Cover image for Truelove
Title:
Truelove
Author:
Cole, Babette.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, 2001.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 25 cm
Summary:
When a new baby arrives, Truelove the dog must teach his family that there is enough love to go around.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.3 0.5 56421.
ISBN:
9780803727175
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Truelove is a puppy who adores his family. But when a new baby arrives, Truelove begins to feel left out. He loses his spot on the bed, gets yelled at for sharing his mouse, and when he tries to tell his family how much he loves them, they put him outside for singing too loud. How can Truelove show his family what real love is all about? With her trademark humor and irresistible illustrations, Babette Cole has created a book that is both tongue-in-cheek and touching. Even though love isn't easy, Truelove reminds us there's always enough to go around.


Author Notes

Babette Cole was born in Jersey in the Channel Islands on September 10, 1950. She received a first-class degree and a distinction in animation from Canterbury College of Art in 1973. She got a job in children's television, working on programs including Bagpuss and Jackanory. She also designed greetings cards and illustrated stories by authors such as Joan Tate and Annabel Farjeon.

Her first picture book, Basil Brush of the Yard, was published in 1977. She wrote and illustrated more than 150 children's books including Nungu and the Hippopotamus, Doctor Dog, Mummy Laid an Egg, The Smelly Book, Beware of the Vet, Two of Everything, Hair in Funny Places, and The Trouble with series. Princess Smartypants and Prince Cinders both won the Kate Greenaway medal. She died after a short illness that led to a collapsed lung on January 15, 2017 at the age of 66.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4-8. "Now that they have a new baby, will there be enough love for both of us?" asks the spotted, anxiety-ridden pooch True Love. In the following spreads, sappy aphorisms about love--"Love cures all hurt," "Love gives you strength" --contrast with drawings of True Love trying unsuccessfully to win the attention of his infant-absorbed owners. Feeling neglected and unloved, True Love sets out with hobo's kerchief and stick and joins a pack of stray dogs on a wild adventure. All ends well when the owners show there's enough love for True Love as well as for all of his new friends. The choice of aphorisms rather than narrative text results in a somewhat disjointed read, but Cole's trademark subversive humor and her scribbly cartoon drawings will keep kids giggling. Young ones jealous of a new baby will like the reassuring message: "sometimes love isn't easy, but there's always enough to go around." --Gillian Engberg


Publisher's Weekly Review

Truelove, the neglected pooch of new (human) parents, joins a pack of runaway hounds. PW said, "Busy families may cast a guilty eye toward their loyal pets; displaced older siblings will relate to Cole's generous, and not at all misnamed, hero." Ages 4-8. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-A dog must teach its family that there is enough love to go around when a new baby arrives. On double-page spreads, platitudes like "Love means sharing" face hilarious illustrations of the consequences, such as Truelove offering a mouse to the baby. "Love makes your heart sing" shows the pooch belting out "I Loo-ve yooou-Wooo! Wooo! Wooo!" and then being ushered out the door by the frazzled parents, infant screaming. Chock-full of Cole's humor and trademark cartoons, the story shows that love really does conquer all. It's all very funny, but adults are likely to appreciate the humor much more than children will. Rosemary Wells's McDuff and the Baby (Hyperion, 1997) is a better choice for youngsters coping with sharing their parents with a new sibling.-Linda M. Kenton, San Rafael Public Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.