Cover image for Noisy Nora
Title:
Noisy Nora
Author:
Wells, Rosemary.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Viking, 1999.

©1997
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
Feeling neglected, Nora makes more and more noise to attract her parents' attention.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
320 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.6 0.5 18639.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.8 1 Quiz: 08462 Guided reading level: I.
ISBN:
9780670887224
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clarence Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Concord Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Grand Island Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Frank E. Merriweather Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Hamburg Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Orchard Park Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

It's tough being the middle mouse. No one's paying any attention to Nora, so she decides to do something her family can't ignore: make noise. Nora slams windows, bangs doors, and upsets furniture, to no avail. It's not until she crashes out the door--and the house goes strangely silent--that her family realizes: a noisy Nora is much better than no Nora at all."A wonderful story." -- Booklist


Author Notes

Rosemary Wells was born in New York City on January 29, 1943. She studied at the Museum School in Boston. Without her degree, she left school at the age of 19 to get married. She began her career in publishing, working as an art editor and designer first at Allyn and Bacon and later at Macmillan Publishing.

She is an author and illustrator of over 60 books for children and young adults. Her first book was an illustrated edition of Gilbert and Sullivan's I Have a Song to Sing-O. Her other works include Martha's Birthday, The Fog Comes on Little Pig Feet, Unfortunately Harriet, Mary on Horseback, and Timothy Goes to School. She also created the characters of Max and Ruby, Noisy Nora, and Yoko, which are featured in some of her books. She has won numerous awards including a Children's Book Council Award for Noisy Nora in 1974, the Edgar Allan Poe award for two young adult books, Through the Looking Glass and When No One Was Looking, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Shy Charles.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 3^-6. Nora mouse is tired of having her sibs get all the attention. But her attempts to gain some spotlight for herself are destined to failure--until she realizes that stopping her noisy mischief will get her family to take notice. Published originally in 1973 in a small format, with pen-and-ink illustrations brightened by splashes of color, this funny, endearing story is now available in an enlarged format with new, full-color art. Although the new artwork preserves both the spirit and the settings of the original pictures (and adds many wonderful details), it greatly alters the balance of the picture book. In the older version, the lively, rhythmic text predominated; here, it's the colorful pictures that speak loudest. A wonderful story, no matter which version you have on your shelves. --Stephanie Zvirin


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1‘All new illustrations infuse this much-loved picture book (Dial, 1973) with energy. Vibrant colors and a larger format make the characters seem to jump out at readers. The original book's sweet, subdued pen-and-ink drawings were a mere appetizer when compared to the feast of colors here, all created from a combination of watercolor, India ink, gouache, pencil, and acrylics. Keeping each scene in a nearly framed vignette, Wells defines and details her illustrations even more than before. The eye-catching drawings and altered word groupings make the story flow better; words and pictures enhance one another to achieve the smooth narrative so necessary for storytelling. Some other differences between new and old: father has given up his pipe; kitchen knives aren't left on the table; and some architectural changes have placed the stair banister on the correct side so Nora won't topple off the side while flying her brother's kite. Nora, the delightful protagonist of the story, is the same; her dilemma hasn't changed one iota. This middle child who continually makes noise to get her parents' attention is really noticed when the silence from her absence saddens her family and starts them hunting for her. This is a Nora for the `90s!‘Susan Garland, Maynard Public Library, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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