Cover image for Signac, 1863-1935
Title:
Signac, 1863-1935
Author:
Signac, Paul, 1863-1935.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Metropolitan Museum of Art ; New Haven : Yale University Press, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xii, 340 pages : illustrations (some color), color map ; 32 cm
General Note:
Catalog of an exhibition at the Grand Palais, Paris, Feb. 27-May 28, 2001, Rijksmuseum Vincent van Gogh, Amsterdam, June 18-Sept. 9, 2001, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Oct. 9-Dec. 30, 2001.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780870999987

9780870999994

9780300088601
Format :
Book

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N6853.S49 A4 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

This beautiful book examines various aspects of Signac's oeuvre and reproduces in color some two hundred of his paintings, drawings, watercolors, and prints.


Summary

This beautiful book examines various aspects of Signac's oeuvre and reproduces in color some two hundred of his paintings, drawings, watercolors, and prints.


Summary

This book, the catalogue of the first retrospective of the work of the French Neoimpressionist artist Paul Signac to be held in nearly forty years, accompanies the 2001 exhibition organised by the Reunion des Musees Nationaux/Musee d'Orsay, Paris, the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. This long overdue tribute to Signac's power of expression and artistic influence features some two hundred paintings, drawings, watercolours, and prints from public and private collections worldwide. Fully illustrated in colour and discussed in individual entries, these works offer an unprecedented overview of Signac's fifty-year career. Signac's artistic development began with the luminous plein air paintings he made in the early 1880s which reveal the lessons he absorbed from Monet, Guillaumin, and other leading Impressionists. From 1884 until 1891 Signac's close association with Georges Seurat encouraged his explorations of colour harmony, contrasts, and Neoimpressionist technique. In the scintillating works of his maturity the rigours of Pointillism gave way to richly patterned, decorative colour surfaces. In a series of essays the exhibition's curators disc


Reviews 6

Library Journal Review

This volume, which accompanies a traveling exhibition now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, is the first major overview of neoimpressionist artist Paul Signac in nearly 40 years. Tracing Signac's artistic development, the catalog effectively examines the artist's close relationship with fellow neoimpressionist Georges Seurat and shows how his interest in color, line, aesthetic harmony, and subjective experience in painting developed. The essays, written by American and French Signac scholars, demonstrate that the painter at first emulated Seurat's artistic style but then came to use more color and looser brushstrokes, and how as Signac worked more and more in the medium of watercolor, he produced some of his most successful works. Signac emerges as a theorist and critic through excerpts from his book, D'Eugne Delacroix au neo-impressionisme, in which he explained Neoimpressionism to the public. The artist's political motivations are also observed he always stood against official bourgeois conventions and in favor of liberal causes as are his efforts to support the arts in general. With beautiful illustrations and valuable, if not especially groundbreaking, information on Signac, this volume is recommended for all libraries that collect art books. Sandra Rothenberg, Framingham State Coll., MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This exhibition catalog surveys the art and reevaluates the importance of Signac, dismissed as a talented mimic of Georges Seurat and whose historical significance is reduced to being an evangelical for Neo-Impressionism. The essays and catalog entries redirect understanding of the paintings, watercolors, and graphic productions toward what John Leighton (director, Van Gogh Museum), who clearly outlines Signac's career in the introductory essay, defines as an art of continual experimentation. The other authors, including eminent Signac scholar Feretti-Bocquillon, offer discerning assessments of his accomplishments as an artist, writer, and collector as well as insights into how his life and personality affected his art. Susan Alyson Stein (Metropolitan Museum of Art), in a most informative and enlightening essay, shows the artist was a sensitive and perceptive critic of earlier masters and contemporary painters. The exhaustively detailed chronology eases the following and understanding of events in Signac's life. This book, the most recent to consider all aspects of Signac's art and life, is highly recommended for general readers and both lower- and upper-division undergraduates; graduate students and beyond will find it useful but will also need to look to more specialized sources. J. Houghton Muskegon Museum of Art


