide Worker Surplus and Uncontrolled Free Trade Are Sinking American Living Standards (CH, May'01), Swedish journalist Larsson's work provides an opposing view documented by real-world experiences and on-the-spot reporting in various countries, which attest to the benefits that free international trade brings to developed and developing nations and peoples. Chapter titles such as "Thailand--A Global Brothel," "Brazilianization," and "The Isolation Trap" illustrate the spirited, lucid style through which Larsson presents weighty evidence showing the enormous availability of economic opportunities leading to a better life for all groups worldwide due to free trade among nations. All of this is contrary to Tonelson's gloomy views regarding free trade. A useful, balanced exposition of these matters appears in Murray Weidenbaum's Looking for Common Ground on U.S. Trade Policy (2001). Some readers may miss tables and charts, but Larsson's chapter notes provide sources for data presented. Highly recommended for general readers as well as professionals interested in free trade issues. H. I. Liebling emeritus, Lafayette College


Table of Contents

Introductionp. 1
1. Thailand--A Global Brothelp. 5
2. Brazilianizationp. 9
3. The Real 20/80 Societyp. 15
4. Legacies of the Ipanema Leftp. 19
5. The Isolation Trapp. 23
6. Unfair Tradep. 29
7. The WTO Trapp. 33
8. Good Times, Bad Policyp. 39
9. Trading Upp. 47
10. Errors of the Free Tradersp. 53
11. The Cult of Secrecyp. 61
12. The Mental Wallp. 67
13. Third Waysp. 71
14. The Future Is Openp. 77
15. French Fries vs. the Goddess of the Seap. 83
16. The Freedom Gapp. 91
17. Watch the Grass Growp. 99
18. Changing Crony Capitalismp. 105
19. A Course in Corruptionp. 113
20. Making It Happenp. 117
21. "We Are All Globalizers Now"p. 125
22. Trial by Firep. 133
Notesp. 139
Referencesp. 149
Indexp. 157