Cover image for The essential Harold Cruse : a reader
Title:
The essential Harold Cruse : a reader
Author:
Cruse, Harold.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Palgrave, 2002.
Physical Description:
xxiv, 310 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780312293970

9780312293963
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

In 1967, as the movement for civil rights was turning into a bitter, often violent battle for black power, Harold Cruse's The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual burst onto the scene. It was a lacerating attack on integration, and set the agenda for black cultural, social, and political autonomy. A classic of African American social thought, the book and its author went on to influence generations of activists, artists, and scholars. Cruse's intelligence, independence, and breadth of vision virtually defined what it meant to be a black intellectual in modern America. Here is a powerful introduction to Cruse's wide body of work. This first anthology of Cruse's writing includes published material such as excerpts from Crisis , as well as unpublished essays, speeches, and correspondence. The Essential Harold Cruse is certain to become standard reading for anyone interested in race in American society.


Summary

In 1967, as the movement for civil rights was turning into a bitter, often violent battle for black power, Harold Cruse's The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual burst onto the scene. It was a lacerating attack on integration, and set the agenda for black cultural, social, and political autonomy. A classic of African American social thought, the book and its author went on to influence generations of activists, artists, and scholars. Cruse's intelligence, independence, and breadth of vision virtually defined what it meant to be a black intellectual in modern America. In this first anthology of Cruse's writing, William Jelani Cobb provides a powerfulintroduction to Cruse's wide body of work, including published material such as excerpts from Crisis , as well as unpublished essays, speeches, and correspondence. The Essential Harold Cruse is certain to become standard reading for anyone interested in race in American society.


Author Notes

Stanley Crouch is the author of a novel, Don't the Moon Look Lonesome, as well as three books of essays: Notes of a Hanging Judge, The All-American Skin Game, and Always in Pursuit
William Jelani Cobb is visiting assistant professor of history at Spelman College. He contributes regularly to the Washington Post and to Africana.com


Stanley Crouch is the author of a novel, Don't the Moon Look Lonesome, as well as three books of essays: Notes of a Hanging Judge, The All-American Skin Game, and Always in Pursuit
William Jelani Cobb is visiting assistant professor of history at Spelman College. He contributes regularly to the Washington Post and to Africana.com


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

Harold Cruse is best known for 1967's The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual, an influential call for black autonomy, warning against integration as a strategy. Edited by regular Washington Post contributor William Jelani Cobb, The Essential Harold Cruse: A Reader includes essays from the early 1960s on race, bohemianism, James Baldwin and Cuba; three chapters of Crisis, three from Rebellion or Revolution (1968) and further essays and speeches from the Black Power era; one chapter from Plural but Equal (1987) and a selection of other post-Black Power writings that address theater and music. The introduction by cultural critic Stanley Crouch is useful, but a more complete and analytical intellectual biography is still wanted. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Editor Cobb (visiting assistant professor, history, Spelman Coll.) here offers essential reading for anyone interested in black politics and culture. Cruse is known mostly for his classic text, The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual, and his anti-integrationist and black nationalist views. His writings are respectful of some of America's greatest thinkers and cultural workers, e.g., James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and W.E.B. DuBois, but he doesn't hold back when eloquently disputing their ideas and actions. Cruse brings his critical analysis to bear on issues like black leadership and aesthetics, the interrelationship of politics and culture, civil disobedience, capitalism, the establishment of a black independent political party, and the realities of American culture topics still worthy of debate today. The reader is arranged thematically and chronologically, from Cruse's years in the Communist Party and as a playwright in Greenwich Village (1951-63) to the publication of Plural but Equal. A 1997 interview with Cruse closes the collection. Cruse's legacy is awe-inspiring, and this new work is highly recommended for public and academic libraries. Sherri Barnes, Univ. of California Lib., Santa Barbara (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Harold Cruse is best known for 1967's The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual, an influential call for black autonomy, warning against integration as a strategy. Edited by regular Washington Post contributor William Jelani Cobb, The Essential Harold Cruse: A Reader includes essays from the early 1960s on race, bohemianism, James Baldwin and Cuba; three chapters of Crisis, three from Rebellion or Revolution (1968) and further essays and speeches from the Black Power era; one chapter from Plural but Equal (1987) and a selection of other post-Black Power writings that address theater and music. The introduction by cultural critic Stanley Crouch is useful, but a more complete and analytical intellectual biography is still wanted. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Editor Cobb (visiting assistant professor, history, Spelman Coll.) here offers essential reading for anyone interested in black politics and culture. Cruse is known mostly for his classic text, The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual, and his anti-integrationist and black nationalist views. His writings are respectful of some of America's greatest thinkers and cultural workers, e.g., James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and W.E.B. DuBois, but he doesn't hold back when eloquently disputing their ideas and actions. Cruse brings his critical analysis to bear on issues like black leadership and aesthetics, the interrelationship of politics and culture, civil disobedience, capitalism, the establishment of a black independent political party, and the realities of American culture topics still worthy of debate today. The reader is arranged thematically and chronologically, from Cruse's years in the Communist Party and as a playwright in Greenwich Village (1951-63) to the publication of Plural but Equal. A 1997 interview with Cruse closes the collection. Cruse's legacy is awe-inspiring, and this new work is highly recommended for public and academic libraries. Sherri Barnes, Univ. of California Lib., Santa Barbara (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Stanley CrouchStanley Crouch
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Blues for Brother Crusep. xi
What Is Left? An Introductionp. xv
Part 1 Early Writing
Essays
1. Salute to Josephine Baker, Magnificent Negro Artist (Daily Worker, March 14, 1951; Rebellion or Revolution, 1968)p. 3
2. A Negro Looks at Cuba (Unpublished, 1960)p. 7
3. Race and Bohemianism in Greenwich Village (The Crisis, January 1960)p. 21
4. James Baldwin, the Theater and His Critics (Unpublished, 1963)p. 27
Correspondence
5. Letter to the Amsterdam News (April 19, 1956)p. 36
6. Open Letter to Harry Belafonte (Unpublished, November, 1956)p. 43
Part 2 From The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual (1967)
7. Individualism and the "Open Society"p. 49
8. Cultural Leadership and Cultural Democracyp. 57
9. Negroes and Jews--The Two Nationalisms and the Bloc(ked) Pluralityp. 71
Part 3 Black Power Era
Essays
10. On Explaining 20th Century Negro History (Negro Digest, July 1967)p. 93
11. The Fire This Time?: Eldridge Cleaver: Post-Prison Speeches and Writings (New York Review of Books, May 8, 1969)p. 101
12. The Integrationist Ethic as a Basis for Scholarly Endeavors (Speech given to Yale University Black Student Alliance, 1969)p. 117
13. The Little Rock National Black Political Convention (Black World, October 1974)p. 125
Part 4 from Rebellion or Revolution? (1968)
14. Rebellion or Revolution? Ip. 141
15. Rebellion or Revolution? IIp. 162
16. Marxism and the Negrop. 172
Part 5 Post-Black Power Writings
Essays
17. The Racial Origins of American Theater: A Response to Robert Brustein (Unpublished)p. 187
18. The New Negro History of John Hope Franklin--Promise and Progress (Unpublished)p. 199
19. Amilcar Cabral and the Afro-American Reality (Black World, October 1975)p. 211
20. The Pan-African Constituency and the Black Electorate (Black World, January 1975)p. 219
21. Review of the Paul Robeson Controversy (First World, 1979)p. 226
Correspondence and late essay
22. "Letter to Ralph Story" (Unpublished, September 10, 1986)p. 238
23. Interludes with Duke Ellington (Unpublished, 1982)p. 244
24. Letter to Adolph Reed (Unpublished, June 11, 1986)p. 250
Part 6 From Plural but Equal (1987)
25. Conclusionsp. 257
Part 7 Interview with Harold Cruse
26. An Interview with Harold Cruse (Conducted by Van Gosse, Radical History Review, May 1997)p. 281
Indexp. 299
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Blues for Brother Crusep. xi
What Is Left? An Introductionp. xv
Part 1 Early Writing
Essays
1. Salute to Josephine Baker, Magnificent Negro Artist (Daily Worker, March 14, 1951; Rebellion or Revolution, 1968)p. 3
2. A Negro Looks at Cuba (Unpublished, 1960)p. 7
3. Race and Bohemianism in Greenwich Village (The Crisis, January 1960)p. 21
4. James Baldwin, the Theater and His Critics (Unpublished, 1963)p. 27
Correspondence
5. Letter to the Amsterdam News (April 19, 1956)p. 36
6. Open Letter to Harry Belafonte (Unpublished, November, 1956)p. 43
Part 2 From The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual (1967)
7. Individualism and the "Open Society"p. 49
8. Cultural Leadership and Cultural Democracyp. 57
9. Negroes and Jews--The Two Nationalisms and the Bloc(ked) Pluralityp. 71
Part 3 Black Power Era
Essays
10. On Explaining 20th Century Negro History (Negro Digest, July 1967)p. 93
11. The Fire This Time?: Eldridge Cleaver: Post-Prison Speeches and Writings (New York Review of Books, May 8, 1969)p. 101
12. The Integrationist Ethic as a Basis for Scholarly Endeavors (Speech given to Yale University Black Student Alliance, 1969)p. 117
13. The Little Rock National Black Political Convention (Black World, October 1974)p. 125
Part 4 from Rebellion or Revolution? (1968)
14. Rebellion or Revolution? Ip. 141
15. Rebellion or Revolution? IIp. 162
16. Marxism and the Negrop. 172
Part 5 Post-Black Power Writings
Essays
17. The Racial Origins of American Theater: A Response to Robert Brustein (Unpublished)p. 187
18. The New Negro History of John Hope Franklin--Promise and Progress (Unpublished)p. 199
19. Amilcar Cabral and the Afro-American Reality (Black World, October 1975)p. 211
20. The Pan-African Constituency and the Black Electorate (Black World, January 1975)p. 219
21. Review of the Paul Robeson Controversy (First World, 1979)p. 226
Correspondence and late essay
22. "Letter to Ralph Story" (Unpublished, September 10, 1986)p. 238
23. Interludes with Duke Ellington (Unpublished, 1982)p. 244
24. Letter to Adolph Reed (Unpublished, June 11, 1986)p. 250
Part 6 From Plural but Equal (1987)
25. Conclusionsp. 257
Part 7 Interview with Harold Cruse
26. An Interview with Harold Cruse (Conducted by Van Gosse, Radical History Review, May 1997)p. 281
Indexp. 299