Library Journal Review

This volume, which accompanies a traveling exhibition now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, is the first major overview of neoimpressionist artist Paul Signac in nearly 40 years. Tracing Signac's artistic development, the catalog effectively examines the artist's close relationship with fellow neoimpressionist Georges Seurat and shows how his interest in color, line, aesthetic harmony, and subjective experience in painting developed. The essays, written by American and French Signac scholars, demonstrate that the painter at first emulated Seurat's artistic style but then came to use more color and looser brushstrokes, and how as Signac worked more and more in the medium of watercolor, he produced some of his most successful works. Signac emerges as a theorist and critic through excerpts from his book, D'Eugne Delacroix au neo-impressionisme, in which he explained Neoimpressionism to the public. The artist's political motivations are also observed he always stood against official bourgeois conventions and in favor of liberal causes as are his efforts to support the arts in general. With beautiful illustrations and valuable, if not especially groundbreaking, information on Signac, this volume is recommended for all libraries that collect art books. Sandra Rothenberg, Framingham State Coll., MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This exhibition catalog surveys the art and reevaluates the importance of Signac, dismissed as a talented mimic of Georges Seurat and whose historical significance is reduced to being an evangelical for Neo-Impressionism. The essays and catalog entries redirect understanding of the paintings, watercolors, and graphic productions toward what John Leighton (director, Van Gogh Museum), who clearly outlines Signac's career in the introductory essay, defines as an art of continual experimentation. The other authors, including eminent Signac scholar Feretti-Bocquillon, offer discerning assessments of his accomplishments as an artist, writer, and collector as well as insights into how his life and personality affected his art. Susan Alyson Stein (Metropolitan Museum of Art), in a most informative and enlightening essay, shows the artist was a sensitive and perceptive critic of earlier masters and contemporary painters. The exhaustively detailed chronology eases the following and understanding of events in Signac's life. This book, the most recent to consider all aspects of Signac's art and life, is highly recommended for general readers and both lower- and upper-division undergraduates; graduate students and beyond will find it useful but will also need to look to more specialized sources. J. Houghton Muskegon Museum of Art


Library Journal Review

This volume, which accompanies a traveling exhibition now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, is the first major overview of neoimpressionist artist Paul Signac in nearly 40 years. Tracing Signac's artistic development, the catalog effectively examines the artist's close relationship with fellow neoimpressionist Georges Seurat and shows how his interest in color, line, aesthetic harmony, and subjective experience in painting developed. The essays, written by American and French Signac scholars, demonstrate that the painter at first emulated Seurat's artistic style but then came to use more color and looser brushstrokes, and how as Signac worked more and more in the medium of watercolor, he produced some of his most successful works. Signac emerges as a theorist and critic through excerpts from his book, D'Eugne Delacroix au neo-impressionisme, in which he explained Neoimpressionism to the public. The artist's political motivations are also observed he always stood against official bourgeois conventions and in favor of liberal causes as are his efforts to support the arts in general. With beautiful illustrations and valuable, if not especially groundbreaking, information on Signac, this volume is recommended for all libraries that collect art books. Sandra Rothenberg, Framingham State Coll., MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This exhibition catalog surveys the art and reevaluates the importance of Signac, dismissed as a talented mimic of Georges Seurat and whose historical significance is reduced to being an evangelical for Neo-Impressionism. The essays and catalog entries redirect understanding of the paintings, watercolors, and graphic productions toward what John Leighton (director, Van Gogh Museum), who clearly outlines Signac's career in the introductory essay, defines as an art of continual experimentation. The other authors, including eminent Signac scholar Feretti-Bocquillon, offer discerning assessments of his accomplishments as an artist, writer, and collector as well as insights into how his life and personality affected his art. Susan Alyson Stein (Metropolitan Museum of Art), in a most informative and enlightening essay, shows the artist was a sensitive and perceptive critic of earlier masters and contemporary painters. The exhaustively detailed chronology eases the following and understanding of events in Signac's life. This book, the most recent to consider all aspects of Signac's art and life, is highly recommended for general readers and both lower- and upper-division undergraduates; graduate students and beyond will find it useful but will also need to look to more specialized sources. J. Houghton Muskegon Museum of Art