Cover image for I dreamed I was a ballerina
Title:
I dreamed I was a ballerina
Author:
Pavlova, Anna, 1881-1931.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Metropolitan Museum of Art : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : illustrations (some color) ; 28 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 900 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.1 0.5 55164.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.7 1 Quiz: 26649 Guided reading level: M.
ISBN:
9780870999888

9780689846762
Format :
Book

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Central Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Hamburg Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Audubon Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Every girl remembers her first trip to the ballet: the anticipation beforehand, the orchestra's first notes, the ethereal beauty of the ballerinas. This is a tale of one such girl who was caught up in ballet's mesmerizing spell and became one of the greatest ballerinas of all time. In a story drawn from her memoirs, Anna Pavlova describes her first visit to the ballet to see the Sleeping Beauty. With simple, childlike language, she captures her love for her mother, the splendor of the ballet, and the moments that changed her life. The words are matched with paintings, pastels, and drawings of the French Impressionist Edgar Degas, to give this story all the magic of a fairytale. Complete with short biographies of Pavlova and Degas, I Dreamed I Was a Ballerina will delight any child with ballerina dreams.


Summary

Every girl remembers her first trip to the ballet: the anticipation beforehand, the orchestra's first notes, the ethereal beauty of the ballerinas. This is a tale of one such girl who was caught up in ballet's mesmerizing spell and became one of the greatest ballerinas of all time.In a story drawn from her memoirs, Anna Pavlova describes her first visit to the ballet to see the Sleeping Beauty. With simple, childlike language, she captures her love for her mother, the splendor of the ballet, and the moments that changed her life. The words are matched with paintings, pastels, and drawings of the French Impressionist Edgar Degas, to give this story all the magic of a fairytale.Complete with short biographies of Pavlova and Degas, I Dreamed I Was a Ballerina will delight any child with ballerina dreams.


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Gr. 3-5. This unusual book features the words of Anna Pavlova paired with paintings by Edgar Degas. Pavlova relates how her childhood experience of attending a ballet inspired her love of dance and her ambition to become a ballerina. Though the paintings are not illustrations of the text, they accompany it quite amiably, particularly in the many ballet scenes. It seems doubtful that Degas would have approved the bright, cotton-candy pink of the endpapers and jacket flaps, but the cream-colored pages, elegant design, and well-reproduced paintings within are quite beautiful. Young ballet lovers will be charmed with both Pavlova's brief, vivid memoir and Degas' paintings. --Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

The magic of royalty and ballet combine against an Edgar Degas backdrop for Anna Pavlova's I Dreamed I Was a Ballerina. Using simple language, the Russian dancer vividly describes the pleasure, awe and inspiration drawn from Sleeping Beauty, her first glimpse of the ballet. ( Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-The story of the famous early-20th-century ballerina, drawn from Pavlova's memoir, Pages of My Life (Michel de Brunoff, 1922; o.p.). Although very poor, her widowed mother was able to take young Anna to a performance of Sleeping Beauty. It had a profound effect upon the child and her dream from that moment on was to become a ballerina and perform in that same theater-the Mariinsky in St. Petersburg. The language of the text is highly stylized, formal, and spare, albeit appropriate both for the story it tells and for the time in which it was originally told. The few sentences per page are dramatically illustrated by the paintings of Degas, and the selections for this text artfully enhance the words with their beauty. There is a pleasing variety of subjects (including musicians and audiences) and perspectives (dancers up close and from afar, in class, and on stage), and text and illustration are in a balanced counterpoint. A lovely pairing occurs when Pavlova's words about her newly discovered passion for ballet appear next to a pencil sketch of a young girl practicing at the bar. This understated moment is followed by a wordless full-spread presentation of The Dance Class, an exuberant painting of ballerinas, color, movement, and anticipation. The contrast is breathtaking. End notes provide more details about Pavlova's life and about Degas's ballet-inspired art.-Dorian Chong, School of Library and Information Science, San Jose State University, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 3-5. This unusual book features the words of Anna Pavlova paired with paintings by Edgar Degas. Pavlova relates how her childhood experience of attending a ballet inspired her love of dance and her ambition to become a ballerina. Though the paintings are not illustrations of the text, they accompany it quite amiably, particularly in the many ballet scenes. It seems doubtful that Degas would have approved the bright, cotton-candy pink of the endpapers and jacket flaps, but the cream-colored pages, elegant design, and well-reproduced paintings within are quite beautiful. Young ballet lovers will be charmed with both Pavlova's brief, vivid memoir and Degas' paintings. --Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

The magic of royalty and ballet combine against an Edgar Degas backdrop for Anna Pavlova's I Dreamed I Was a Ballerina. Using simple language, the Russian dancer vividly describes the pleasure, awe and inspiration drawn from Sleeping Beauty, her first glimpse of the ballet. ( Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-The story of the famous early-20th-century ballerina, drawn from Pavlova's memoir, Pages of My Life (Michel de Brunoff, 1922; o.p.). Although very poor, her widowed mother was able to take young Anna to a performance of Sleeping Beauty. It had a profound effect upon the child and her dream from that moment on was to become a ballerina and perform in that same theater-the Mariinsky in St. Petersburg. The language of the text is highly stylized, formal, and spare, albeit appropriate both for the story it tells and for the time in which it was originally told. The few sentences per page are dramatically illustrated by the paintings of Degas, and the selections for this text artfully enhance the words with their beauty. There is a pleasing variety of subjects (including musicians and audiences) and perspectives (dancers up close and from afar, in class, and on stage), and text and illustration are in a balanced counterpoint. A lovely pairing occurs when Pavlova's words about her newly discovered passion for ballet appear next to a pencil sketch of a young girl practicing at the bar. This understated moment is followed by a wordless full-spread presentation of The Dance Class, an exuberant painting of ballerinas, color, movement, and anticipation. The contrast is breathtaking. End notes provide more details about Pavlova's life and about Degas's ballet-inspired art.-Dorian Chong, School of Library and Information Science, San Jose State University, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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