Cover image for Standard cataloging for school and public libraries
Title:
Standard cataloging for school and public libraries
Author:
Intner, Sheila S.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Third edition.
Publication Information:
Englewood, Colo. : Libraries Unlimited, 2001.
Physical Description:
xiv, 346 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781563087813
Format :
Book

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Z693 .I56 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

More than a how-to guide, this book promotes true understanding of the hows and whys of using standard methods and tools in the United States and Canada. Contains in-depth coverage of books, nonprint materials, Internet resources, and serials, as well as the most up-to-date versions of such basic tools as the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, Library of Congress Subject Headings, Sears List of Subject Headings, and Dewey Decimal Classification. The authors also clarify the jargon of bibliographic control, cataloging networks, and MARC coding.

With a clear and practical approach, Intner and Weihs empower neophyte and student catalogers and classifiers to apply the rules and tools of library organization to produce standard catalog records suitable for network databases or local OPACs. The book describes and explains management decisions, pros and cons of cataloging alternatives, and how to run a catalog department. Through hundreds of examples, the authors illustrate cataloging problems and their solutions, remaining true to the standards without putting the work beyond the reach of any thoughtful reader. In this new edition you'll find more in-depth coverage of books, nonprint materials, Internet resources, and serials, as well as the most up-to-date versions of such basic tools as the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, Library of Congress Subject Headings, Sears List of Subject Headings, and Dewey Decimal Classification. The authors clarify the jargon of bibliographic control, cataloging networks, and MARC coding. More than a how-to gui


Author Notes

SHEILA S. INTNER is Professor and Director, Simmons Graduate School of Library and Information Science at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts. She has received several awards, including ALA's Margaret Mann Citation Award for outstanding contributions to education for cataloging and classification.::Weihs /f Jean /b JEAN WEIHS is Principal Consultant, Technical Services Group, Toronto, Ontario. She has received the Margaret Mann Citation in Cataloging and Classification and was the first recipient of the John Comaromi Lectureship.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

School and public librarians will find this guide most helpful. After taking us through descriptive cataloging, Intner and Weihs turn to subject cataloging and the requisite discrimination of subject headings from classification. Their discussions of Dewey vis-a-vis LC and Sears vis-a-vis LCSH are practical and useful; of local systems, MARC, and bibliographic utilities, well written and down-to-earth. Their peroration on "Patron service first and foremost" is a welcome reminder of why we catalog in the first place. All told, theirs is as valid as other, more familiar cataloging texts and is arguably more useful for school and small public library catalogers--especially if they're embroiled in AV cataloging, for many of the examples are of the AV ilk (a welcome feature since most AV materials still don't come with catalog cards, and those that do often don't conform to AACR2 standards), or in Canadian cataloging, for Canadian applications and interpretations are separately discussed throughout. ~--Charles Harmon


Library Journal Review

This guide, now in its fifth edition, begins by discussing the benefits of a well-cataloged collection and the value of the "big three" access points: creator, title, subject. The text assumes a knowledge of library cataloging vocabulary and cataloging procedures, and access to secondary sources (such as Sears Lists of Subject Headings or AACR2 and RDA manuals) to complete the exercises at the end of each chapter. The layout often seems designed to hinder rather than help readers, with sometimes tiny print, figures difficult to interpret, and other elements oddly placed on the page. Inter and Weihs (coauthors, Metadata and its Impact on Libraries) present dense yet helpful discussions of the advantages and disadvantages of various cataloging systems and the challenges of cataloging information coming at an ever-faster pace and in increasingly diverse formats. Experienced librarians can use the discussions of RDA, MARC, XML, Dublin Core and other recent initiatives to give themselves an introduction to current terminology and thoughts on where cataloging is headed. VERDICT While this work has much worthy information, it is ideal for use in information science classes, when an experienced teacher and class discussion could supplement the text.-Maggie Knapp, Trinity Valley Sch., Fort Worth, TX © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Preface
Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 2 Decisions
Chapter 3 The Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules
Chapter 4 Description
Chapter 5 Access
Chapter 6 Special Application of AACR2-98
Chapter 7 Subject Authorities
Chapter 8 Sears List of Subject Headings
Chapter 9 Library of Congress Subject Headings
Chapter 10 Classification Systems
Chapter 11 The Dewey Decimal Classification
Chatper 12 Library of Congress Classification
Chapter 13 The MARC Formats
Chapter 14 Computerized Cataloging
Chapter 15 Cataloging and Classification Policies
Chapter 16 Managing the Cataloging Department