Cover image for Hate crimes
Title:
Hate crimes
Author:
Roleff, Tamara L., 1959-
Publication Information:
San Diego, CA : Greenhaven Press, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
154 pages ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Are hate crimes a serious problem? -- Should hate speech be restricted? -- Are federal hate crime laws necessary? -- Which groups pose a threat to society?
ISBN:
9780737704549

9780737704532
Format :
Book

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HV6773.52 .H365 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Hate crimes are those perpetrated against a particular individual or group solely because of their race, religion, or sexual orientation. As American society strives to become more tolerant and accepting of diversity, awareness of such crimes has increased--with some arguing that individuals who commit hate-based crimes receive harsher penalties than those who commit similarly violent offenses. Authors explore the issue in the following chapters: Are Hate Crimes a Serious Problem? Should Special Penalties Apply to Hate Crimes? Should Hate Speech Be Restricted? What Groups Pose a Threat to Society?


Summary

Hate crimes are those perpetrated against a particular individual or group solely because of their race, religion, or sexual orientation. As American society strives to become more tolerant and accepting of diversity, awareness of such crimes has increased--with some arguing that individuals who commit hate-based crimes receive harsher penalties than those who commit similarly violent offenses. Authors explore the issue in the following chapters: Are Hate Crimes a Serious Problem? Should Special Penalties Apply to Hate Crimes? Should Hate Speech Be Restricted? What Groups Pose a Threat to Society?


Author Notes

Tamara L. Roleff is a published author and an editor of young adult books. Some of the published credits of Tamara L. Roleff include The Olympics (At Issue Series), Genetic Engineering (Compact Research Series), Body Piercing and Tattoos (At Issue Series).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 6^-12. This Current Controversies volume of essays offers readers more than usual by branching into many subtopics. In the first section, writers attempt to define the term hate crime and answer the question, "Are hate crimes a problem?" arguing their points in relation to specific groups, most often women and gays. The second section presents seven essays about hate speech on campuses and the Internet, and in mainstream society. Section three deals with hate-crime laws, and includes some alarming, extremist articles that question the need for intervention. The last section discusses groups that pose a threat to society. The fuzzy parameters of the topic result in arguments that tend to stray toward extremes, but it's the often the writer's passion that makes the reading so compelling. --Roger Leslie


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-This revised edition is as timely and relevant as its predecessor by Paul Winters (Greenhaven, 1996). The text is organized by four broad chapters: "Are Hate Crimes a Serious Problem?"; "Should Hate Speech Be Restricted?"; "Are Federal Hate Crime Laws Necessary?"; and "Which Groups Pose a Threat to Society?" Each chapter begins with an overview and then both sides of the question are addressed by various writers and/or experts in the field, such as President Clinton; First Amendment advocate Nat Hentoff; Howard Berkowitz, national chairman of the Anti-Defamation League; and Cathy Young, vice president of the Women's Freedom Network. Issues addressed include gender, racial, and sexual-orientation based crimes, and campus speech codes and the Internet are also considered. Selected texts come from sources such as The Advocate, a national gay and lesbian newsmagazine; The Los Angeles Times; University of Pennsylvania Law Review; and CQ Researcher. The result is a balanced, reasonable text that presents all sides fairly and helps researchers realize the nuances of a complex issue. A list of organizations with contact information and a detailed index are appended. For libraries that serve students who routinely need information for speeches, debates, and social studies classes, this volume delivers.-Marilyn Heath, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 6^-12. This Current Controversies volume of essays offers readers more than usual by branching into many subtopics. In the first section, writers attempt to define the term hate crime and answer the question, "Are hate crimes a problem?" arguing their points in relation to specific groups, most often women and gays. The second section presents seven essays about hate speech on campuses and the Internet, and in mainstream society. Section three deals with hate-crime laws, and includes some alarming, extremist articles that question the need for intervention. The last section discusses groups that pose a threat to society. The fuzzy parameters of the topic result in arguments that tend to stray toward extremes, but it's the often the writer's passion that makes the reading so compelling. --Roger Leslie


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-This revised edition is as timely and relevant as its predecessor by Paul Winters (Greenhaven, 1996). The text is organized by four broad chapters: "Are Hate Crimes a Serious Problem?"; "Should Hate Speech Be Restricted?"; "Are Federal Hate Crime Laws Necessary?"; and "Which Groups Pose a Threat to Society?" Each chapter begins with an overview and then both sides of the question are addressed by various writers and/or experts in the field, such as President Clinton; First Amendment advocate Nat Hentoff; Howard Berkowitz, national chairman of the Anti-Defamation League; and Cathy Young, vice president of the Women's Freedom Network. Issues addressed include gender, racial, and sexual-orientation based crimes, and campus speech codes and the Internet are also considered. Selected texts come from sources such as The Advocate, a national gay and lesbian newsmagazine; The Los Angeles Times; University of Pennsylvania Law Review; and CQ Researcher. The result is a balanced, reasonable text that presents all sides fairly and helps researchers realize the nuances of a complex issue. A list of organizations with contact information and a detailed index are appended. For libraries that serve students who routinely need information for speeches, debates, and social studies classes, this volume delivers.-Marilyn Heath, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.