Cover image for Space exploration
Title:
Space exploration
Author:
Farndon, John.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Brookfield, Conn. : Copper Beech Books, 2001.
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm.
Summary:
Describes space exploration through the use of telescopes, satellites, observatories, rockets, exploratory vehicles, and astronauts.
General Note:
Includes index.

At head of title : Awesome space.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780761324119
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library TL793 .F35 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Newstead Library TL793 .F35 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library TL793 .F35 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clearfield Library TL793 .F35 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library TL793 .F35 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lancaster Library TL793 .F35 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Anna M. Reinstein Library TL793 .F35 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library TL793 .F35 2001 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Describes space exploration through the use of telescopes, satellites, observatories, rockets, exploratory vehicles, and astronauts.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-Bright colors, eye-filling mixes of graphic and photographic images, short blocks of large-type text, and side comments pumped up by "zoom in on-" and "Awesome facts" headers may be well calculated to get the attention of younger readers, but Farndon's uneven, ineptly written narratives won't hold it. In Space Exploration, which flits past a huge range of topics from telescopes to astronaut training to the International Space Station, the author explains over and over how multistage rockets work, but assumes his readers will already know the meanings of "inner planets," "galaxies," and other astronomical terms. He also refers confusingly to "radio rays" in describing what radiotelescopes do, and his prose sometimes reads like a clumsy translation. Sun and Other Stars is more focused, but the author again seems unsure whether he's addressing total beginners in matters astronomical, or children who have already been exposed to the subject. Except for the incorrect assertion that "the equator is the closest point on the Earth to the Sun" (actually true only twice a year), he does get his facts straight, but the variable quality of the overall presentation places these behind relevant titles in the "SuperSmarts" series (Candlewick), Carole Stott's Space Exploration (DK, 2000), and similar introductions. The lack of any links to paper or electronic information sources is a further weakness.-John Peters, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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