Cover image for The wing on a flea : a book about shapes
Title:
The wing on a flea : a book about shapes
Author:
Emberley, Ed.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Boston : Little, Brown, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 20 x 27 cm
Summary:
Simple rhyming text and illustrations guide the reader to see triangles, rectangles, and circles in everyday things.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780316234870
Format :
Book

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Clarence Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction A-B-C- 1-2-3 Books
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Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Elma Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Grand Island Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Hamburg Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Niagara Branch Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Originally published 40 years ago, this book uses vivid illustrations and simple rhyming text by a noted author/illustrator to introduce the concept of shapes and sizes to curious young readers as he suggests how they can view the world in a new and exciting way. Full-color illustrations.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

A pair of reissued books makes available the launches of two significant careers. The Wing on a Flea: A Book About Shapes, Ed Emberley's first book, published in 1961, makes an affable companion to his playful yet instructive series of drawing books. His breezy, rhyming text and cheerful visuals invite kids to explore the concept of shapes. More subtly, aspiring artists can follow Emberley's example of using basic shapes to create more complex pictures. Black pages effectively show off the bold, primary colors and shiny, gold leaf accents of the deceptively simple pictures. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-K-A newly illustrated version of a 1961 edition. A rhyming text points out some of the places in which basic geometric shapes can be found in life situations. For example, "A circle could be a little green pea,/or eyes in the dark, if you'll just look and see." Although circles, triangles, and rectangles are addressed separately in the text, most of the illustrations are composed of a combination of these shapes. The train with circular wheels pulls a rectangular circus wagon flying triangular flags, etc. The shapes are illustrated with flat, solid colors on a black background, giving a childlike, cheerful appearance appropriate for introducing the concept. Readers who have developed affection for the whimsical, humorous line drawings found in the original may be disconcerted by the new style. However, libraries that do not have the older edition and those looking for a simple, straightforward approach to basic shapes will find this one an attractive option.-Adele Greenlee, Bethel College, St. Paul, MN (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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