Cover image for The magic of ordinary days
Title:
The magic of ordinary days
Author:
Creel, Ann Howard.
Personal Author:
Edition:
[Large print edition].
Publication Information:
Waterville, Me. : Thorndike Press, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
391 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780786237418
Format :
Book

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Summary

Author Notes

Ann Howard Creel was born on July 24, 1953. By the age of ten she was writing daily in a diary, and by the age of twelve she had written a novel. She attended the University of Texas, received a degree in nursing, and became a Registered Nurse. After moving to California in 1985 she went back to school and earned a Master's degree. She loved her nursing career, but the urge to write never left her, so she began to write again at night after work when she moved to Colorado. She took two creative writing courses in Durango, Colorado and then wrote her first novel, Water at the Blue Earth. She still works as a school nurse in the Denver area and writes part-time. Her titles include A Ceiling of Stars, Call Me the Canyon, and The Magic of the Ordinary Days.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

This is the first adult novel by an author who has written two well-received YA books. Livvy Dunne is a thoughtful 24-year-old with yearnings toward archeology, who in a rash moment in WWII Colorado becomes pregnant by a dashing officer and is forced into a marriage of convenience by her sternly puritanical minister father. She goes off to Ray Singleton's remote farm knowing nothing about him except that he is lonely, utterly inexperienced around women and touchingly devoted to her. The relationship between the two, graced by some delicate, perceptive and fine-boned writing, is at the heart of the book, and Creel gets it all just right. She is also skilled at evoking the peculiar remoteness from the war of the high plains country, where farmers were regarded as an integral part of the war effort and even got enough gas to drive around for pleasure, a rare privilege in 1944. Lonesome Livvy yearns for more communicative companionship, however, and grows close to a pair of charming Nisei sisters at an internment camp and this is where plot devices begin to play an unwarranted role. For Rose and Lorelei, it turns out, will do anything for love and involve Livvy in what develops into a dangerous (and inherently improbable) exercise in deceit and manipulation. The book recovers its stride for a poignant if rather hasty finish, but the calm spell cast by the tale of Livvy and Ray, which would have been perfectly satisfactory to maintain the book, has been broken. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved