Cover image for Hector Protector ; and, As I went over the water : two nursery rhymes with pictures
Title:
Hector Protector ; and, As I went over the water : two nursery rhymes with pictures
Author:
Sendak, Maurice.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Harper Collins Publishers, 1993.

©1965
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 19 x 22 cm
General Note:
Originally published: New York : Harper & Row, 1965.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780060286439
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clarence Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Hamburg Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Lake Shore Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Orchard Park Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Maurice Sendak has interpreted these old' Mother Goose rhymes in animated sequences that have the aliveness and immediacy of a child's own imaginings.

There is little in these verses to suggest the settings, the characterizations, the unforeseen twists and turns of Mr. Sendak's fantastical picture-stories. They extend the boundaries of the short rhymes and add surprising dimension.

The many admirers of Where the Wild Things Are and The Nutshell Library will recognize in Hector Protector and the seafarer of As I Went Over the Water the same pugnaciousness, love of mischief, and derring-do that characterize Max and Pierre. And they will agree that Mr. Sendak has created a true picture book of astounding originality.


Author Notes

Maurice Sendak was born on June 10, 1928 in Brooklyn, New York. While in high school, he worked part time as an illustrator for All-American Comics adapting the Mutt and Jeff newspaper comic strip to a comic book format. His first professional illustrations were for a physics textbook, Atomics for the Millions, published in 1947. He later worked as a window-display director for F.A.O. Schwartz while attending night school at the Art Students League. In 1950, he illustrated his first children's book The Wonderful Farm by Marcel Aymé. He wrote his first children's book Kenny's Window in 1956 and went on to become a prolific author-illustrator.

His works include Chicken Soup with Rice; In the Night Kitchen; Outside Over There; Higglety Pigglety Pop; The Sign on Rosie's Door; We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy; Brundibar; Bumble Ardy; and My Brother's Book. He received numerous awards including the Caldecott medal for Where The Wild Things Are in 1964, the Hans Christian Andersen International Medal in 1970, the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, and the National Medal of Arts in 1996.

Characters from two of his books were the basis of an animated television special, Really Rosie, which first aired in 1975. He was also the set designer and lyricist for a subsequent off-Broadway musical of the same title. He was the lyricist, as well as the set and costume designer, for the original production of an opera based on Where The Wild Things Are in 1980. In addition, he has designed sets and costumes for performances of operas by Mozart, Prokofiev, and other classical composers. He died due to complications from a recent stroke on May 8, 2012 at the age of 83.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Now in its second season, HarperCollins's reissue of 22 Sendak classics continues. This time, his collaborations with Ruth Krauss take center stage. In Charlotte and the White Horse, first published in 1955, creamy pages frame Sendak's softly lit illustrations of a girl who convinces her father to keep a wobbly legged horse and cares for him until he can stand on his own. Sendak's delicate watercolors suit the dream-like mood of a boy who accomplishes all that he sets out to do in his imaginary world, in I Want to Paint My Bathroom Blue (1956), also by Krauss. A boy's imagination also comes to the fore in A Very Special House (1953) by Krauss, as the artist depicts the hero creating a home filled with a turtle, a giant, a very old lion and "some monkeys and some skunkeys." Oversize pages brim with the creatures as well as his house's "very special" furnishings. Open House for Butterflies (1960) takes a similar format to these collaborators' classic A Hole Is to Dig, and lastly, Hector Protector and As I Went Over the Water: Two Nursery Rhymes (1965) by Sendak conveys as much plot through the artist's wordless spreads as with the minimal text. For collectors and budding readers alike. Nov. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Google Preview