Cover image for Early adopter voiceXML
Title:
Early adopter voiceXML
Author:
Andersson, Eve Astrid.
Publication Information:
Birmingham [England] : Wrox Press, Ltd., [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
v, 309 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781861005625
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library TK7895.S65 E27 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

VoiceXML brings the power of voice to the Web - the information we are used to accessing through the visual web interfaces of our PCs and mobile devices can now be accessed through speech alone. Building on the functionality already seen in IVR applications deployed by our banks and utility companies, the tag based syntax of VoiceXML will instantly be familiar to existing web developers, and applications can already be deployed using one of the many voice portals available.


Table of Contents

Introductionp. 1
Who is this Book for?p. 1
What does the Book Cover?p. 1
What do I Need to Use this Book?p. 2
Conventionsp. 2
Customer Supportp. 3
Tell Us What You Thinkp. 4
Chapter 1 Introduction to Voice Technologiesp. 7
Voice Technology Historyp. 8
The Voice Architecturep. 8
Thinking in VoiceXMLp. 10
Dialog Flow and Controlp. 11
Speech Recognitionp. 11
Responding to the Userp. 12
VoiceXML: Practical Usesp. 13
Advantages and Disadvantagesp. 14
The Futurep. 15
The VoiceXML 2.0 Specificationp. 15
The Far Futurep. 16
Chapter 2 Getting Started with VoiceXMLp. 19
Development Environmentsp. 19
Voice Gatewaysp. 20
Our First VoiceXML Applicationp. 29
Standalone Voice Software Development Kitsp. 31
VoiceXML Editors and Validatorsp. 32
Deploymentp. 33
Application Service Provider (ASP) Modelp. 33
Gateway Modelp. 34
In-House Modelp. 34
Chapter 3 VoiceXML Grammarsp. 39
The Role of the Grammarp. 39
Grammar Definition Languagesp. 40
Grammars in VoiceXMLp. 41
DTMF Grammarsp. 43
Grammar Scope in VoiceXML Documentsp. 44
Java Speech Grammar Formatp. 45
Nuance Grammar Specification Languagep. 51
Built-In Grammars in VoiceXMLp. 55
Grammar Processingp. 56
Chapter 4 Basic VoiceXMLp. 59
XML Syntax and VoiceXMLp. 60
Documentation and Resourcesp. 60
Structure of a VoiceXML Applicationp. 61
Starting a VoiceXML Documentp. 63
Delivering Contentp. 64
[left angle bracket]prompt[right angle bracket]p. 64
[left angle bracket]audio[right angle bracket]p. 65
Improving TTS with Speech Markupp. 66
Collecting User Inputp. 68
Form Basics by Examplep. 68
Menus with [left angle bracket]menu[right angle bracket], [left angle bracket]choice[right angle bracket], and [left angle bracket]enumerate[right angle bracket]p. 73
Using [left angle bracket]option[right angle bracket] Elements in a [left angle bracket]field[right angle bracket]p. 74
Form Interpretationp. 75
Form and Field Itemsp. 75
The Form Interpretation Algorithmp. 78
A FIA Examplep. 81
Chapter 5 Advanced VoiceXML Markupp. 85
Programming Elementsp. 86
Variables and Expressionsp. 86
Branching Elementsp. 92
Event Handlingp. 93
Navigationp. 98
Objectsp. 104
Propertiesp. 106
Mixed Initiative Formsp. 107
Chapter 6 Good Application Designp. 113
A General Processp. 114
Analysisp. 114
Designp. 116
Implementationp. 116
Evaluationp. 116
Promptingp. 117
Confirmationp. 119
Brief Promptsp. 119
Polite Promptsp. 120
Menusp. 120
Auditory Iconsp. 120
Use of DTMFp. 121
Use of Barge-inp. 122
Consistencyp. 123
Error Handlingp. 124
Error Preventionp. 124
Error Recoveryp. 125
Grammarp. 125
Application Personalityp. 127
Learningp. 128
On-site Learningp. 128
Profile-based Learningp. 132
Usability Testingp. 132
Summaryp. 133
Chapter 7 VoiceXML with XSLT (HTML and WML)p. 135
A Very Brief Overview of XSLTp. 136
Documentation and Resourcesp. 137
MyRubberBands.com--A Case Studyp. 138
A Look at the Legacy Databasep. 140
Creating a Markup Languagep. 142
Schema by Examplep. 142
VoiceXML by XSLTp. 146
WML with XSLTp. 155
HTML with XSLTp. 157
Chapter 8 Adding VoiceXML to an Existing Web Sitep. 163
Web Site Overviewp. 164
Adding a Voice Interfacep. 164
Cookies and Loggingp. 165
Differences between VoiceXML and HTMLp. 166
Implementation choicesp. 166
Tailoring Content for TTSp. 167
Writing for Phone and Webp. 170
The Back Endp. 170
The Voice-Enabled News Interfacep. 172
Code Organizationp. 172
The Header File: vxml-header.phpp. 173
Storing statep. 173
Root.php: The Application Root Documentp. 174
Index.phpp. 175
Story.phpp. 179
Delivering Audio to the Telephonep. 181
User interfacep. 182
Summaryp. 184
Chapter 9 Dynamic VoiceXML with ASPp. 187
Understanding the Problemp. 187
Devising a Planp. 189
Generating Dynamic VoiceXML Using ASPp. 190
Programming Outlookp. 190
Setting up the Development Environmentp. 191
Carrying Out the Planp. 192
Getting Startedp. 193
Retrieving E-Mailp. 199
Sending E-Mailp. 207
Retrieving Appointmentsp. 209
Scheduling Appointmentsp. 215
Notification of New E-Mailsp. 216
Looking Backp. 218
Chapter 10 Nuance SpeechObjectsp. 221
SpeechObjects Theoryp. 223
Foundation SpeechObjects in VoiceXMLp. 225
Your Own SpeechObjectsp. 229
The Spelling Problemp. 229
Creating SOSpellp. 229
Using SOSpellp. 240
Future Upgradesp. 244
Summaryp. 244
Chapter 11 The Futurep. 247
WAP and VoiceXML--Joint Initiative?p. 247
The Old Way: Multiple Channels, Multiple Authoringp. 248
The New Way: Common Interaction Designp. 248
Multi-Modal Applicationsp. 251
VoiceXML 2.0--Likely Changes and Modificationsp. 254
A Look Far into the Futurep. 256
Appendix A VoiceXML Syntax Referencep. 259
Appendix B Useful Resourcesp. 285
Indexp. 291

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