Cover image for The novels of the Harlem renaissance : twelve black writers, 1923-1933
Title:
The novels of the Harlem renaissance : twelve black writers, 1923-1933
Author:
Singh, Amritjit.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
University Park : Pennsylvania State University Press, [1976]

©1976
Physical Description:
175 pages ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1520 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780271012087
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS374.N4 S5 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Frank E. Merriweather Library PS374.N4 S5 Adult Non-Fiction Black History Non-Circ
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Summary

Summary

[Singh] gives us a sober, sensitive, and well-digested analysis of twelve black novelists of the Harlem Renaissance in an attempt to focus on 'interracial issues of self-definition, class, caste, and color in the work these writers.' The twelve writers discussed are Bontemps, Cullen, DuBois, Redmon Fauset, Fisher, Hughes, Larsen, McKay, Schuyler, Thurman, Toomer, and White. It can be said that not all of these writers are of the first rank, nor do they exhaust the complex history of the Renaissance they represent. But the strength of Singh's study is in its extensions into the ideological and cultural history of America in the Twenties-a history which is as much on the main highway as the history of the American Jazz Age. -World Literature Today


Author Notes

Amritjit Singh is Professor of English and African-American Studies at Rhode Island College. He is author of The Magic Circle of Henry James (1989) and The Harlem Renaissance: Revaluations (1989).


Table of Contents

1 "When The Negro Was In Vogue"p. 1
The Harlem Renaissance and Black America in the Twenties
2 Race And Sexp. 41
Approaches to Self-Definition
3 The Dicties And The Shinesp. 71
Class in Black America
4 "Fooling Our White Folks"p. 89
Color Caste in American Life
5 The Burden Of Blacknessp. 105
Color in Afro-America and Beyond
Epiloguep. 129
A Review of Previous Research and Criticismp. 135
Notesp. 139
Bibliographyp. 153
Indexp. 165

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