Cover image for B. Franklin, printer
Title:
B. Franklin, printer
Author:
Adler, David A.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Holiday House, 2001.
Physical Description:
vii, 126 pages ; illustrations : 27 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
970 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 7.1 4.0 54931.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 6.3 8 Quiz: 31961 Guided reading level: V.
ISBN:
9780823416752
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library E302.6.F8 A26 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Programming Workroom-2nd Floor
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Grand Island Library E302.6.F8 A26 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Kenilworth Library E302.6.F8 A26 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Frank E. Merriweather Library E302.6.F8 A26 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Summary

Summary

At the age of twenty-two, Benjamin Franklin wrote his own epitaph. Scientist, inventor, and statesman, and the only man who would sign the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the treaty with France that helped win the Revolutionary War, and the treaty with England that ended it, wanted to be remembered simply as "B. Franklin, printer."


Author Notes

David A. Adler was born in New York City. He attended Queen's College in New York City and later, earned an MBA in Marketing from New York University.

He writes both fiction and non-fiction. He is the author of Cam Jansen mysteries and the Andy Russell titles. His titles has earned him numerous awards including a Sydney Taylor Book Award for his title "The Number on My Grandfather's Arm," "A Picture Book of Jewish Holidays" was named a Notable Book of 1981 by the American Library Association and "Our Golda" was named a Carter G. Woodson Award Honor Book.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-8. The title of this lively biography refers to the epitaph Franklin wrote for himself as a young man. In no way does it limit the scope of Adler's subject, which surveys Benjamin Franklin's life as a printer, a scientist, an inventor, a writer, and a statesman. Adler discusses Franklin in the context of his times, offering insights into his personal life as well as his varied interests and his considerable contributions to his city and, later, his country. Throughout the book, details, anecdotes, and quotations bring the man's portrait into clearer focus, while period illustrations, facsimiles of documents, and excerpts from Franklin's The Pennsylvania Gazette help readers envision the background of his times. The excellent book design includes the use of a typeface favored by Franklin, which gives a period flavor while remaining quite readable. Back matter includes chronologies of Franklin's life and contemporary American history, unusually detailed and informative source notes, illustration credits, and annotated lists of recommended books and Web sites. An intriguing portrait of a many-faceted man. --Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-It is appropriate that a man who loved reading and established the first subscription library in America should be the subject of such a stellar book. From printer (his favorite title) to husband and father to scientist to military general to diplomat, "Le Grand Franklin" is hereby presented in all of his wise glory as well as in his humble pride. His incredible life flies by in a flurry of accomplishment, with readers hardly noticing the years passing, or that they are learning an interesting and important part of history. The many black-and-white repro- ductions, some from the man's own hand, complement the typeface, which was used in productions from Franklin's Philadelphia press. The source notes put most series biographies to shame. With its chronologies, map, index, diverse bibliography, and helpful Web sites, this is a solid research tool. Franklin's maxims and passages from his Pennsylvania Gazette are generously spread throughout the text, and readers will develop an appreciation for who this person was in his own time and what he means to the United States in our day. Adler doesn't miss a beat in his first biography for this age level, which is perhaps the best so far of a man who, he suggests, may have been "our greatest American."-Andrew Medlar, Chicago Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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