Cover image for Walt in Wonderland : the silent films of Walt Disney
Title:
Walt in Wonderland : the silent films of Walt Disney
Author:
Merritt, Russell.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Walt in wonderland. Italian & English.
Edition:
Revised, English language edition.
Publication Information:
Pordenone, Italy : Giornate del Cinema Muto ; Baltimore, Md. : Distributed by Johns Hopkins University Press, [1993]

©1993
Physical Description:
164 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), portraits, facsimiles ; 27 cm
General Note:
Originally published in English and Italian under title: Nel paese delle meraviglie.
Language:
English
Contents:
Disney's cat and rabbit years -- Newman Laugh-O-grams -- Laugh-O-gram Films -- Lafflets -- Tommy Tucker's tooth -- Martha -- Alice's Wonderland -- First Alice series -- Second Alice series -- Third Alice series -- Oswald the lucky rabbit -- Arrival of Mickey Mouse.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9788886155021

9780801849077
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
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NC1766.U52 D54813 1993 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

During the Roaring Twenties--from 1921 through 1928--Walt Disney and his friends made more than ninety silent cartoons, turning them out as often as one or two per month. Years before Mickey Mouse, the young entrepreneur recruited and nurtured an extraord


Summary

During the Roaring Twenties--from 1921 through 1928--Walt Disney and his friends made more than ninety silent cartoons, turning them out as often as one or two per month. Years before Mickey Mouse, the young entrepreneur recruited and nurtured an extraordinary array of talented people. Drawing on interviews with Disney's coworkers, Disney's business papers, promotional materials, scripts, drawings, and correspondence, the richly illustrated Walt in Wonderland reconstructs Disney's silent film career and places his early films in critical perspective.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

There are plenty of coffee-table books on the films of Walt Disney, one, it seems, for virtually each Disney feature. This tome's different, though. It's a serious look at the silent films Disney made in the 1920s before he revolutionized the industry with the first sound cartoon, Steamboat Willie. Its first section affords an incisive critical overview, showing how these early, often pedestrian "apprentice" films--which reflected Disney's midwestern values and showed the influence of live-action comedies--laid the groundwork for later animation techniques and conventions. Many characteristics of these cartoons resurfaced in Disney's later work--particularly the personality-based comedy that was as integral to the popularity of Mickey Mouse as initially was the gimmick of sound. The book's lengthier second section, based on studio records, promotional materials, and interviews with survivors, is a detailed history of this period of Disneyana. An important and valuable contribution to film scholarship. ~--Gordon Flagg


Choice Review

Scholarship has rarely been so engaging and charming as in Merritt and Kaufman's detailed study of the silent film animation of Walt Disney. The work is, simply, wonderful. With thorough research ferreting out such previously uncollected materials as publicity stills, frame enlargements, cartoon story panels, articles from Universal Weekly (1922-36), and sundry archival correspondence, the authors have fleshed out the image of Disney the undeterred artist/entrepreneur. They showcase the sketchy characters of the Alice cartoon comedies and Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, demonstrating that Mickey did not spring into existence like Minerva, but enjoyed a genealogical tradition of film technique and comic gags. The study both details the economic and political vicissitudes of young Disney and sheds light on friends and collaborators like Ub Iwerks, who shared his vision. The impressive annotated filmography of Disney silent cartoons from 1921 to 1928 and the exquisite artwork enhance the critical analysis and make this work one of the most significant, scintillating, and pleasurable texts to be published this year. Knowledge and delight have rarely been wedded so well. Recommended with animated enthusiasm. T. Lindvall; Regent University


Booklist Review

There are plenty of coffee-table books on the films of Walt Disney, one, it seems, for virtually each Disney feature. This tome's different, though. It's a serious look at the silent films Disney made in the 1920s before he revolutionized the industry with the first sound cartoon, Steamboat Willie. Its first section affords an incisive critical overview, showing how these early, often pedestrian "apprentice" films--which reflected Disney's midwestern values and showed the influence of live-action comedies--laid the groundwork for later animation techniques and conventions. Many characteristics of these cartoons resurfaced in Disney's later work--particularly the personality-based comedy that was as integral to the popularity of Mickey Mouse as initially was the gimmick of sound. The book's lengthier second section, based on studio records, promotional materials, and interviews with survivors, is a detailed history of this period of Disneyana. An important and valuable contribution to film scholarship. ~--Gordon Flagg


Choice Review

Scholarship has rarely been so engaging and charming as in Merritt and Kaufman's detailed study of the silent film animation of Walt Disney. The work is, simply, wonderful. With thorough research ferreting out such previously uncollected materials as publicity stills, frame enlargements, cartoon story panels, articles from Universal Weekly (1922-36), and sundry archival correspondence, the authors have fleshed out the image of Disney the undeterred artist/entrepreneur. They showcase the sketchy characters of the Alice cartoon comedies and Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, demonstrating that Mickey did not spring into existence like Minerva, but enjoyed a genealogical tradition of film technique and comic gags. The study both details the economic and political vicissitudes of young Disney and sheds light on friends and collaborators like Ub Iwerks, who shared his vision. The impressive annotated filmography of Disney silent cartoons from 1921 to 1928 and the exquisite artwork enhance the critical analysis and make this work one of the most significant, scintillating, and pleasurable texts to be published this year. Knowledge and delight have rarely been wedded so well. Recommended with animated enthusiasm. T. Lindvall; Regent University