Cover image for In the days of the pharaohs : a look at ancient Egypt
Title:
In the days of the pharaohs : a look at ancient Egypt
Author:
Meltzer, Milton, 1915-2009.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Franklin Watts, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
159 pages : illustrations, map ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1060 Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC 6-8 8.3 7 Quiz: 31708 Guided reading level: V.
ISBN:
9780531117910
Format :
Book

Available:*

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DT61 .M52 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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DT61 .M52 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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DT61 .M52 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Young Adult
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Summary

Summary

Among the topics discussed are how people in ancient Egypt worshipped their gods, how their government operated, what their family life was like, and what kinds of games the children played. Readers will learn about such fascinating practices as mummification, which the Egyptians used to preserve the bodies of their dead in order to honor them. Also discussed is how this vital culture changed and developed throughout the reigns of the pharaohs.


Author Notes

Historian Milton Meltzer was born in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1915. He attended Columbia University, but had to leave during his senior year because of the Great Depression. He got a job writing for the WPA Federal Theater Project. During World War II, he served as an air traffic controller in the Army Air Corps. After the war, he worked as a writer for CBS radio and in public relations for Pfizer.

In 1956, he published his first book A Pictorial History of the Negro American, which was co-written by Langston Hughes. They also collaborated on Langston Hughes: A Biography, which was published in 1968 and received the Carter G. Woodson award. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 110 books for young people including Brother, Can You Spare a Dime? about the stock market crash that led to the Great Depression; Never to Forget about the Holocaust; and There Comes a Time about the Civil Rights movement. He also addressed such topics as crime, ancient Egypt, the immigrant experience, labor movements, photography, piracy, poverty, racism, and slavery. He wrote numerous biographies including ones on Mary McLeod Bethune, Lydia Maria Child, Dorothea Lange, Margaret Sanger, and Henry David Thoreau. He received the 2000 Regina Medal and the 2001 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for his body of work and his lasting contribution to children's literature. He died of esophageal cancer on September 19, 2009 at the age of 94.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 6-12. Among the many books on ancient Egypt, this one stands out. Instead of exploring the culture chronologically, Meltzer has used a topical arrangement, with chapters covering the Nile, government and leadership, wars, spiritual beliefs, family, women, and, of course, the pyramids and hieroglyphics. The information is sophisticated enough to be useful for world history research papers; it is also accessible and straightforward enough to provide an introduction to ancient Egyptian culture. Sweeping historic movements and meticulous details of everyday life are effectively balanced with a sense of what's still being uncovered by archaeologists. Thick, quality paper and a beautiful, glossy, full-color insert add to this handsome, useful volume, which, thanks to a fine blend of intelligent, informative text and an abundance of photographs and sketches, will be equally appropriate for middle-and high-school readers. --Roger Leslie


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-In a clear, direct format, Meltzer presents what we know about ancient Egypt and how we know it. He begins by explaining that the advent of agriculture allowed the creation of a social structure in the Nile valley. The well-preserved artifacts of that society have given us amazing insight into how people lived. The author touches upon such popular subjects as war, pharaohs, pyramids, making mummies, hieroglyphics, and family life. Meltzer also conveys how these ancient discoveries have contributed to contemporary knowledge, for example, plants suitable for use in medicines. The writing is concise and easy to read. Black-and-white reproductions break up the text in the short chapters. Sixteen pages of color plates make the book more visually exciting. A worthwhile, informative addition.-Be Astengo, Alachua County Library, Gainesville, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.